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Ok so you said salmon fillet. So my first question is how big is the filet. Fish don't develop protein chains to hold together the same way red meat has. So the flakes don't really hold together if pulled too hard, so I wonder if your fillets are too big. When I cook fish, especially salmon I try cut the fillet into serving sizes portions, maybe 2 inches ...


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The best technique I've found for frying fish is not to flip it at all. I start the fish on the stove, skin down, then I finish cooking it in the oven. You need an oven safe frying pan of course, cast iron or a high-temperature non-stick works well. You get a nice crispy skin this way. If you are set on flipping then you need to be gentle, think of it as ...


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are you keeping the skin on? If you take the skin off it's likely to fall apart. If you've kept the skin and it's falling apart I suggest it's overcooked.


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I experimented with salting and brining. Brining the cut-up pieces of aubergine for a few hours gives by far the best results. This methods gets rid of the bitter taste, and even takes care of the slightly allergic reaction I always get eating aubergines. The brine becomes quite brown. They will hardly take up any oil like this, cook quickly and evenly. I ...


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Boil the gnocchi till it floats to the top of the pan, drain it, leave it for a few minutes. Fry till brownish. I use olive oil to do mine, it always come out fine.


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I would also cut down on the "Full Basket" to lessen the Oil Temp Recovery. Try just a few handfuls at a time to keep the temp above 325'F. Frying time per batch should only be between 1 - 2 minutes.


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You could try par-boiling the fries first. Drop your cut yams into boiling water until they begin to soften (about 5-7 minutes.) Remove them and let the cool completely before frying. 12-14 minutes seems like an awfully long time to keep something immersed in boiling oil. The par-cook method, while increasing overall preparation time will increase the ...


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If I am pan frying, I cover the bacon with cold water, and cook on medium til the water evaporates. Then cook until finished. The bacon cooks evenly and stays flat. Since I like my bacon extra crisp I will put foil on the bottom of a small pot and press down on the bacon and let it sit for 1 minute or so depending on the cut of bacon.


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Two ways: Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with sides with parchment paper. Add the bacon, add a second pan to weigh it down. No need to turn Second method: Place bacon in a cold skillet. Add another heavy frying pan over the top. Fry on low heat, turn after 5 to 8 minutes, turn with tongs, replace the other skillet, and fry until desired ...


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Its your temp. The high temp of your deep fryer is exactly why your starches are staying put. Why did you choose a cooler temp for your shallow frying?


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Let's see how to GUARANTEE this undesired effect happening (if you do/have all or most of the things on the list): -Unevenly cut onions -Onions from different varieties mixed -Pan very hot -Not frequently stirring (or saute throwing) -Thin bottomed pan on a hob plate with low thermal mass and weak heat coupling (glass ceramic or electric coil would be ...


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It really depends on how much salt you like in your food. Most recipes are written for unsalted butter because it makes it easier to control the amount of salt. If your butter is salted, you can use it and it will probably still taste good. Although, you may need to reduce salt a bit elsewhere in the recipe if it uses a lot of butter. When in doubt, go ...


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It depends on what you want to achieve - are you after the crisp, juicy texture of fried chicken, or are you simply interested in cooking the bird in as little time as possible? If you want the rich, full taste of rooster, and you want it tender, you will need to cook it low and slow. There is no substitute, save for perhaps braising in a pressure-cooker. ...


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When meat and poultry are tough it is because because of connective tissue which transfers the muscle's work to bone. The harder a muscle in an animal works the more connective tissue it will have and the tougher (but generally more flavorful) the result will be. Connective tissue (collagen mostly in muscles) breaks down slowly in the presence of moisture ...


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take frozen squid tube, put in just enough water to cover.On low heat bring to .boil and simmer for 10 to 14 mins. Dry squid and cut near through at 45 degs on one side, turn over and repeat ,Crush garlic in to pan with oil, salt and pepper squid and fry in hot oil for 1 to 1.5 mins. Yum.. very tender



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