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79

Even with a whole bulb, break it into cloves. Put clove(s) on a cutting board. I usually cut off the root end of each clove. Lay a large chef's flat on the clove, then smack the knife to crush the clove. This breaks the skin of the clove and makes it much easier to peel.


54

The trick is that you're bruising the clove of garlic a little bit so the paper will release easier -- if you're using a bulb or less, it's not too bad to do the side of the knife press method. ... but if you're cooking up a recipe that calls for a dozen heads, there's an alternate trick: break the head into cloves put the cloves into a sealable ...


33

I smash it first to loosen up the papery skin, which makes it much easier to peel.


29

As a health inspector for over 20 years, I am astounded by the lack of awareness that food safety controls are based on science and not on individual inspectors' personal fears and bad moods. Botulism control is based on some of the following facts: botulinum spores are commonly found in soil and on vegetable surfaces, botulinum grows in low or no oxygen ...


18

The green in the center can have a bitter taste, and many chefs prefer to remove them. If the taste and color don't bother you, it will not cause problems for the dish. The brown end tends to a have a harder consistency than the rest of the clove, so may cause a problem depending on how you cook the garlic. If you're cooking it in a manner that leads to a ...


18

Whether you are questioning it or not, what you are doing is not safe. Your dipping oil, while I am sure it is wonderful, is a textbook example of how to create botulism toxin. You should consider taking a sanitation course at your local community college. I did and, while I knew most of what was there, it does reinforce the knowledge. You will not be ...


17

Taste-wise there will be little to not difference in the result. Just be careful to use the proper ratio of garlic to salt (generally 3-to-1 salt to garlic powder).


16

Yes, it is different. Does it matter? It depends. If you're going to use garlic in a stew or anything else that would 'dissolve' the regular garlic anyway, it doesn't really matter all that much in my opinion. If you want to preserve the texture and/or create a more 'urgent' garlic flavour in short-cooked food, I'd go with fresh. Sidenote: most of the ...


16

As far as I'm aware there are a few possible reasons for this to occur. Young garlic can turn green when the presence of an acid, in this case the butter. As a possible chemical reaction between the garlic and certain types of cooking utensil, such as cast iron or copper. It will sometimes change colour if it has prolonged exposure to bright sunlight. ...


16

Sure! Most recipes for the darker Oaxacan moles will include both cocoa powder and garlic.


15

@Adam A is close -- it's not an issue of surface area on potency, it's an issue of damage to the garlic. The 'strong' taste of garlic comes from a reaction as chemicals are released so they can mix (alliin and alliinase) When you cook the garlic whole (as you would for roasted garlic), you will never get this reaction, as you'll break down the chemicals. ...


15

I guess it depends upon the definition of "crushed" If by crushed, you mean using a garlic press, then there is quite a difference between chopped and crushed garlic. When you crush garlic, no need for a garlic press, the flat of a knife and a little salt is all that's needed, you release the essential oils, resulting in a stronger flavour. You can also ...


15

Congratulations, you accidentally made allioli, a Catalan emulsified sauce requiring only garlic and olive oil to thicken and emulsify. Unfortunately, it's harder to make and less stable than the other aiolis (garlic mayonnaises), which include egg yolks as emulsifiers. This is probably why you are having difficulty replicating it. To make it more ...


14

Chopped and crushed garlic have different flavors in dishes. The smaller the pieces the garlic is made into (with crushed being super small), the more pungent and bitter the flavors.  Several food bloggers have reported their experiments on testing the differences.   This sounds surprising, but members of the Allium genus (which includes garlic, onion, leek ...


14

Whether or not it's a good idea is subjective, but the Chinese seem to break that rule a lot! For example, Northeastern Chinese sweet and sour pork (guō bāo ròu) is characterized by an intense ginger flavor. The Sichuan classic twice cooked pork (huí guō ròu) calls for boiling the pork with ginger. A common condiment for beef dishes/sauces is black bean ...


13

The smell of garlic is due to sulfur compounds. When you rub your hands against stainless steel, the iron of the stainless steel will react with some small volume of those compounds, but much more will remain in your hands. Rubbing your hands against an iron object does not work. The sulfur smell compounds are water soluble to slightly water soluble, so ...


13

The problem, to clarify, is that garlic cloves are neutral in pH, and have water in them, perfect for botulism to grow if they're stuck in an anaerobic place like a bottle of oil. So you need to do something to the garlic before soaking it in the oil. One thing you can do is to pickle the garlic in vinegar for a few days, then put the pickled cloves in oil. ...


13

I make garlic paste quite often, using this technique I saw on Bobby Flay. Put the whole clove on the board. Lay knife flat, and smack it with your hand. Remove paper and root. Dice finely. Sprinkle with the quantity of salt your recipe calls for. With the knife relatively flat, grind the garlic into the salt with the knife. Typically, I'll make a pass in ...


13

You don't have to peel garlic before using a garlic press, but doing so lets you press more garlic before you have to clean out the skins and so forth. If you only need to press a clove or two, there is not a lot of reason to peel first, since you will just have to clean the press out once.


13

That is actually quite controversial in its own way. If you are going to use a garlic press, you should cut the root end off the clove (you can do that a bulb at a time if desired) and give the individual cloves a bit of a crush with the side of a big knife before you press them. If you do that and you have a good garlic press, you can then just pluck the ...


12

The most common data point seems to be that any moisture level below 35% will inhibit growth of the C. Botulinum spores that cause botulism. It's hard to point to true scientific sources because they tend to be protected, but if you spend a few minutes on Google (try this query) you'll see that it is in fact confirmed in several of the scientific journals. ...


12

Both may be preferable as they provide different garlic flavours. Fresh garlic is sharp, and has bite. It tastes fresh, and works especially well with other bold flavours and fresh ingredients. Granulated (roasted) garlic is garlicy, but nowhere near as sharp. It tastes more like the prepared garlic flavour we've all become accustomed to. It's a mellower, ...


12

Ditch the cream and onions, and don't use tomato paste. Take a whole bulb of garlic, peel the cloves and leave them whole. Heat a cup of good olive oil over medium heat and add the garlic, stirring occasionally until very lightly brown and blistered: be careful not to burn it! Then add 4 28oz cans of chopped/crushed Italian tomatoes and some chilli, being ...


11

It's not so much the taste as the texture. If they haven't been sauted first, the onions stay relatively crunchy during the rest of the cooking. The same is true of the garlic, but you'd usually have cut the garlic into much smaller pieces so it doesn't take as long to soften up, hence kicking the onion off first and adding the garlic a bit later.


11

When crushed or chopped, garlic releases mercaptins from within its cells (sulfur containing compounds). Sulfur readily forms bonds with other amino acids, notably cystine which itself contains a sulfur atom in its chemical structure. When two sulfhydryl groups (S-H) come into close proximity, a disulfide bridge can be formed, creating a relatively strong ...


11

From UC Davis: (http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/pdf/7231.pdf) "Question: Why did my garlic turn blue? Answer: Garlic contains anthocyanins, water-soluble pigments that can turn blue or purple under acidic conditions. This is a variable phenomenon that is more pronounced for immature garlic but can differ among cloves within a single head of garlic. If you ...


10

Roasted garlic will get a slightly sweet flavor, dipped in a chocolate fondue can be wonderful and I have seen a recipe for garlic chocolate chip cookies. http://www.food.com/recipe/garlic-chocolate-chip-cookies-28771



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