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Ground chicken can be very soft and sticky, and difficult to form into balls without everything sticking together or going "squish". If you tried to make balls from completely cooked chicken, though, the balls wouldn't stay together. So, cooking part of the chicken gives the mixture some structure so they can be formed, and will stay together when you put ...


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If the veggies are barely submerged, you're effectively steaming. It is not as pure a method as actually raising them slightly above the (I presume very rapidly boiling) water, but if you keep them moving enough, the result is going to be more similar than it would be to be boiling/poaching/simmering. In case you are unaware, you can get very inexpensive ...


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The answer is a bit complicated, because there is a confusing language issue here. In standard cooking terminology, there is nothing in common between the two (except that both are stovetop). Sautéeing requires a wicked hot pan, a layer of oil (you can't use nonstick at these temperatures), and constant movement of the food. Basically, you are ...


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I disagree with Neil's answer here. All the three terms of "poaching", "boiling" or "simmering" require that your food is fully submerged, especially for poaching it has to be free-floating in a large amount of water. I doubt that you are submerging anything in 4 mm, and this little amount of water would boil off quickly if you had so little food that it is ...


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Poaching, Boiling and Simmering. Boiling is the method of cooking food in boiling water, or other water-based liquids such as stock or milk. Simmering is gentle boiling, while in poaching the cooking liquid moves but scarcely bubbles. SOURCE


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An Italian friend of mine always adds some water to the olive oil when sweating onions. The idea is that she doesn't want the onions to brown, nor the oil to disintegrate, and by adding some water the temperature is kept down. (She also turns the heat down almost all the way.) I sometimes do it myself, if I've got enough time. It takes much longer for the ...


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It may be possible that the OP just wants less fluffy pancakes. Follow these three steps to flatten almost any pancake recipe: Replace flour with "cake flour" or "pastry flour." These have less gluten and will therefore take a longer beating without getting tough. Add 10% more milk. This is usually no more than 1-2 tbsp for most recipes. Beat the ...


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Just add liquid. You could even make funnel cakes! (That "happened" one morning when I accidentally glugged too much oil into my skillet. The little girl I was cooking for was beyond delighted!) Same batter + a little more milk or water (prob don't use buttermilk as it activates the baking powder), just more oil in the pan, a nd drizzled through a funnel ...


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Place a bowl under a colander. Dump the browned beef with fat into the colander, then using a kitchen utility bowl, cereal bowl or whatever that is slightly smaller than the colander and press down all around. The fat is now PRESSED out of the beef and into the bowl. Now pour the bowl of fat into an old can and place in freezer to await garbage day. ...


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According to this article, button mushrooms may turn a pink color if bruised while being stored or handled. This sounds very much like what has happened to you, as you've stated that the mushrooms were old and not stored properly. This is not poisonous or bad to eat by any means, but I understand that one would not want to take the risk, especially when it ...


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Just as with kneading, stirring develops the gluten in the flour. over-mixing batter is a culinary no-no (fr. non-non). Batters are frequently rested in the refrigerator so the gluten can relax. Foods fried in batter that has been overworked and deprived of adequate rest is like a chef exposed to the same conditions–tough and tired. Whole wheat flour has ...


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I was looking at this same question awhile back when I got an IR thermometer, what I found was 2 things. The first thing is that there are too many variables to have a single answer that would work. The pan temperature you want at the start depends on a number of factors including: Material of the pan: how much heat it conducts Mass of the pan: how much ...


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Reading these responses has only left me more confused about this matter. Empirically I have found that adding cold oil immediately before placing a protein in the pan has a powerful anti-stick effect regardless of the pan type. Both sides of the argument here have made good points, but no one has mentioned the idea of doing both. I've been experimenting ...



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