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54

You've got a great pan and in a short time I'm sure you'll come to love it. When using a standard pan (one without non-stick coating), heat your pan dry over high heat until you can hold your hand about 6-inches above the cooking surface and feel the heat radiating upward. This allows the tiny cracks and crevices that are imperceptible to the bare hand to ...


23

Seems almost every question about bacteria seems to bring about both the bacteriophobes and the cavalier. In this case, the cavalier are probably closer to being right, but I'll try to present the facts so that you can decide for yourself. The most common microbe groups responsible for household food poisoning are: Salmonella, found in poultry, produces ...


16

Lining with foil works well with cooking methods like baking or broiling, where the food is not stirred or manipulated much, and so the foil can sit undisturbed. With stir frying, you are quite likely to break through the foil while doing the stirring, and have to clean up fully in any case. Also, you probably would not get as good a stir fry due the thin ...


14

Negative, you have not fallen victim to a weak product as far as I know. My all-clad pan works rather well, but I can't be certain it's as heavy as yours. Heft when it comes to a nice stainless pan is important. "Food" seeming to stick, be overcooked, or "not turn out well" is a little vague however. It's extremely difficult to give good advice based on ...


12

I am afraid Chef Flambe's answer is wrong. Not everything has a melting point and a boiling point. Oil is made of big organic molecules, containing long carbon chains*. Unlike anorganic substances with small molecules (like water), heating oil does not lead to a point where the molecules stop attracting each other (that would be the boiling point). ...


10

That price is absolutely ridiculous, and there is no way the frying pans are worth it. To Americans: that's $250 for 2 frying pans! Even All-Clad retails for $100 for a frying pan, and it is among the most expensive cookware. Now, in this case, many people can justify that price for All-Clad, because they heat fast and evenly and will last for several ...


10

Make sure your pan is hot enough before adding the oil and food. You want it to be hot enough to cook the outside as soon as it lands, instead of letting the food cook to the pan by sitting on it and coming up to temperature. http://rouxbe.com/cooking-school/lessons/173-the-water-test-heating-the-pan Heat the empty pan, once heated, add a drop of water. ...


10

You have to make sure to buy a heavy duty, preferrably professional grade pan. Thick base. Most important. I have owned my pans for about five years, and nary a warp. Completely flat. I also have a glass top stove. Note to the wise, do not use a dishwasher to clean good cookware. Always clean pans, pots, knives, etc. by hand. Any good restaurant ...


10

If you cool a pan too quickly it could deform, especially if your using a cheap pan. A cast iron pan could crack. This is most likely to happen if you dip a hot pan in cold water. If you want to get a jump-start on cleaning, de-glaze the pan with a cup of water as you would when making gravy. Pour off this liquid and set the pan aside to cool completely.


9

Most likely, you're not heating your pan enough before placing the scallops in. Without knowing your exact method it's hard to say what's going wrong, but 1-2 tbsp of oil should be enough for a normal amount of scallops. To learn about properly heating your pan, I recommend this link: ...


8

This is specifically the reason for the invention of Bacon Presses


8

This is how I cook bacon, and also produce almost perfectly flat bacon. No special tools required (Well, I'm assuming most people have the following in their kitchen). Tools Sheet Tray Cooling Rack (slightly smaller than the sheet tray) parchment paper (Optional, but makes for easier cleanup). BACON (I like the extra-thick cut). Steps Take the sheet ...


7

Most likely, your pan is not hot enough before you put the scallops in. The pan should be hot enough for a drop of water to bounce around on the pan instead of just evaporating. There have been other similar questions: How do I prevent food from sticking to a standard (non-coated) pan?


7

Not sure if Teflon looks any different when its worn out, but if it does its not much different. Exempting, of course, things like scratched & peeling Teflon. If your pan is no longer giving you the nonstick performance you want, and you've tried basic stuff like giving it a good scrub (using a non-scratching sponge, of course), then it seems like ...


6

Are you sure that the "non-stick" properties of your square pan are still OK. The pan in the picture looks pretty tired. I also note that the pan in the "successful video" has a ridged bottom. This gives more surface area to the bottom of the pan and gets more heat up into the egg mixture to cook it.


