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41

If your stock turns to jelly in the fridge, it means you did it right! Simmering the bones breaks down the collagen and turns it into gelatin; that's the very essence of stock-making. The gelatin is exactly what you want from the stock; at low temperatures it has a very jelly-like consistency, but at higher temperatures it melts and provides a very rich ...


27

This depends on what you mean by a gelatin "substitute". What you have to understand is that while most hydrocolloids have gelling and stabilizing properties, they are not simply interchangeable. You can't substitute one of them 1-for-1 where you need gelatin and expect everything to just work. A great place to start would be the Hydrocolloid Recipe ...


17

Without further qualification, if someone refers to themselves as vegetarian (in America), the general assumption is that they are lacto-ovo vegetarian. That means they don't eat animal products that require killing the animal, but eggs and dairy are fine. Gelatin comes from a dead animal (unless they start harvesting it with arthroscopic probes :), so it is ...


14

What you're observing is called syneresis. Most gelling agents such as gelatin and agar will tend to lose water over time, especially as the temperature goes up (i.e. from refrigerator to room temperature). What is in fact happening is that the squares are drying out and pushing water out to the surface, which is why the powdered sugar gets soggy or even ...


10

Vegetarianism is not clearly defined, but a catch-all for various dietary choices. Some vegetarians, will just simply not eat red meat, but would eat fish and poultry. Gelatin and Rennet (found in cheese) may or may not be included. I have friends who don't eat mammals, and others who won't eat anything warm-blooded. Lacto-Ovo vegetarians will eat eggs ...


9

It's the refinement that's the real issue: anyone who's braised a big joint of meat knows that a couple of hours of low-temperature stewing will net you large amounts of gelatin. Hooves and antlers were the preferred media, but anything that's got a bunch of collagen will work. Talk to your butchers shop, and see if you can buy some bones. Refinement was ...


9

Gelatin is not vegetarian as it is made from dead animals... any vegetarian, from ovo-lacto in the liberal end to the fruitarian on the extreme end should have an aversion. A person who eats fish and/or poultry is by no means a vegetarian, just a selective omnivore. If you need a similar product fruit pectin is a good alternative.


9

For your application you may want to use agar.  It is easy to find, gels at room temperature, and will remain so to about 90C.  The acidity of the orange juice will slowly (a few days) break down the agar, but it should give you enough time for a dish.  Other agents include: sodium alginate carrageenan  xantham gum A good description of the gelling ...


8

You'd have to use a whole lot of gelatin to ruin the taste. My guess is that when you experienced that in the past, you were using (perhaps unknowingly) flavoured gelatin or "dessert gelatin" instead of ordinary, pure, unflavoured gelatin crystals or sheets. Erik is correct in that gelatin does not do well with tropical fruits (including mangoes), nor ...


8

Gelatin sheets are soaked in cold-to-room-temp water in order to soften and rehydrate them slightly before stirring them into the (often hot) food. If you were to try to stir a sheet of gelatin directly into hot liquid, you'd find that it behaves a lot like cornstarch. It clumps up immediately and produces unpleasant-to-eat chunks that only a blender and a ...


8

Yes! I was able to make a panna cotta using this product in a standard recipe with some minor changes. Just incorporate the Jell Dessert powder where the gelatin is called for and subtract 1/4-cup from the prescribed sugar. I started with this recipe on JoyofBaking.com. The recipe, like most I've seen, calls for one standard 1/4-ounce packet of gelatin. ...


7

I'm looking for the online reference, but I remember reading in Cook's Illustrated that they were able to substitute a bit of gelatin to mimic the mouth-feel of homemade stock. I did find a beef stew recipe that used gelatin. Based on how you described your recipe, I would say that the long cooking of chicken bones is indeed what's missing. You might get a ...


7

If you want to make real Turkish delight, use cornstarch and only cornstarch. Nowhere on the Balkan have I seen a gelatine-thickened Turkish delight. No Turkish person will recognize a gelatine-thickened candy as lokum. I would go as far as to insist that aromatzied sugar syrup+gelatine = gummi bear, while aromatized sugar syrup+cornstarch = Turkish delight, ...


7

Anything that doesn't survive the 150° C oven is not going to survive a 1500° C blow torch. Gelatin has a melting point of about 35° C, maximum. It is a thermoreversible reaction, unlike the coagulation of eggs, which is thermoirreversible. Eggs set well in an oven, which is why they are used in so many baking recipes; gelatin does not, which is why it is ...


7

What you need for the conversion of collagen is a certain amount of energy. It is a complicated process - the melting point is around 70°C for the type of collagen contained in beef, but the melting does not happen instantly once the meat reaches 70°C. In a pressure cooking, you can apply the same amount of energy in a shorter amount of time. This is not ...


