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The best advice here is the recommendation of an oven thermometer. I suddenly had issues with a fairly new stove that had baked superbly. Many disasters until I did two things: store my flour, sugar and other dry baking goods in the refrigerator (my area is exceptionally humid these days) and purchase a thermometer. Turns out my oven was 25 degrees hotter ...


1

15/16 months and now you're questioning the oven. A new oven with new features is ALWAYS a good thing, but you will still need to adapt to it, and it's not going to be perfect. I've baked in a variety of commercial ovens and home ovens and each has its issues. It's easy to say "of course" steam, or "of course" convection, or gas or electric or whatever. ...


0

WHY ADDING SODIUM BICARBONATE SOFTENS BEANS AND LENTILS: The reason is that as beans age, there is dehydration (My Brazilian mom used to tell that the difference between an old crop bean (cheaper) and a new crop, is the as you fingernail pinch them, the older one is smaller than the new crop one's). Soaking with Sodium Bicarbonate in the cold water takes ...


4

In terms of typical baked goods, radiant heat is radiant heat. Different ovens are not going to provide you with different heat. However...a couple of things to consider: Most consumer ovens are fairly inaccurate in terms of actual temperature vs. temp. on the dial. Get an oven thermometer and keep it in your oven so that you know how "off" yours is, ...


6

For reliable baking you need to know what your oven is doing. If the internal temperature fluctuates wildly, you're dead in the water: replace it. If it's fairly stable, spend some time learning it. Get a decent oven thermometer; set the oven's temperature control to, say, 350 degrees (F) and let it settle; check what the oven thermometer says. Then work ...



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