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23

It's not an old wives tale; it's actually true to a point. I can't say it better than Exploratorium, Science of Cooking Can weather affect candy making? Oddly enough, it can. Cooking candy syrup to the desired temperature means achieving a certain ratio of sugar to moisture in the candy. On a humid day, once the candy has cooled to the point where ...


9

This is actually (partially) true. It is more correct for fudge, not so much for candy overall. The texture of fudge and fondant depends a lot on the water contents where a 1% difference will matter and it will absorb moisture from the air during the cooling and beating period. So a high humidity will result in a runny fudge. Source: "On Food and Cooking", ...


3

I'm not a professional fudger, but here is my theory: one should add it to the boiling mixture. The reason is that butter has milk solids that are said to “burn” at low temperatures (somewhere in the range 120C-150C or 250F-300F) which just above the soft ball stage (113C or 235F) needed for making fudge. I interpret the burning to mean that those milk ...


3

Fudge doesn't need to be refrigerated. It is candy and nothing can grow in such a high concentration of sugar. The ambient humidity can mess with your fudge a bit if it isn't sealed. Too dry and the fudge will dry out and get crumbly on the outside. Too humid and the fudge will absorb enough water out of the air to melt. It is simple enough to tightly wrap ...


2

It's possible that you need to add more chocolate, or use a different type of chocolate. Dutch process cocoa has a much darker color than natural cocoa, for example. It's also possible that the color is being lightened by microscopic air bubbles. This can happen if you use a fluffy ingredient (such as marshmallow cream) or if you mix a lot of air into the ...


2

Probably it's the cocoa/chocolate used - there are some brands/breeds that are a lot darker than others and this shows in the final product. I have made the exact chocolate or marble cake with cocoa powder (same processing type) from different manufacturers and the results were optically quite different. This won't necessarily influence the taste, though, ...


2

The first question is how fussy you want to be about uniformity. Many people are satisfied just using a long, thin knife to score the fudge in roughly straight lines. If you want professional-level uniformity in the size of pieces, you'll need to lay out a grid with a straightedge, measuring equal distances on all four sides, and then use the straightedge ...


2

Fudge that just won't set can be decadent ice cream topping frosting for brownies (depending on how rich it is / the consistency you got) put it in a bowl and call it pudding! Top with a dollop of unsweetened whipped cream.


2

There are recipes that specifically use condensed and or evaporated milk as a shortcut to making fudge. It's not just a drop in replacement, it's a whole change in method. Just do a search for "easy fudge recipe" on Google to get examples of these fudge recipes that use condensed milk. To add my opinion however, the old fashioned cooking and churning method ...


1

Fudge really only has a shelf life of a week or two. First it will start to crystallize on the outside (which is actually very yummy in my opinion), but then it will start to grow mold. Good hygiene will lengthen the time before mold starts to grow, but ultimately fudge is not a preserved food and isn't meant to keep. The individual ingredients will keep ...


1

If it was true at one time, modern HVAC makes it moot. Also, it is specific to where the saying came from: "cool" and "humid" mean different things in different places, to the point where dry in Kauaʻi is more humid than wet in Indio. If it's raining outside but the heater is on because it's also cold outside, it's probably very dry inside. So the advice ...


1

I had an issue with my fudge coming out (after setting overnight) the same consistency as what you put over an ice cream sundae. Here's how I fixed it: I added more sweetened condensed milk (that's all, nothing else)and microwaved it with the "syrup" I made that was supposed to be fudge. After the first 2 minutes I stirred it really well and stuck it back ...



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