Hot answers tagged

23

It's not an old wives tale; it's actually true to a point. I can't say it better than Exploratorium, Science of Cooking Can weather affect candy making? Oddly enough, it can. Cooking candy syrup to the desired temperature means achieving a certain ratio of sugar to moisture in the candy. On a humid day, once the candy has cooled to the point where ...


9

This is actually (partially) true. It is more correct for fudge, not so much for candy overall. The texture of fudge and fondant depends a lot on the water contents where a 1% difference will matter and it will absorb moisture from the air during the cooling and beating period. So a high humidity will result in a runny fudge. Source: "On Food and Cooking", ...


9

The most likely culprit is how well you beat the mixture just before pouring it into the pan. I really like Alton Brown's explanation of the fudge-making process. What you're trying to do is form very small sugar crystals which provide fudge with its fine texture. Those crunchy bits you describe are larger crystal formations which can happen if you have a ...


8

In Scotland we make a kind of fudge that is deliberatly hard and crystallised known as Tablet. This was a popular treat when I was growing up. Essencially the recipe for tablet, soft fudge, toffee and caramel are quite similar. The difference is made by how you cook and treat the mix as it cools. Essentially you need to know about sugar boiling points. ...


7

Like so many things, if you know what you are trying to do, fudge is not difficult to get right. Fudge is a high fat candy. In the US chocolate is implied but the addition of chocolate doesn't change the process. You want a solid, creamy candy with a smooth texture. As Elendil wrote, it is important to ensure that you cook the candy to the correct ...


5

Candymaking is extremely sensitive to temperature. If the mixture heats higher than the point that produces the desired texture, you're basically out of luck. That makes it very critical that you reach and not exceed your target temperature. This is particularly difficult when making candy because much of it starts as a sugar-and-water syrup. Water has ...


5

Fudge is basically a chocolate flavored candy. You combine chocolate and a sugar syrup and boil the syrup until you get the desired concentration. Everything else about the recipe is to either minimize sugar crystal size or add flavor. Sweetened condensed milk will do two things- 1- give you a nice, caramelly flavor 2- Save a little time. Since it has less ...


5

Fudge is essentially caramel (sugar heated to 116ºC, usually with water) combined with some kind of fat - sometimes butter, sometimes condensed milk. It's not hard to make, but it does require precision and care at the caramelisation stage, and that means having a decent sugar thermometer. If you just try and eyeball it you will fail more often than not. ...


5

I like Kristina's suggestion that you research some of the basics of candy making. I'll answer those questions only briefly. Generic Candy Questions You don't need to heat particularly slowly This is not like an egg custard where the speed of heating will affect the curdling temperature. You're just trying to get water out. Just don't heat it so fast ...


4

Butter is typically added when the fudge is first taken off the heat- but it isn't mixed in. The butter is allowed to melt across the surface to keep it from forming a skin on top. Vanilla, nuts, and all other additions are mixed in at the end of the cooling period when the fudge is stirred. Alton Brown, with some help from Shirley Corriher, explained the ...


3

I'm not a professional fudger, but here is my theory: one should add it to the boiling mixture. The reason is that butter has milk solids that are said to “burn” at low temperatures (somewhere in the range 120C-150C or 250F-300F) which just above the soft ball stage (113C or 235F) needed for making fudge. I interpret the burning to mean that those milk ...


3

Fudge doesn't need to be refrigerated. It is candy and nothing can grow in such a high concentration of sugar. The ambient humidity can mess with your fudge a bit if it isn't sealed. Too dry and the fudge will dry out and get crumbly on the outside. Too humid and the fudge will absorb enough water out of the air to melt. It is simple enough to tightly wrap ...


3

It sounds like your fudge simply wasn't heated enough. Fudge is basically a superconcentrated syrup, and it sets when sugar dissolved in the water (from the butter and milk) comes out of solution as the mixture cools and forms crystals. Temperature is your proxy measurement for the concentration of sugar - if you don't hit the right temperature, the ...


2

No-Fail Fudge - this is achievable! Fudge is magic and delicious ... And a chemistry project with full respect to all the prior responders. Here is a link to the no-fail recipe that I personally have seen mass-produced by a room full of novices for a fund-raising project. Follow the directions EXACTLY and you will have mastered no-fail fudge: ...


2

Fructose is one of the sugars in corn syrup. The problem is that 112 C is above the caramelization temperature of fructose, which is 110 C (230 F); this is uniquely low among the various common sugar molecules, most of which begin to caramelize around 160 C (320 F). The toffee flavor that you are getting is due to the caramelization components. However, ...


