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You absolutely can make jam from frozen fruit. Freezing is like "stopping time" (or at least slowing it down almost to a stop) for the frozen food. Freezing water breaks cell walls, that's why thawed fruit is mushy, but so does boiling when making jam, so no problem at all here. You can also freeze leftover fruit before it spoils and combine various fruits ...


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I don't know about jam specifically, but yes to other things. The standard thing would be to freeze them, and then use them for smoothies, but you can also use them for instant sorbet if you have a food processor: 2 cups of frozen fruit 1/4 tsp of xanthan gum a cup or two of fruit juice maybe some syrup or extra sugar Put the fruit into the food ...


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Personally, I can't drink thick liquids if they are not icy - I gag. Drinkable yogurt, milkshakes that have melted, ice-less smoothies, etc. are all a complete no-go for me. Sure, most people don't have this reaction, but I'm betting I'm not the only one. For whatever reason, the ice particles make it far more agreeable to me. Additionally, it can help to ...


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Date Seed Coffee is in deed a great coffee substitute - if you know how to make it :-) It's nutritious and tasty. However, if you 'roast' the date seed too fast you are likely to get exactly what you got namely charcoal - which is I guess good for Date Seed Barbecue Sauce :-) You need to keep it on low fire for a very very very long time (until it turns ...


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The radioactivity from bananas comes from Potassium and it's not possible to die from eating a particular dose. It may actually be possible to die from being in contact with bananas over a prolonged period of time, but you would need to spend decades around thousands of them. Your body already contains a certain amount of potassium and when you eat ...


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Wikipedia's article on the Sievert, a unit used to measure radiation, tells us a banana's output measures about 0.098 μSv. The lowest fatal dose listed is 4.5 Sv. So we know the radiation from forty-six million bananas would be enough to kill. Annual world production of bananas is around 18 million tonnes, and at 125g per banana, that's enough to kill ...


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I'm afraid this is impossible. It's the freezing, not the thawing, that causes this. Remember, water expands when freezing, so the freezing process breaks the cell walls, so when the pepper thaws, it has lost its crispness. This doesn't matter if you're going to mince it finely or cook it, though! I freeze peppers regularly.


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the smell of the melon, peaches, etc. will tell you if they are ripe. the firmness of fruit will tell if overripe, however that won't work with melons. An overly sweet melon usually mean its too ripe.


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Dust them in flour or powdered sugar. This trick is most commonly used with blueberry muffins.


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From this .pdf on fona.com about flavor profiles: Everyone working to create a new flavor needs to have a common understanding of the desired flavor profile and the flavors they taste during its creation. This can be difficult since everyone’s perception, expectations and experiences are different. That’s why using words called flavor descriptors is so ...


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For an applesauce substitute you could make any other fruit sauce using the same method as you would make homemade applesauce - pear sauce, peach sauce, etc. In my experience applesauce is always a bit of a variable in recipes depending on if its store bought or homemade given the different sugar and water content. Baked goods made with homemade applesauce ...



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