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3

Fudge doesn't need to be refrigerated. It is candy and nothing can grow in such a high concentration of sugar. The ambient humidity can mess with your fudge a bit if it isn't sealed. Too dry and the fudge will dry out and get crumbly on the outside. Too humid and the fudge will absorb enough water out of the air to melt. It is simple enough to tightly wrap ...


3

I'm not a professional fudger, but here is my theory: one should add it to the boiling mixture. The reason is that butter has milk solids that are said to “burn” at low temperatures (somewhere in the range 120C-150C or 250F-300F) which just above the soft ball stage (113C or 235F) needed for making fudge. I interpret the burning to mean that those milk ...


0

They advice against scaling, because cooking a batch twice as large will take more than twice as long. Nothing terrible will happen if you scale a recipe, but you will likely spend hours waiting by the stove for your fudge to reach the correct temperature. It's faster to just cook several small batches one after the other, or making several in parallell in ...


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Probably it's the cocoa/chocolate used - there are some brands/breeds that are a lot darker than others and this shows in the final product. I have made the exact chocolate or marble cake with cocoa powder (same processing type) from different manufacturers and the results were optically quite different. This won't necessarily influence the taste, though, ...


2

The first question is how fussy you want to be about uniformity. Many people are satisfied just using a long, thin knife to score the fudge in roughly straight lines. If you want professional-level uniformity in the size of pieces, you'll need to lay out a grid with a straightedge, measuring equal distances on all four sides, and then use the straightedge ...



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