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I see no reason why there would be much difference between doing the pancakes with peaches or apples. If you have a quick Google for Dutch Peach Pancake, you will be bombarded with different recipes. As there are so many out there I won't bother sticking one in here. All I will say is rather than not saute the peaches, as suggested in the other answer. I ...


2

I just skip the sautéing for peaches entirely. The primary benefit of sautéing the apples is to make sure that they are tender by the time baking completes, which isn't necessary for a fruit that's already soft.


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I've found freezing fruit works fantastic. The main reason I started freezing fruit is to save money and to have quality fruit even off season. For example, when cherries are in season, the price is lowest and the quantity and quality is usually highest. So I buy a bunch of cherries, take out the seeds, then bag and freeze them. The same applies to just ...


2

Smoothies are great with frozen fruit. Don't throw fruit in the freezer whole, if it is going to need peeling or coring -- that's much easier to do fresh. For me, the most important thing is not to grind up the fruit before it is frozen. It will immediately start to oxidize and lose flavour and freshness. Fruit frozen whole or in chunks has enough structure ...


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When I buy large amounts of fruit for smoothies, I take an afternoon to break them down: peel, core, and/or stem the fruits (depending on the type), cut into slices or small chunks, measure out single servings of a blend I'll enjoy, and portion it into baggies. The baggies get labelled with the mixture and put straight into the freezer. That way you can just ...


12

In professional smoothie/frozen youghurt/fruit shake shops, you'll usually see the fruit frozen in small pieces for easy portioning. So raspberrys and blueberrys are fine, but you'd wnat to quarter strawberrys and cube mangoes or apples or kiwis or whatever before freezing them. The freezing process itself is important to the strucutral integrity of the ...


10

If your blender is powerful enough, it should have no problem dealing with frozen fruit. I've seen quite a few recipes that call for frozen blueberries, peaches, bananas, etc, in smoothies. Typically, you want to prepare them so that you don't have to deal with trying to cut up frozen things when you want to use them ... so hull strawberries, core and cut ...


5

Phew, too long for a comment. The liquid of (young?) coconuts is sterile and can even be used for transfusions. The abstract of the linked article doesn't say anything about the sterility of older coconuts. I assume that the older coconuts (esperically the peeled ones) are not sterile anymore. This not very trustworthy looking website (this article is ...


3

It's really difficult to say for certain which of your local grocers will carry guava; depending on your location, they may be a seasonal item or simply not locally available. In my experience, guava is fairly common in southeast Asian and Central American cuisines, so you could try an ethnic grocery. But that just changes the question to whether you've ...


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In sum: YES, sugar DOES really help to extract fruit flavors. The answer quoted in the edit does NOT imply that "absorption is slowed down" in general. It merely states that in a sugar solution, sugar will generally not move out of fruit; it doesn't say anything about what else happens. Osmosis is simply a process by which the stuff on both sides of a ...


3

Michael's answer is somewhat correct, but incomplete. Here's a relevant passage from a major food science book: Sugar addition: Sugar may be utilized in cooking. It offers flavor and some preservation. When large amounts of sugar (amounts greater than that found naturally in fruits) are added to the cooking water at the beginning of cooking, the ...



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