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Heated metal will move towards the source of the heat causing the valley in the middle of cheap cook ware. The heated bottom side is hotter than the inner surface of the pan and expands more. If heated and cooled slow this is much less likely to occur. Cooking at too high a temperature and pouring water in the pan while very hot will cause this type warp. ...


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If you add butter to ground beef, say, burgers in a pan, it makes them taste better, and gives them a slight crunch on the outside, and yes, attributes to a better color. Same with steaks. It's not done out of necessity, it's done out of deliciousness.


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As some of the commenters have noted, this just might not be possible. Water is the enemy of crispy, and unfortunately for your chicken skin braising is all about moist heat. I would try searing the skin before braising, if you don't already, in order to get some of the fat rendered out and the Maillard reaction on it's way. Braise as you would, but remove ...


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Cast iron or carbon steel. Both require seasoning with oil and neither are non-stick immediately, but rather after seasoning and some use, the pans become more non-stick over time. But once they're properly seasoned, they're as non-stick or nearly as non-stick as teflon and the like. They do, however, require the use of fats in cooking. And they can last 30 ...


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You generally don't want to be cooking eggs or pancakes at 250°C, so Teflon is fine for this purpose Both eggs and pancake mix consist mostly of water, so you would have a hard time raising the temperature past 100°C until the water has been mostly evaporated. Unless you uses a large fat or oil film, which you don't need in a Teflon pan Bacon and steaks ...


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The one alternative is ceramic pans. They are pretty awesome as long as they don't stick, much better than Teflon. However, they fail earlier, after maybe 6 months of regular, but not heavy, use. After that, they can still be used for cooking, but aren't really non-stick. They can stand much higher temperatures than Teflon (the manufacturers give them a 400 ...


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The options for non-stick cookware that contain neither PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) nor PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene), the substances better known as Teflon, are limited. Most are ceramic, the general consensus on those (Consumer Reports, America's Test Kitchen, Amazon reviews, and rumtsho all seem to agree) is that the non-stick surface is great for a ...


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My grandma made them like regular pancakes, but without the baking powder/baking soda. It works perfectly for me, too. I hate fluffy pancakes -- they don't have the same flavour. Also, a recommendation, a bit of vanilla extract added onto the batter makes a lovely scent for the pancakes.


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By frying your potatoes then putting the lid on, you fried your potatoes then steamed them, so it's no wonder they weren't crispy. Although it takes longer, par-boiling the potatoes first is by far the best way to get crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside potatoes. Par-boiling cooks the inside of the potato, so that all you need to do in the pan is ...


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That definitely sounds like your pan is too hot. That's a bit unusual as most often people have difficulty with the opposite problem. Here's a great video on testing pan temperature with water. If your pan is non-stick, look here: How can you judge when a non-stick pan is the correct temperature for pan frying?. At any rate, try lowering your temperature.


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Tossing relatively frequently (maybe every minute or so) should in fact help and would seem the simplest, most traditional technique (here another video, with potatoes). If you leave the cubes for a long time on one side and only toss after the first side is completely done, any cube you fail to turn will burn. But cubes remaining unturned are not a problem ...


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When I cook small cubed food, I fry them in oil that is half way up the side of the cube, then when the bottom side is done, I turn them over one by one with chop sticks. This cooks all of the sides evenly, but does takes some extra time. For large cubes I brown each side individually, again turning with chopsticks. I'm a bit OCD though, so you may just want ...


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You have a fourth option, to saute the onions and peppers first, remove them from the pan, fry the potatoes and then reintroduce the vegetables and toss just before serving. The vegetables will continue to release water while they are waiting, so it might be an idea to sit them in a strainer placed over a bowl.


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You probably should keep #3, but use a much higher temperature for the vegetables. Non-starchy vegetables contain lots of water. If you shallow fry them at a leisurly pace, their juices flow out and stay in the pan, making everything a bit soft. You also get a bit less grilled-like taste. If you saute them instead, you'll end up with dry vegetables. ...


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I'm going to assume you're not considering deep frying, which would generally be the easiest way to fry evenly on all sides (at once). If you want something similar to pan frying, probably the simplest solution to get evenly browned cubes, assuming you have sufficient time, is to roast the food in the oven instead with a little oil or fat (which some people ...



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