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Regardless of whether pan-searing seals in the flavor (it doesn't), Malachi is correct. The poster who was rewarded with the winning answer will have ruined his steak. I will add some details for the roasting. Preheat your oven to 500F Pan-sear first, high heat. If you didn't produce smoke in your kitchen, you did it wrong. Have prepared a drip system ...


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If you're going to use the bag method, you may want to use a clear plastic bag, and only drop in between 1 and 3 items at a time (exact number depends on the size of the items relative to the size of the bag). If you do end up getting two items stuck together, just grab one of the items through the bag, and shake until the other item falls away. If you're ...


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Kneading dough is important. Make sure you don't knead very tight and roll it very tight. While frying heat oil to high and reduce to medium. Wait for few seconds and fry the jamun in medium or low heat. Add baking powder which helps to soft. Dont leave the fried jamun out for long after frying. Drop it in sugar syrup. Make sure it dips completely in the ...


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I very regularly make tortillas myself using a very similar method, and had exactly the same problem. As I'm trying to cut down on the amount of fat used, I have been putting less and less in recently, but I'm still getting them lovely and soft. Here is my recipe: Ingredients: 60g of flour per tortilla (plain white works well, but I've had good results ...


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If you are using a "tiny bit of olive oil," I'm sure you are using too little. I have only made tortillas using shortening and lard and when doing so, my fat weighed-in at nearly a quarter the weight of my flour. I don't know how you measure-out your ingredients, but that would be roughly 1/3 cup lard or shortening for 2 cups of flour (with a little over ...


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My answer would be "after the onions". I had a chef tell me that garlic (and black pepper) burn around 140° C (284° F). You can guess this is quite low if you've burned garlic as often as I have before. I'd suggest either controlling the heat, or as Stephen Eure mentionned: cooking along something moisty to avoid direct high heat.


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Examining your questions in order: The general rule is onions first. Sauté the garlic towards the end for 30-ish seconds before removing from the heat. As ElendilTheTall correctly pointed out, garlic can scorch quickly, especially if you tend to sauté on the hot side (as I do). Starting your sauté with onions first has two advantages: it allows you to ...



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