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28

This depends on what you mean by a gelatin "substitute". What you have to understand is that while most hydrocolloids have gelling and stabilizing properties, they are not simply interchangeable. You can't substitute one of them 1-for-1 where you need gelatin and expect everything to just work. A great place to start would be the Hydrocolloid Recipe ...


9

For your application you may want to use agar.  It is easy to find, gels at room temperature, and will remain so to about 90C.  The acidity of the orange juice will slowly (a few days) break down the agar, but it should give you enough time for a dish.  Other agents include: sodium alginate carrageenan  xantham gum A good description of the gelling ...


9

It's the refinement that's the real issue: anyone who's braised a big joint of meat knows that a couple of hours of low-temperature stewing will net you large amounts of gelatin. Hooves and antlers were the preferred media, but anything that's got a bunch of collagen will work. Talk to your butchers shop, and see if you can buy some bones. Refinement was ...


8

You'd have to use a whole lot of gelatin to ruin the taste. My guess is that when you experienced that in the past, you were using (perhaps unknowingly) flavoured gelatin or "dessert gelatin" instead of ordinary, pure, unflavoured gelatin crystals or sheets. Erik is correct in that gelatin does not do well with tropical fruits (including mangoes), nor ...


8

Yes! I was able to make a panna cotta using this product in a standard recipe with some minor changes. Just incorporate the Jell Dessert powder where the gelatin is called for and subtract 1/4-cup from the prescribed sugar. I started with this recipe on JoyofBaking.com. The recipe, like most I've seen, calls for one standard 1/4-ounce packet of gelatin. ...


7

I'm not sure if you can with all fruits, but some fruits, like fruits like apples, blackberries, gooseberries, crab apples, cranberries, and grapes are naturally high in pectin and might produce the desired effect without extra help.


7

There are a number of different ways in which gelling agents are classified. Off the top of my head: Viscosity (firmness/thickness) of solution and gel forms Thermoreversible/irreversible (does it "melt"?) Hysteresis (water loss) Hydration, melting, and setting points Appearance (in particular transparency) Sensitivity to heat, cold, alcohol, and pH ...


6

Grant Achatz does quite a lot with popcorn at Alinea. One of his recipes is available as part of the preview of his book on Google Books and is just about readable. Looks like he goes with the steeping method (although he's using water). I ate at Alinea recently and there was a popcorn soup on the menu that tasted exactly like popcorn, so it's probably a ...


6

From the National Center for Home Food Preservation: Making Jelly without Added Pectin Making Jam without Added Pectin Use a mixture of 3/4 ripe and 1/4 under-ripe high-pectin fruits. Under-ripe or just barely ripe fruit contains the most pectin. Cook the fruit with cores and peels to add extra pectin (but do remove stems or pits). Put through a sieve ...


6

To me, the definitive guide to all these gelling agents is "Texture", the free e-book at khymos.org (which I know about because of this site, by the way). It says that mango is an inhibitor to the working of gelatin, so gelatin won't help as much as you might hope. Having said that, some of the example recipes do use gelatin, so it might still help enough. ...


5

This is definitely one of those times where I wouldn't recommend substituting agar for gelatin; it's simply far too stiff for marshmallows. If you can get hold of some methyl cellulose, it works great for marshmallows. Unlike other gelling agents, methyl cellulose hydrates in cold water and sets when heated, so you can roast it with direct heat and it will ...


5

I've seen it done with agar-agar on the Danish show "Spise med Price". They made spaghetti with lemon balm. They sucked the warm liquid with agar-agar in it up with a syringe, pushed the liquid into a thin plastic tube, which they lowered into ice water. Before they served it, they pushed the spaghetti out of the tube with the syringe. As for a flavor ...


5

You can simply simmer off enough liquid until any fruit is thick. For example, I make a blueberry sauce for pancakes and blintzes by just putting some blueberries, sugar, and a pinch of salt in a saucepan, bringing to a boil, and then reducing heat to low until it is as thick as I want. When cooled in the fridge, it will be pretty jammy. (This isn't a ...


5

To summarize the points of Aaronut's answer and provide a framework for answering: 'Gluten is responsible for elasticity of dough, which is perceived as chewiness','The "rising" in baked goods is essentially just stretching of the gluten network', 'Gluten is also exceptionally good at both absorbing and retaining moisture' Dough's rising is ...


