Hot answers tagged

9

No, it is not safe anymore. The scombridae family of fish (mackerels, tunas, bonitos) decay in a way that does not necessarily cause a bad smell, as the bacteria just convert amino acids of the fish into a harmful version. The bacteria that does this is unfortunately facultative anaerobic, which means it prefers oxygen, but will do without, too. So, the ...


7

Dousing your herbs with fertilizer is not going to preserve your herbs, and could make you sick as many fertilizers are toxic. If you want really fresh herbs you can keep them in pots on a windowsill, otherwise your spraying water method is about as good as you are likely to get.


6

The cut end of your zucchini (courgette) looks like it's exuding some water/sap that was previously in the fruit. The colour is due to the rest of the "stuff" in the sap besides water: e.g., perhaps sugars, starches and other stuff. As the water evaporates, it looks like what you show in the picture, which will also explain the beads of goo being stiff or ...


5

Your zucchini (courgette) was loosing sap at the stem end. Apparently, someone by mistake cut the fruit and not only the stem, which will lead to "weeping". The photo below shows an extremely fresh zucchini that was harvested midday in full sun (= lots of water rising within the plant) and then cut into the flesh, mimicking the cut on your specimen: Note the ...


4

The way fish (shelfish included) is dispatched impacts both its flavor and texture. The Japanese have a long history of this knowledge. This type of fish killing is called ike jime. Dave Arnold did some interesting research on this. You'll find it here: http://www.cookingissues.com/index.html%3Fp=5731.html Bottom line: How you kill a lobster does ...


2

That is wax, it's done to help keep the moisture in the root. Turnips are also. You know it's getting along when it gets soft and spongy or when the skin starts to wrinkle, same with turnips, beets, parsnips, carrots....You pretty much can tell whether they are good or not in exactly the same ways. Are the firm and crisp or soft, flabby and spongy?


2

Assuming the jar is in the fridge? Fridge is very drying and the small amount of water sucked up from stems (that leave the water to be cut) isn't enough in your case. Cutting while remaining underwater sometimes makes a difference. I have better luck wrapping herbs loosely in very damp papertowel and storing in tupperware in fridge. After 2 weeks even ...


2

When I buy hot chilies, I look for firm, uniformly bright (or dark, depending on the type) green specimens. Unless I'm in a big hurry, I pick through the pile and choose them individually. I avoid any that are soft, discolored (including the ends), missing caps (the part that attaches to the stem -- they spoil faster after this is removed), wrinkly or ...


2

I take the question to mean how you can best preserve the fresh-made texture with microwaving? I would make, cool and store ravioli in single layers on parchment/waxpaper in a container for transport. Separately, the sauce transported in largest microve-safe container that will fit in office micowave. Heat sauce to boiling then gently add in ravioli and ...


1

Quite the opposite, large ginger rhizomes are more potent both in flavour and aroma, because those compounds take time in the ground to develop and accumulate... There's a Chinese proverb: "It's the older ginger that's got the punch /heat", referring to wisdom of the elders / the experienced... The younger rhizomes have a milder flavour, and a smoother ...


1

General information on brining and smoking a ham can be found in many online sources. Here's a good one with illustrations. I would draw particular attention to the injection step. If you don't inject a large piece of meat like a whole ham, it will not cure evenly (or will take a ridiculously long amount of time to cure). If the ham is particularly large ...


1

Paneer is a fresh cheese, which gives it a short shelf life, typically under two weeks if kept refridgerated. Outside we are talking a few hours. The higher water content of soft cheeses makes them a better medium for the growth of pathogens. Paneer will go bad before one can tell from visual inspection. If you are like 90% of the population, trying a ...


1

Tomatoes are one of the few things I use from cans, mostly because they have more flavor than the ones you usually get at the grocery store, but about 2-3 good-sized, ripe tomatoes substitute just fine for a can. The canning process includes heating the food being canned, so using fresh fruits and veggies might require more cooking to get the same effect or ...


1

A better option is to chop the herb, pack into ice cube trays, cover with oil and freeze (http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/03/how-to-freeze-herbs-for-long-term-storage.html). Alternatively, you can dry your herbs in the microwave for longer storage (http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/03/use-the-microwave-to-dry-your-herbs-for-long-lasting-intense-flavor.html). ...


1

Does cooking a lobster alive alter the flavor/texture? No, not really. Is there any truth to the claims that lobsters don't feel pain? Absolutely not. They feel pain just like you do. Does killing a lobster before cooking alter the flavor/texture? Nope. Are there other ways to kill a lobster so it doesn't suffer the horrible pain of being boiled ...


1

Assuming you can get fresh lobster, you definitely should keep it as fresh as possible prior to cooking. Generally, that will mean keeping the bug alive until it's cooked. I haven't heard of this effect myself, and if it's true, I very much doubt that it's due to the lobster "suffering". If anything, it's probably just that a vigorous boil applies too much ...


1

This is likely to be guar or xanthan gum http://www.uwec.edu/Dining/locations/upload/SushiDO_Ingredients.pdf (Look at one of the items like a Philadelphia roll). Not very appetising but does keep in 'kind of' fresh


1

Assuming you follow the usual procedere of cleaning and boiling ("sterilizing"1) the jars, filling the hot cider in hot jars and closing immediately, you should be fine for a few weeks. Or not, there is always a slight risk of the jars not sealing properly and your cider not being acidic enough. But: Processing the jars as you would for other canning and ...



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