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14

Where do you live? European Pyrex is made from borosilicate glass, the same as in laboratory's equipment; American Pyrex is made from common soda-lime glass. If you are in America, don't bother trying it at all; soda-lime glass is sensitive to thermal shock. Even though it's tempered for kitchenware, it is nowhere near good enough for the burner. In ...


12

We have recently remodelled our kitchen and moved from a gas hob to an induction hob. In general it cooks much the same as gas and you get similar levels of control over the temperature. One style of cooking that is not recommended is 'slide' cooking as this will likely scratch your hob surface - this can be mitigated by putting a piece of parchment paper ...


9

From the PyrexLove FAQ: Is it all right to use my vintage Pyrex directly on the stove? We’d like to just nip this one in the bud and say - NO. Some pieces actually say “Not for stovetop”, but we never put vintage pyrex bowls, casseroles or whatever directly on the stove, ever. You can try it, but we’d rather not risk it. But we do get a ...


9

The actual action of soaking is what does most of the work. Most legumes have complex oligosaccharides, a type of complex sugar. Digestion of this complex sugar is what causes flatulence. By soaking your beans will help remove some of this excess sugar. Be sure you discard the soaking water. Though it is often said that adding baking soda helps I've yet ...


8

Can I convince you that electric is better? No, I can't, because I don't think it is. The issue I have is related to how long it takes to warm up (and cool down). Electric cook tops just don't respond quickly. Little too hot? Too bad, nothing you can do about it (in time to save a dish that's starting to burn anyway). Not hot enough? Check back in 2 or 3 ...


7

I don't think that you'll get the results that you expect. My experience includes an MSR Whisperlite International backpacking stove (white gas), and Coleman two-burner stoves in both white gas and propane variants. Anecdotally, the backpacking stove has limited control, while the two-burner stoves don't quite have the oomph of a real gas stove. The ...


7

Just tried it - answer is no. Wish i'd read this before it cracked because of the heat.


7

This is completely normal and expected. Indian pickle is fermented. One of the by products of that fermentation is gas. The salt keeps undesirable bacteria from growing. In the future you should use a container that can be less tightly closed and allow some of the gas to vent as it ferments. You wouldn't want a bottle to burst.


6

Well, with an electric you get Modestly less fire hazard No gas leak hazard but I'd generally take gas.


6

What the others say is true, but ABSOLUTELY NOT TRUE for an electric induction cooker!! I used to think gas was better until I also moved into a flat with no gas. I was soon sick of it but I discovered induction and changed the basic electric cooker for an induction one. Now I know that an induction cooker is even better than gas because: It responds ...


6

I found it is much easier to keep the heat quite low with an electric stove. As for a quick response when the pot is too hot, just slide it off the burner. This is particularly easy with the flat tops.


6

The main difference is speed that it changes temperature. So when you turn the hob on it is at the heat you turned it to almost immediately, if you turn it down it is cooler that second. This won't take long to get used to but if you have recipes which say something along the lines of "Bring to the boil before reducing to a simmer" you can now do exactly ...


6

Silly, silly me. As Jefromi suggested earlier, the largest contributor to the fact it takes that much longer is probably the fact that the eggs are at a different themselves at the moment I put them in. I used to store eggs in a cupboard; now I store them in the refrigerator. That is not to say the other factors mentioned by Martha and Sklivvz don't add to ...


6

Is there a difference in altitude between where you live now and where you used to live? The heat of a gas and an electric stove should be the same, but boiling temperature differs. The higher the altitude, the lower the boiling point, since it's a factor of air pressure. (More explanations from Wikipedia.) Water only boils at 100C at sea level. This site ...


6

The stove top griddles I have used worked equally poorly on electric as on gas.


6

In addition to what rheone said, I have noticed that using baking soda kind of softens food. A characteristica example of this is Use baking soda in green vegetables to keep them green after cooking is done which isn't the best solution because just a minute is enough to miss it and eat a soup instead of green vegetables. I have also noticed that if ...