2

Chocolate flavor depends a lot on fat, preferably cocoa fat. I would try using high-quality dark chocolate (70% to 99%) instead of the cocoa powder, or at the very least weakly de-fatted non-dutched cocoa powder (most cocoa powder in the stores is highly de-fatted). I would also throw out the butter and use chocolate instead. I would only try playing around ...


2

Looking at your recipe, the most obvious thing to me is that there is no salt. Adding a small quantity of salt (say, 1/2 tsp) will enhance the flavors of the ingredients already present. The second thing you might try is switching to dutch processed cocoa; many people find this has a more intense chocolaty taste. You could try enhancing the overall flavor ...


2

It's possible that you need to add more chocolate, or use a different type of chocolate. Dutch process cocoa has a much darker color than natural cocoa, for example. It's also possible that the color is being lightened by microscopic air bubbles. This can happen if you use a fluffy ingredient (such as marshmallow cream) or if you mix a lot of air into the ...


2

Probably it's the cocoa/chocolate used - there are some brands/breeds that are a lot darker than others and this shows in the final product. I have made the exact chocolate or marble cake with cocoa powder (same processing type) from different manufacturers and the results were optically quite different. This won't necessarily influence the taste, though, ...


2

logophobe's answer is correct on how to fix this. As for what you can do with it if you don't want to start over: My favorite uses are as hot fudge topping or dissolve it in water or milk for luxurious hot chocolate.


2

The first question is how fussy you want to be about uniformity. Many people are satisfied just using a long, thin knife to score the fudge in roughly straight lines. If you want professional-level uniformity in the size of pieces, you'll need to lay out a grid with a straightedge, measuring equal distances on all four sides, and then use the straightedge ...


2

There are recipes that specifically use condensed and or evaporated milk as a shortcut to making fudge. It's not just a drop in replacement, it's a whole change in method. Just do a search for "easy fudge recipe" on Google to get examples of these fudge recipes that use condensed milk. To add my opinion however, the old fashioned cooking and churning method ...


1

Fudge really only has a shelf life of a week or two. First it will start to crystallize on the outside (which is actually very yummy in my opinion), but then it will start to grow mold. Good hygiene will lengthen the time before mold starts to grow, but ultimately fudge is not a preserved food and isn't meant to keep. The individual ingredients will keep ...


1

If it was true at one time, modern HVAC makes it moot. Also, it is specific to where the saying came from: "cool" and "humid" mean different things in different places, to the point where dry in Kauaʻi is more humid than wet in Indio. If it's raining outside but the heater is on because it's also cold outside, it's probably very dry inside. So the advice ...


1

The easiest remedy is just to cut it into smaller pieces, so you don't feel overwhelmed when eating a single piece. Cocoa powder is slightly bitter, so cutting it back might actually make the fudge taste sweeter. Instead, you could take small portions of the the fudge, roll them into balls, then roll them in cocoa powder to make chocolate truffles.


1

I think you may well be over thinking this just a little. Water boils at 100c at sea level, sugar raises this temperature to around 110c depending on sugar content. Specifically, adding 1 gram molecular weight of nonionizing solute (like sugar) to 1 liter of water increases the boiling point by 0.52 degree Celsius (C). 1 gram molecular weight ...


1

It's a somewhat long shot, but if I were you, I'd give it a try again, using another form of vanilla (maybe precook a pod in the milk, then scrape out the seeds and add them), no corn syrup at all, and pay attention to using sweet butter, not cultured butter. Fudge is all about forming the right size crystals in the supersaturated sugar solution. From your ...


1

If condensed milk and chocolate chips are, basically, your only ingredients, make sure you are using sweetened condensed milk and not just evaporated milk. The 5-minute fudge recipe has been a staple of bake sales and church socials for as long as I can remember and should work on a 3-minute microwave cycle. Some recipes mix the types of chips (milk ...


1

Like you, I've found a wide variety of fats in fudge recipes. To name a few; The chocolate fudge recipe in The Joy of Cooking cookbook calls for both half-and-half and heavy cream. (From my home copy of that cookbook) On this Macinac Island website, there's a recipe that uses a combination of whole milk and Crisco (vegetable shortening). ...


1

Amazon have a couple: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silikomart-Silicone-Easy-Tablette-Mould/dp/B002VLQNBQ/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1320833045&sr=8-4 http://www.amazon.co.uk/ScrapCooking%C2%AE-Silicone-Bakeware-Chocolate-Tablets/dp/B0058GI0BW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1320833045&sr=8-2



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible