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16

The crisper provides a somewhat enclosed environment, which prevents moisture from escaping as rapidly. Vegetables keep best at a certain humidity, higher than that typically found in the rest of the fridge, but not so high that condensation starts accumulating on them. Vegetables kept in too-dry air in the rest of the fridge will tend to dry out and shrivel ...


12

You shouldn't cook more than a few minutes, and should cool them as quickly as possible afterwards. Ideally, you'll be blanching them, and here's how: Bring a pot of water with a pinch of salt in it to a roiling boil Dump beans in, and cook for a few minutes Check that beans are fully cooked (time will vary by variety and ripeness of beans) Strain beans, ...


9

Coffee begins to lose its flavour and freshness as soon as the roasting procedure is complete. Whole beans are best used within a month of roasting. The best way at looking at ground coffee is that it is similar to the whole bean, only with a whole lot more (pardon the poor english) surface area. That means that any of the breakdown that occurs to the bean ...


9

The texture of frozen herbs is going to be totally different after thawing. In my opinion frozen herbs are fine for using in cooking, but they don't work well as a garnish or as an addition to a dish at the end of cooking. The taste is definitely better than dried, though.


9

Store them in a well ventilated place. Cool (15 degrees Celsius) and dark will probably do them good too. And buy green bananas. Your bananas are alive. Seriously, they continue to live after they have been picked. Breathing, cell metabolism, hormone production, etc. goes on. You cannot stop this process, you can slow it a bit. In many plants, fridge ...


8

As for fruits (including, for example, tomatoes), ethylene gas is released by fruits and causes them to ripen. You can buy "produce bags" that absorb ethylene gas, and slow the process of ripening. (Some fridges have drawers that absorb ethylene gas, but I doubt you feel like buying a new fridge.) Update: See Vicky's answer and my comment for a couple links ...


7

A very fresh, ripe ear of corn will have a moist, green, unblemished husk; when peeled back, its silk will also moist and clinging to the kernels. In the store, you may find that an ear of corn will have a slightly dried out husk, but if it's still green and the kernels look plump when the husk is pulled back, that ear's fine. Ignore any husks that are very ...


7

Good question! Corn is very versatile. I've found that fresh and frozen whole kernel corn are very interchangeable when used in casseroles. Most casseroles cook long enough that you could use either without making any adjustments. However, canned corn is a different animal. Because it is more processed I would use it in recipes that call for it but I would ...


6

My advice is simple -- don't plan ahead. Being fresh produce, most of us have no idea before you get to the store what the current stuff coming out of the local fields are. This is going to affect both price (in season stuff that hasn't been shipped from the opposite hemisphere is typically cheaper, especially w/ today's fuel prices), and quality (how long ...


6

Posted as answer by request of @BaffledCook: Here's an slightly informal blog post outlining changes in taste between varying degrees of freshness in the grind of a coffee. http://investigationsblog.wordpress.com/2010/03/03/do-i-really-have-to-grind-coffee-right-before-brewing-it/ The short version is that the coffee starts losing freshness as soon as it ...


6

Here are a few things that have worked for me: Brush oil on the dough before applying toppings. (Already suggested) Scoop out the seeds and guts and then dice your tomatoes instead of slicing. This should get rid of some of the moisture. Add cheese and then place tomatoes on top. Stretch your dough evenly and not too thin. I usually don't precook ...


6

I think the issue is that your nori will get soggy if you make the rolls in advance and store them overnight. Nigirizushi may be a better bet for making ahead. Chirashizushi is an older style of sushi which is essentially a bowl of the sushi rice, with the garnishes either mixed in or on top. It should be well amenable to advance preparation.


6

The skins turn black in the fridge, but the fruit itself is fine. Cooks Illustrated tested if refrigerating bananas keeps them good longer (sorry, paywalled), and they found it does—five days longer.


6

Fresh just implies that the bread was never frozen (or canned, irradiated, salted, pickled or otherwise preserved, but those almost never apply to bread). Organic, at least in the US implies following a set of FDA guidelines regarding prohibited methods or techniques or ingredients in producing the product. See: FDA labelling requirements


5

Its going to depend on the type of packaging and also the freezer. Lightly wrapped in plastic wrap (or worse, paper) will freezer burn fairly quickly. Vacuum-sealed will last much longer. A self-defrost freezer with wide temperature swings will burn quicker. A manual defrost chest freezer much slower. Worst case is probably around a month or less (not ...