5

A gel is any liquid (usually) or gaseous medium suspended in a solid three-dimensional mesh which entraps the medium so that it does not flow. By way of (somewhat flawed analogy) think of a giant role of bubble wrap. Its mostly air. But the plastic keeps the air from flowing at a large scale. Gels can range from very soft to very hard. New modern ...


5

An agar gel sets as it cools, like almost every other thermoreversible gel - including those made from gelatin, carrageenan, and various types of gellan and pectin. One of the properties of almost any gel is that the gelling agent needs to be dispersed and then dissolved in the solution, otherwise you'd never be able to mix it - you'd just instantly get a ...


4

It might be that the interior part of the Jelly Bellys are messing up the texture of the finished product. Have you tried just infusing them long enough for the sugar coating to dissolve, and then straining out the jelly like interiors? I believe that the sugar part is what contains all the flavor, and the "guts" are just plain. HTH!


4

Using popped corn may be a bit too literal. What you really need is the flavor of corn and of butter. Butter flavor should be easy to incorporate using real butter, though you may want to use clarified. For the corn flavor, I would try using some roasted corn. Fresh would be ideal, though you could probably get away with frozen. This sounds like an ...


4

Check out this PDF called 'Texture: A Hydrocolloid Recipe Collection'. It has some recipes for various types of spaghetti using agar and other hydrocolloids. Since agar tends to dissolve under heat, it also has a recipe to make noodles with methyl cellulose which gels when heated. They suggest using a syringe to make your strands of spaghetti. It may be ...


4

I don't think I've ever seen a marshmallow recipe without corn syrup, except maybe for methocel marshmallows. But assuming these are standard gelatin marshmallows, you can dredge them in confectioner's sugar and that will make them easier to work with. Don't "dust" them, actually dredge them, otherwise you'll just end up with globs of wet sugar attached to ...


4

Agar is not a good choice for pudding because it makes a brittle gel and it won't melt in your mouth at body temperature. What you want for pudding is a starch based thickener. What we call pudding in the US at least is typically thickened with cornstarch. Modified starches like Ultra-Tex 3 can also work well. Are you thinking of something more along the ...


4

Blueberries, and especially underripe blueberries, have a lot of pectin. Blueberries have about .4g per 100g compared to apples which have .5g. As you suspected this is almost definitely causing the problem. Many blueberry jam recipes consist of just heating pureed blueberries with sugar and acid- no added pectin needed. When you heated your pureed ...


4

"Texture" the hydrocolloid recipe collection says the typical concentration of agar agar is: 0.2% will set 0.5% gives firm jelly How much gelatin you need depends on the bloom (strength) of your gelatin. Page 82 tells you how to convert measurements from one bloom strength to another.


4

The difference between activating them is important if you want to use gelatin instead of agar. Gelatin is made of proteins and peptides and agar is a polysaccharide. Gelatin should not be boiled, because it breaks down. Agar needs 95 deg C to dissolve, so usually it is simply boiled. This means, that if your receipe calls for boiling the agar with stuff ...


4

Removing a custard (which is what creme brulee) is from its form or mold does not definitely require agar agar. Flan, which is famous from a number of cuisines, is an unmolded custard. While experimentation would be required, it is highly likely that if you use a silicone based flexible form, and make a fairly stiff custard, you will be able to gently and ...


3

You might try modified tapioca starch, if you can heat the base of the jelly enough to set the starch; I've only used the regular form, but the processing of "modified" tapioca is supposed to remain stable at temperature (somewhere near 50C) I'm also not sure how well tapioca handles acids (which 'orange jelly' might be); I know agar has issues with acid. ...


3

I doubt very much that you'll be able to substitute any amount of arrowroot for carrageenan. Arrowroot can substitute for other starches, but carrageenan is a gum. If you want to be able to melt the cheese easily, gelatin is your best bet, and you should be able make a 1:1 substitution (although the process is obviously different - you need to bloom it ...


3

It doesn't seem like you can get a soft, elastic gel using agar, Modernist Cuisine lists an elastic one but classifies it as firm(4-140): Texture Firmness Gelling Agents Scaling ---------------------------------------------------- Elastic Firm Locust Bean Gum 0.15% Agar 0.10% ...



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