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43

Abstract: Ganache is delicious, but not everyone eats dairy. We examined whether coconut milk can be used for the creation of a non-dairy ganache. We ran a series of experiments. The answer is that, with some creative techniques, you can use it, but it does not come anywhere near to the real thing. Introduction. Someone wrote a question on Seasoned advice ...


33

Inspired by rumtscho's incredibly detailed answer, which provided some informative although not quite "marketable" results, I set off on my own set of experiments. They are not quite finished, but I'll update this answer as more gets uncovered. First of all, I decided to start my experiments with coconut cream by itself because, why waste perfectly good ...


12

I was inspired to follow an Herve This recipe for Chocolate Chantilly using coconut milk. Here is a piccy of the end result. It looks and tastes how I imagine a whipped ganache would. I had to make some modifications to the original recipe. Here are the details: 60g semi-sweet (70%) chocolate 100 ml coconut milk 2 tbsp coconut butter cream One bowl of ...


6

There are four common ways to make fruit-flavored ganaches: Use the zest of the fruit Zest the fruit (works best for cirtus) and place the zest in the cream as it is brought to a simmer. Strain out the zest and use the cream. Use reduced juice Fruit juice from almost any fruit may be used as a liquid flavoring in ganache. The fruit juice should be heated ...


6

In addition to using too much cream, part of the problem is also that you're using chocolate chips for any purpose other than... chips. Chocolate chips are specifically made to be somewhat heat-resistant and have less cocoa butter than quality couverture or even compound or baker's chocolate, which means that any melted-chocolate product (including ganache) ...


5

I found an answer in McGee's 'On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen'. The basic ganache is 1:1 chocolate:cream (by weight). With lots of chocolate the emulsion can come apart. In 'Keys to good cooking' McGee describes how to restore a failed ganache. You put it over a double boiler and when it reaches 33ºC y stir it vigorously. If that ...


5

Liquid glucose is also commonly known as glucose syrup. It's half as sweet as cane sugar, and does not crystallize easily. This makes it popular among pastry chefs. Glucose syrup is almost always made from corn, but it can also come from potatoes, wheat, barley, rice, or cassava. When it is derived from corn it is commonly known in the USA as corn ...


5

First of all- glucose is a different sugar than table sugar. Corn syrup in the US is similar but has a few extra compounds. As far as I can tell it is used for similar reasons as liquid glucose in the EU. http://www.ochef.com/784.htm It is used for a couple reasons: it is thicker than sugar syrups. when making candy a little corn syrup can be added to the ...


4

I don't know the details of this particular recipe, so you'll have to excuse me if this comes across as a bit of a shot in the dark, but here are a few things that could have gone wrong: Grainy chocolate is usually a sign of seizing. White chocolate still contains cocoa butter and can still seize. Therefore it's important not to let any liquid touch the ...


4

White chocolate does not have starch, so it does not thicken the ganache, unlike dark chocolate. The proper proportion for white chocolate ganache is 45 to 60 ml of cream to 12 ounces of chocolate. You used 240 ml, which made it too runny. Use less cream and you will get a good consistency.


3

What you're missing is solids. 17g of cream (especially when you consider the high percentage of fat in cream in relation to solids) is not going to be enough against 60g of cocoa butter. Where are you from? In the US, milk solids (in the form of dried milk powder) are cheap compared to cocoa butter. Many high quality white chocolate brands do not contain ...


3

You'll definitely want to freeze the cake. Once it's frozen, use a spatula to apply a layer of ganache to the side that will be the bottom of the cake, then return it to the freezer. Once that has set, put the cake, ganache/bottom down on a cooling rack on top of a sheet of parchment paper or acetate. Slowly pour your melted ganache over the cake, guiding it ...


3

I think what you really are asking is what fats can be substituted for some of the cocoabutter that would give a lighter flavour or a flavour more suited to vanilla. Perhaps a blend of: coconut (high quality raw) palm (highly processed and bland) hydrogenated oils such as sunflower, rapeseed, soy (produced for confectionery manufacture) Liquid oils such ...


3

Use a soy and vegetable-fat based white chocolate like Oppenheimer Kosher white chocolate chips. They are quite sweet, but lag behind on the chocolate-y taste. They temper well and behave in most ways I've used them like regular chocolate chips, except that for white chocolate taste they are a bit bland. These would make a good vehicle for a lighter but ...