6

For reliable baking you need to know what your oven is doing. If the internal temperature fluctuates wildly, you're dead in the water: replace it. If it's fairly stable, spend some time learning it. Get a decent oven thermometer; set the oven's temperature control to, say, 350 degrees (F) and let it settle; check what the oven thermometer says. Then work ...


5

I find it amusing that your range warns you the cooking ring will work as intended. It's supposed to be heat trap, and focus heat on the bottom of the wok. That said, they are also correct that it may discolor the burner grate. I can't really say what your grates are made from, and many cooking materials discolor at high temperatures. I think the main ...


5

For your missing equipment, calibration, and control, you will have to substitute vigilance and technique. Basically, if you parbake your crust, you should get something good. Turn on your oven, probably as hot as it'll go. Unless you have a thick crust and a very intense oven, it'll be hard to get too hot. Roll out your dough into a baking pan/cooking ...


5

Summary: Baking soda is mostly used to soften the beans faster and decrease cooking time by increasing pH. In some scenarios, it has been shown to aid in breaking down gas-causing sugars as well. Higher concentrations of baking soda and/or pressure cooking may be needed to make this latter effect significant. In most cases, an increased soaking time will ...


5

Depends on what you mean by "cost effective", and what expectations you have of cooking evenness. A solid fuel stove will probably be cheapest (grandma style wood or coal oven), followed by a resistive electric stove and the most expensive stove being induction electric. This covers the initial cost of the stove itself. The quality of heating goes along ...


4

This seems nonsensical to try with your home stove. You are correct, the rate of gas output is directly controlled by the knobs. In a typical home stove, drilling holes will not increase the gas output. It would affect the gas to air ratio, but I doubt it would result in an increase of temperature, and more likely a decrease.


4

Good electric stoves often put out the same or more power (BTUs/hr) than gas stoves, and they are more efficient at transmitting the heat, as it is via conduction not radiation. This means that on a good electric stove, water will boil faster, heavy pans will heat up faster, etc. By a "good electric stove" I mean one that does not have a glass pane over ...


4

Overall, most of the enthusiastic cooks I know prefer gas because of the better (ie. instant) temperature control. However, one downside of gas ranges is that they often have trouble with providing very low heat because if you turn it too low, the flame will go out. Some gas stove tops will have a special "simmer" burner that is smaller and that you can ...


4

No. Tried it today melting some butter on a low heat and it exploded violently sending glass shards in a 1 metre radius. Suprised me as I remembered using Pyrex test tubes over a Bunsen burner in science class. Won't be trying that again. Epic fail!


4

Dutch oven (a proper cast iron one, mind you) Put your dutch oven on the stove top with the lid on, and turn on the heat until it gets hot Place the thing(s) to be baked inside (but not directly touching the sides or bottom; a little rack or other standoff will be helpful) Put the lid back on and turn the heat way down Wait. And this is a bit of a problem ...


4

1) I do not think so, the technique was described in e.g. modernist cuisine, they suggest using a ISI siphone and if I can remember correctly does not describe any other tool. Any pressure chamber would work, if you have access to one :-) 2) I have something like this which can be charged with both soda and cream charges, that is what I woudl suggest. (mine ...


4

It's possible that it's designed to conduct less heat from the bottom. Many gas ovens have the flue in the bottom and the heating is only from below in the oven. To make things more even, most electric ovens have an element at the top and one on the bottom. Speaking of bottom, the bottom line is that you should be ok. If you find the bottom of you cake ...


4

In terms of typical baked goods, radiant heat is radiant heat. Different ovens are not going to provide you with different heat. However...a couple of things to consider: Most consumer ovens are fairly inaccurate in terms of actual temperature vs. temp. on the dial. Get an oven thermometer and keep it in your oven so that you know how "off" yours is, ...



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