5

You also need to use the correct oil. The poster that spoke of using a whole stick of butter was never going to succeed, butter burns at too low a temperature to saute, and for really hot cooking so does olive oil. I've been using grapeseed oil lately with good success for really hot work, it has a really high smoke temperature. Chinese cooking uses ...


5

I have had the same issue when cooking lots of quesadillas, and have found the following combination of techniques to work quite well. The obvious answer has been hit upon already, lower the heat. But I think that's missing an important aspect of the issue. What's happening is most likely that you are turning on the heat and then cooking your first omelet ...


5

The problem you will have is cooking the meat without burning the breadcrumbs and/or the breadcrumbs absorbing lots of oil. You could get around this by baking the schnitzel rather than frying them. However, you don't necessarily need a hammer to thin the meat - a heavy saucepan or rolling pin will do just as good a job.


5

No. Neither plain stainless steel nor non-stick pans (which yours is as it's coated with Teflon) need to be seasoned. Not only is seasoning unnecessary, but it will only cause your pan to look dirty. It would do no good at all. Seasoning is all about preventing rust and sealing "pores", making the surface more resistant to sticking. Neither of those things ...


4

You might also use a well-seasoned cast iron skillet. This will have the double benefit of a high thermal mass so the temperature won't be down, and a surface that discourages sticking.


4

It might be that the oil is hotter when you put the first side in and cooled a little by the cooking meat when you flip it. You could try turning the heat up shortly before you flip, or taking the meat out, letting the oil get up to temperature again and adding the meat on the other side.


4

As others have said, the issue is the hot oil and water interacting. You need to reduce or eliminate one in order to prevent the splatter or find a way to mitigate the damage. Remember the basics - allow the meat to warm up to room temperature before cooking and pat it dry before you begin. That should allow you to use less oil without it turning into a ...


4

Just search on www.ebay.com for "Pyrex Flameware" and you will find things like : Vintage Pyrex Flameware Saucepan Skillet + Handle SET Vintage Pyrex Glass Flameware Skillet w/ Handles 1930's Pyrex Flameware saute pan w/ detachable handle It is highly unlikely that you will find a new one. The reason is that the formula r for Pyrex before 1940 was way ...


4

Health Risks Associated with Asbestos The reputation of asbestos is indeed well-deserved. Inhalation of asbestos fibers can cause a wide range of potentially fatal conditions. It is unlikely that normal home use of a product that contains asbestos will expose one to asbestos fibers. However, people who work with asbestos, whether mining the raw materials ...


4

Rolling when the consistency is correct is important. Looking at your example I would say that attempt needed more heat. The egg should be cooked on the bottom, while being 'jelly-like' on the top. This makes the roll stick to itself without sticking to the pan. You also need to just wipe down the pan with more oil after each roll. When in doubt turn up the ...


4

To be honest, decent non-stick pans are a dime a dozen. I'd never put a non-stick pan in the dishwasher no matter what the label says, so I wouldn't even consider that a factor. Oven-safe is a major consideration. The higher the temperature you want to bake at the less non-stick you coating will be. I have a high-temperature "non-stick" pan that I can't ...


3

Disclaimer: I've never touched, let alone used, a Fissler pan. One of the primary things to look for in a good frying pan is for it to be "tri-ply" or "fully clad" (i.e., for it to be stainless steel with an aluminum core). Manufacturing such pans is generally more expensive, but good ones perform wonderfully and last forever. For the price of the ...


3

Perhaps add a little more oil before you flop the meat? So that would mean that the second side is also protected from sticking.


3

My first advice is to use a bit more oil, maybe. I recently did scallops with a recipe from Thomas Keller, and his recipe calls for quite a bit of oil--probably 3 tbs or more (don't remember precisely, but it was way more than I would have put on my own). This was also my most successful pan-seared scallop batch to date, so I think he's onto something. And ...


3

Corning made a Visions pan - I had a set and used it for years. You might find them on eBay or at a garage sale. I didn't really like it as a pan - took a long time to heat up and then stayed hot, thus making a gas stove into an electric and making an electric even less responsive. It's not completely clear, it's kind of brownish.



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