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41

The typical rule of thumb is that if it's a non-stick pan you do add a little oil to the pan first before heating. Most manufacturers usually recommend this to extend the life of the non-stick coating. For regular pans (those without non-stick coating) you should heat them dry until you can feel the radiating from the surface when your hand is held about ...


41

There are really only a few secrets to good fried rice: Day Old White Rice (Make it the day before, let it cool, place it in the fridge) This I'd say is absolutely, the main thing. The texture will NOT be right if you use freshly cooked rice. There will be too much moisture. HEAT! Your Wok needs to be hot. You want everything to cook quickly. Cook ...


36

The most important thing you can do is buy quality beef. You can throw a USDA Select steak on a 700 degree charcoal grill, cook it perfectly, and it'll still be tough and not at all what you'd get at a fine steakhouse. In the USA there are three grades of beef available to a consumer: Select, Choice, and Prime. There are lesser grades but they go to fast ...


28

"Commonly used" depends mostly on the culture, I'd assume. There's a lot of different oils, so I've organized by use rather than try for a complete list. Some of the ones that you might find in a "typical American" foodie's kitchen include: For frying: something with a high smoke point : peanut, sunflower, soy, extra light olive oil For baking (muffins ...


26

Onions always benefit from a few minutes on their own to soften and start sweetening. Garlic burns easily, especially when finely chopped or crushed, so in general should not be fried as long as onion. Having said that, when doing a quick stir fry or similar dish, you can throw in the garlic first for 10-20 seconds so that it flavours the oil.


24

First, use self-rising flour or use 1 teaspoon of baking powder added to each cup of all-purpose flour that you're using for the dredging and coating mixture. The carbon dioxide produced during frying will cause the coating to expand and become more flaky. If you want more tender and flavorful chicken, first brine the pieces in buttermilk that has been ...


24

It sounds to me like the issue may be that you're crowding the pan. Basically, to get everything nice and brown and crispy, you need enough space for all of the steam to escape. That picture you showed has potatoes stacked on top of each other -- that means as the bottom items cook, they're going to end up steaming the items above them. At a diner, they ...


24

One factor you may not be considering is the quality of the egg itself. The highest-grade eggs have firm whites and more regular shapes when cracked onto a flat surface. The fresher the egg, generally, the higher the grade. If you've ever cracked a grocery store egg next to a fresh-laid egg, the difference is clear. The hen's diet makes a big difference, ...


22

I think this is a problem with all oils. When something burns, it produces smoke. Smoke is generally indicative of something that isn't particularly good for us if inhaled. Same holds for oils. It seems that all oils will begin to produce toxins once they hit their smoke point. However, before that, they are completely fine. So pick an oil that will handle ...


21

You might consider a different approach - don't fry them. Drop them (carefully) into a pot of boiling sauce instead. They come out perfectly even, very tender, and more flavourful than frying. Usually the sauce we're talking about is a sweet tomato-based sauce, but it could be anything that's reasonably thick (so that the meatballs don't just fall ...


20

Use a deeper dish. Fries shouldn't be fried in a skillet. Use a 4+ quart pan. Then cover with a metal screen to reduce the splatter.


20

You're heating the oil past its smoke point. There is no trick or technique that will prevent oil from smoking and oxidizing ("burning") at temperatures above the smoke point. It is literally being slowly destroyed at that temperature. I honestly don't know why TV chefs are so attached to the idea of cooking with olive oil when most serious attempts to ...


19

How small was your onion dice? if its too big it can stop the meat sticking together, so try and make it as small as possible. did they hold together when you formed them? You might try to press the balls together as firmly as possible, as if they are not formed tightly enough this can cause them to fall apart. Be wary of adding too much egg as well as ...


19

I've never been one to keep track of cooking times with meats, since it will vary wildly with meat thickness, burner strength and type, phase of the moon, etc. Edit: I forgot to answer "how to go about searing". I sear chicken like I sear beef: hard and fast. The point is to get that Maillard reaction going to add some deliciousness and texture (not to ...


18

Onions The more you cook an onion, the sweeter it is going to get; heat breaks down the volatiles and complex starches and converts them to sugars. When an onion is completely brown then it is basically caramelized. The point of sweating onions is to draw out some of the pungency, but not all. If you cook them 'til they're brown (caramelized) then they ...