6

To me, the definitive guide to all these gelling agents is "Texture", the free e-book at khymos.org (which I know about because of this site, by the way). It says that mango is an inhibitor to the working of gelatin, so gelatin won't help as much as you might hope. Having said that, some of the example recipes do use gelatin, so it might still help enough. ...


6

From the National Center for Home Food Preservation: Making Jelly without Added Pectin Making Jam without Added Pectin Use a mixture of 3/4 ripe and 1/4 under-ripe high-pectin fruits. Under-ripe or just barely ripe fruit contains the most pectin. Cook the fruit with cores and peels to add extra pectin (but do remove stems or pits). Put through a sieve ...


5

You can simply simmer off enough liquid until any fruit is thick. For example, I make a blueberry sauce for pancakes and blintzes by just putting some blueberries, sugar, and a pinch of salt in a saucepan, bringing to a boil, and then reducing heat to low until it is as thick as I want. When cooled in the fridge, it will be pretty jammy. (This isn't a ...


5

As Chris says, its to do with the setting time of the gelatine vs the bubbly. Ensure all of your containers are chilled (maybe even frozen? - I put mine in 3/4 hours before making the actual dish) before you add the (chilled) champagne and get it into the bottom of the fridge as quick as you can. I suspect though cannot prove also that a smaller container ...


5

A gel is any liquid (usually) or gaseous medium suspended in a solid three-dimensional mesh which entraps the medium so that it does not flow. By way of (somewhat flawed analogy) think of a giant role of bubble wrap. Its mostly air. But the plastic keeps the air from flowing at a large scale. Gels can range from very soft to very hard. New modern ...


4

It really has to do with the amount of time between the addition of the champagne, and when the gelatine sets, thus capturing a bubble. Champagne releases gas fairly quickly, and gelatine sets slowly. I would probably do the main preparation with a comparable white wine, and refrigerate it until nearly set, and then add the soda water for sparkle.


4

I think there are a few components to a good stock mouthfeel + flavour. You may be able to approximate these without actual stock with a bit of hackery: Use flavourless, commercial gelatine and a small amount of saturated fat (bacon grease). This would simulate both the fat from the dark meat, and the gelatine from the bone. Brown up some starches and ...


4

Agar is not a good choice for pudding because it makes a brittle gel and it won't melt in your mouth at body temperature. What you want for pudding is a starch based thickener. What we call pudding in the US at least is typically thickened with cornstarch. Modified starches like Ultra-Tex 3 can also work well. Are you thinking of something more along the ...


4

"Texture" the hydrocolloid recipe collection says the typical concentration of agar agar is: 0.2% will set 0.5% gives firm jelly How much gelatin you need depends on the bloom (strength) of your gelatin. Page 82 tells you how to convert measurements from one bloom strength to another.


4

The difference between activating them is important if you want to use gelatin instead of agar. Gelatin is made of proteins and peptides and agar is a polysaccharide. Gelatin should not be boiled, because it breaks down. Agar needs 95 deg C to dissolve, so usually it is simply boiled. This means, that if your receipe calls for boiling the agar with stuff ...


4

The packs typically contain the equivalent of 15mL of gelatine and are in powder form. Each pack is measured to set 500mL or two cups of liquid. As far as weight, it feels like about 6-7 grams of gelatin. The dominant brand seems to be knox. As for the bloom, I'm not really sure as I haven't seen it published on the label. However, I have actually ...


3

Take a large pot or pan and flip it over (flat side up) and place the item on top. This will improve the speed a lot. Of course the more conductive the pan the better -- copper or aluminum pans will work best. This also works for defrosting items (for people with a fridge). If you only have ceramic bowls this might not be such a good solution since ...


3

It makes no difference whether you use sheet or powdered. Just make sure to use the right amount. It should be given on the package, like "this sachet is enough for 500 ml liquid". You can try to use less than indicated for a softer texture, but if you don't use enough, it will stay liquid, so you may need to experiment until you get it right. You can't ...


3

You might try modified tapioca starch, if you can heat the base of the jelly enough to set the starch; I've only used the regular form, but the processing of "modified" tapioca is supposed to remain stable at temperature (somewhere near 50C) I'm also not sure how well tapioca handles acids (which 'orange jelly' might be); I know agar has issues with acid. ...


3

Ever notice that if you squeeze all the air out of a partially full soda bottle, it doesn't go flat? Me thinks the negative pressure keeps the carbon dioxide dissolved (which is odd when compared to the usual positive pressure we experience when opening a soda bottle). As such, you might try a food vacuum system (e.g. Food Saver) to apply negative pressure ...



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