5

If you're in the UK Lakeland sell Stayfresh Longer bags: http://www.lakeland.co.uk/stayfresh-longer-bags/F/keyword/vegtable+bags/product/1932_1094_1092 which really work extremely well. I'm sure there are similar products available elsewhere. I have no idea how they work, though!


5

I am not aware of any method of freezing herbs that will maintain their freshness, in the general case, especially for delicate herbs such as basil. The best method I know of to freeze herbs, which I personally would not do and have never tried, is to mince or puree the herbs, then freeze them with water. You might do the freezing in an ice cube tray to ...


5

These terms are not mutually exclusive. A given loaf of bread could be both organic and fresh, organic and not fresh, fresh but not organic, or neither fresh nor organic. The term "fresh" also has both technical definitions used by government agencies and commercial producers as well as a variety of non-technical definitions used commonly. Technical ...


5

Acid is your friend here. You have some lemon, and tomatoes are acidic, but apparently that isn't enough. You should get at least a good week out of fresh salsa (mine lasts longer than that). Try adding a good shot of plain, distilled vinegar. Many recipes for salsa (including my own) include vinegar; add as much as you can without negatively affecting the ...


5

Yes it is still good. A lettuce that is kept outside (as in a farmer's market) will get wilted outer leaves, and the merchant will usually cut them off to make the heads nicer. Depending on the resulting size; if they cut out too much compared to other lettuces, I might ask for a lower price if sold by the unit. Personally, I will buy the lettuce with as ...


4

Captured longer ago or not, should not make a difference. When you buy mussels, they are still alive. You can check this by trying to open one. Normally, this isn't an easy task. (Sometimes, their shells can open/close when opening the package in which they came in.) The left hand mussel doesn't look tasty, but there really is nothing wrong with it. It's ...


4

BobMcgee's answer (the accepted one) is great (as far as it goes), as well as all of the comments. Absolutely salt the water, use stock or add flavorings if you like. You can blanch the beans way in advance of the meal, even the day before. Remove the beans from the ice water, shake to remove excess water, roll them in a paper towel and put them in your ...


4

I always pre-cook my crust for 3-8 minutes, depending on whether it's thin crust or not. Works great for what you're describing but I prefer it even when not using fresh tomatoes, I like a slightly crispier crust. Never tried pre-cooking the tomatoes - you could squeeze them, maybe in a ricer, but you're going to lose some texture and a lot of flavor, I ...


4

Freezing 1) Wash and peel the ripened peaches. Peel them the same way you do tomatoes - boil water, drop the peaches in for 1 minute, then drop them into ice water. The skin should just slide right off. Slice in half and remove pits. You can leave them in halves, quarter them, or slice them. I prefer slices. 2) Mix w/ sugar & ascorbic acid. Dissolve ...


4

I have found that the problem with thicker batters not adhering to peppers generally is to do with the outer membrane protecting the flesh of the jalapeno. Essentially, you need to try to remove or weaken its effect. You can minimize the effect of the membrane by: roasting the pepper, then steam in a brown paper bag and remove it scoring the membrane ...


4

As stated by Jefromi back in a similar question; The crisper provides a somewhat enclosed environment, which prevents moisture from escaping as rapidly. Vegetables keep best at a certain humidity, higher than that typically found in the rest of the fridge, but not so high that condensation starts accumulating on them. Vegetables kept in too-dry air in ...


4

The trick I've seen used in Asia is to place a sheet of plastic or cling wrap between the rice and the nori. For example, you could make a long roll with several layers like so: plastic (outermost layer) nori plastic rice other ingredients Roll it up in a long roll, and when you want to eat it, 'jerk' the inner layer of plastic out, thus allowing you to ...


3

Well, just pick what looks fresh. Usually when I go shop for groceries, I don't have much of a list, but rather pick what looks good at the market and then let the produce inspire me and make up something either at the market or at home. Look for bruises and feel the veggies. Vegetables that have been out in the sun for half a day can become soft – ...


3

I have seen two sorts: a polymer felt-type pad and a natural clay version sandwiched between synthetic fabric. Both are meant to regulate humidity. Soak up excess moisture and expire it back as needed. Both claim to be anti-microbial in design. The clay, I suspect, is near in structure to montmorillonite which is micro-crystalline; actually bursts ...


3

Use common advices: closed jars, in a fresh and dark place (a bodega is wonderful for keeping the spices). Direct sun is one of the worst enemies. And when everything else fails, consume it ... f.ex. this very simple recipe, just rice + veg stock + mushrooms + garlic + persil + saffron ...



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