3

Disclaimer: I've never tried to make a ganache with olive oil, so take that into consideration as you read the following. First, I have to assume that you're trying to use olive oil to replace the cream that's normally used in making ganache, perhaps to make a non-dairy ganache. If that's not right, please clarify your question. Ganache is essentially an ...


2

I have tried this olive oil ganache, it works well and it is very stable. Recipe: Ingredients: 350g white chocolate (I used the Valrhona), 150g cream, 225g olive oil, a vanilla bean. Preparation: Heat the cream with the vanilla bean slowly (divide the vanilla bean in two, and take all the vanilla inside it). As it starts boiling, take it ...


2

A 1:1 ratio is probably a cake frosting ratio, not a truffle ratio (although it could be for molded or even piped truffles). If you're hand rolling your truffles, though, a 1:1 ratio is going to be difficult to work with. A couple of ideas: You say you're keeping the temperature under 120 degrees, but 120 is very hot for ganache. You might want to try the ...


2

Pierre Herme lists a recipe for this in his book Macarons. He just makes a white chocolate ganache with cream, and then blends in olive oil with a hand blender. The amounts suggest he is replacing much of the cream with oil (350g white chocolate, 150g cream, 225g olive oil). I've heard the flavor is amazing, but haven't made them myself.


2

Hohos get that perfectly smooth coating all over because they are dipped. And it is far from real chocolate; it is a formulation engineered for the purpose. This would be better done with tempered coverture (which would obviously best show off the quality of the chocolate) or a sugar based chocolate glaze, rather than ganache (although a stiff ganache ...


2

That may produce some sort of chocolate sauce or confection, but ganache is by definition made from cream and chocolate. Basic ganache is equal parts chocolate and cream by weight. Given that ganache is typically made with whipping cream (30% milkfat), the water being added is about 70% of the weight of the chocolate. Your product contains more water than ...


1

I asked a professional cake maker at the shop where I buy my cake ingredients and got told not to pour the ganache for the effect that I was trying to achieve. I got my results by using the traditional method of ganaching and then smoothing the ganache with my slightly wet hands (with hot water) and then smoothing it further by the hot knifing method.


1

Jolenealaska is right that you are missing solids: milk powder and sugar. Other powders won't give you the traditional taste and texture, and although they may turn out to be tasty, it will need lots of experimenting. Normal white chocolate is made of something like 1:1:1 cocoa butter to sugar to milk powder. If you change the ratio, you will have a ...


1

I can understand why you'd like to do this, however I would steer you clear of it. A roulade is very light, and if you coated it with a ganache you'd overpower it completely. Try drizzling a cherry, mint, or chocolate sauce over a slice in a fancy way instead, it will look and taste amazing.


1

White chocolate with a decent amount of cocoa solids should use a 4:1 ratio, that is four parts white chocolate to one part heavy cream with a fat content of 35%. This is for a good coat of ganache similar to dark chocolate ganache. I like to make a whipped cream ganache as it goes further and is not cloyingly sweet. You shouldn't need to add corn syrup or ...


1

I tried the first suggestion, 45-60 ml of heavy cream with 12 oz. of Nestle's White Chocolate chips and it worked great. Put chips in a glass bowl. Pour in cream. Stir to coat. Set microwave on 2:30 (two minutes thirty seconds) at half power. Micro :30 stir with a metal spoon. Micro another :30 and stir. *Repeat until out of time n micro. Stir with whisk ...


1

For a white chocolate ganache but with a vanilla taste, I would suggest tempering with chocolate itself. You must lower the chocolate taste but raise the vanilla taste,. I suggest melting white chocolate and mixing it with some shortening, then I suggest folding it in with marshmallow fluff and using vanilla emulsion. I would rather use emulsion than than ...


1

If you want a more solid structure to your olive oil ganache, you should probably try the Ferran Adria emulsification of olive oil first. It will have a more stable structure when mixed with the Pierre Hermés recipe. For each 100g of olive oil, add 6 Gr of Glice (these are flakes of Glycerine) Mix everything and warm in a small pan Don't over heat the ...


1

To whip coconut cream you need to take a can of Cream of Coconut and let it sit in the fridge up to 48 hours. The longer the better. Once you take it out, be careful not to shake it, turn it upside down or fiddle with it. All you need to do is open the can at the top. Scoop out only the cream and leave any liquid, the coconut water, at the bottom. If you use ...


1

I was browsing around on Rose Levy Beranbaum's blog, and found this very helpful post that covers exactly what you want to do: http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2011/04/alternatives_to_heavy_cream_ba.html



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