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Hamburgers can be cooked by the same method as steaks; if you have an oven safe pan, basically bake and sear or sear and bake; the former is a bit easier since flipping a mostly-uncooked hamburger can be very difficult. Basic instructions: Place hamburgers on cast-iron or other oven-safe pan. Bake for 5-10 minutes (length depends on thickness) at ...


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You could use a low temperature water bath (sous vide). Cook your burgers 56 - 60 c (depending on desired doneness), 1.5 to as much as 6 hours. Remove from bag. Put whatever sear you want on it, because the burger will be cooked.


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Make sure you flip it reasonably frequently; that'll actually make it come up to temperature faster inside, so the outside won't have as long to burn. Also make sure you haven't made your patties excessively thick. 10-15 minutes on medium sounds like a fairly long time for normal sized burgers, so possibly yours are on the thick side. If you do really want ...


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I like using a cast iron skillet under the broiler...like this: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/15457/6279 It will caramelize the outer layer of the meat without burning it...


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I tried everything to keep my meatballs together while frying. Every time your turn one they start to fall apart. With the advice of a professional chef, I placed the rolled and reefrigerated balls on a cookie sheet (9 x13) or sprayed tray and cooked in the oven at 375 until browned. then spoon them into my gravey. None will ever fall apart again. No ...


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I don't use flour when panko breading instead I put a layer of panko on a tray and then dip each piece ofchicken or pork in a seasoned egg mixture and lay them on top of the layer of panko then put another layer of panko on top and let rest for 15 minutes to allow the pankao to absorb the moisture and bind to the meat...then fry as usual


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The secret I learnt somewhere and can attest from experience to work, is to dry out the skin. Dry the skin with a paper towel. Sprinkle a decent amount of salt on the skin and let it sit for a little while. Dry off the water that was drawn out and wipe off the excess salt. Now proceed to place the fish skin down in preheated oil and let it cook until it's ...


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How I would do it: Fillet Fish Salt to Taste (Be liberal) Coat with Cornmeal Heat oiled pan, on a low to medium heat Add fish skin side down, turn once skin looks crisp then allow to cook through.


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As to the science behind why this works, I can only guess. However, as to other things you can try for this trick, I managed to find some references from old cookbooks about using slices of potato for clarifying their deep-fryer oil. Other suggestions were a slice of bread or lemon peel. Weird — but interesting. The Young Woman's Journal, Volume 12 (1901) ...


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The flour as the first dredging step does help the rest of the breading stick. Think traction. It gives the egg something to hold on to, which then holds on to the breadcrumbs. You're right, the vast majority of recipes that call for this kind of breading call for a three step process. That's because it works better. I've done it with and without the initial ...



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