17

The trick is to chill the Mars bar in a fridge for a few hours before cooking. Prepare a batter mix (the kind you deep fry fish in) and get your oil heated to temperature. Here's a batter recipe I've used before: Basic Fish Batter (Delia Smith Online) (You can't fault Delia!) You can use sparkling water to introduce more bubbles into the batter ...


17

The best thing I've figured out about turning eggs is: do not do it too early. You need to wait for the cooked part of the egg to develop a strong texture before it will support its own weight. It's very difficult to turn a floppy, soft egg, where it's comparatively easy to flip an egg that has been cooked more completely on one side. I also use a relatively ...


17

If the exterior of the gnocchi you had at the restaurant was crispy in the sense that it had a crunch to it, then they probably dropped it in a deep fryer for a minute or so to crisp it up. I usually saute mine in clarified butter to brown the exterior and form a crust but it's not necessarily "crispy". Regardless of what you're frying and whether you're ...


17

So I have a method that I just worked out but it is insanely labor intensive and only suited to small batches. With that said, here you go. Also, steps will be slightly out of order so make sure you read completely through. To create filled french fries: First, you need to cut your potatoes into slightly larger fries than normal. You are looking for about ...


17

Tips for perfect fried egg: Temperature of your pan is the key. (low - medium) Do not flip the egg (this will cook the top too fast and bye bye to runny golden yolk) Halfway through the cooking take a lid for the pan put a small bit of water in it and close the lid on it for a few minutes. (Too much water and your eggs are wet when you pull them, too ...


17

Donuts are a deep fried food. The texture of deep fried food is unique and cannot be duplicated by other methods. If you bake doughnut dough, you will get small rolls, which will have a similar aroma, but not the same combination of moist, soft inside and fat-crispy outside. You could bake it, as with any other yeast dough, only nobody will recognize it as a ...


16

if you spoon a little of the frying oil over the top of the egg whilst it is cooking this will help to 'set' the top of the egg, making less likely to tear apart or break the yolk when you do flip it. Also try and flip with the yolk near the bottom of the spatula so it has less distance to travel and will be less likely to break.


16

Pan frying means letting the food sit in the pan and occasionally stirring or flipping. It tends to be done with larger pieces of food, and at a medium to medium-high heat. Sautéing means shaking the pan back and forth - making the food "jump", if you're translating directly. It's done at a high heat, for a short time, usually with thinly-sliced or ...


16

There are two parts to this question, the stated part, and the unstated "are you really frying an egg if there is no oil?" For the first part, most manufacturers of non-stick pans claim that their product makes oil unnecessary, and generally I've found that to be true. A little oil helps, but "necessary" might be a stretch. To maximize your non-stickyness ...


16

It doesn't go into the meat, it soaks up water and becomes a slurry. The slurry is transparent, so you don't see it. If you fry it as it is, you won't prevent spraying and sticking the same way it would have been possible with a dry flour layer. If you roll it again, you will have these effects again, plus slightly more heat buffering because of the double ...


15

Always heat the oil with the pan. Heating pans dry damages the pans (especially non-stick ones). Also, there are no warning signs that the pan is hot when you set something else on it or bump into it. Adding cold ingredients to hot pans also damages the pan, and can scald the ingredients. Even oil. If you guessed too hot, you can damage several things ...


15

Hot, hot, hot. Steak restaurants use a very hot grill. That's the key. You want to get a good sear on the outside without over cooking the interior. The three ways I've seen used with success at home are: Broil on high. You need a good broiler for this Use a cast iron pan (preferably with ridges) and get it very hot before you begin Use a grill. Get it up ...


15

Panko won't stick to chicken (too dry), but will stick to egg. Egg won't stick to chicken (too smooth and non-absorbant), but will stick to flour. Flour will stick to chicken. Dredge first through flour, then through (well beaten) egg, then through panko. It's a tricky combination, but if you do it right the results are excellent. Any dry spices you want ...


15

By frying your potatoes then putting the lid on, you fried your potatoes then steamed them, so it's no wonder they weren't crispy. Although it takes longer, par-boiling the potatoes first is by far the best way to get crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside potatoes. Par-boiling cooks the inside of the potato, so that all you need to do in the pan is ...


14

For pan frying you probably want to start with a firm tofu. It's a good idea to press the tofu to remove excess water: wrap the tofu in a cloth and place it between two cutting boards, weighting the top cutting board with a heavy book or other similar object. Wait at least twenty minutes (you can prepare the rest of the vegetables/onions for the stir fry at ...



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