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8

Yes! I was able to make a panna cotta using this product in a standard recipe with some minor changes. Just incorporate the Jell Dessert powder where the gelatin is called for and subtract 1/4-cup from the prescribed sugar. I started with this recipe on JoyofBaking.com. The recipe, like most I've seen, calls for one standard 1/4-ounce packet of gelatin. ...


5

An agar gel sets as it cools, like almost every other thermoreversible gel - including those made from gelatin, carrageenan, and various types of gellan and pectin. One of the properties of almost any gel is that the gelling agent needs to be dispersed and then dissolved in the solution, otherwise you'd never be able to mix it - you'd just instantly get a ...


3

The viscosity of a xanthan solution is virtually unaffected by temperatures from freezing point to boiling point of pure water and it hydrates rapidly in cold water. You don't need to let it sit on its own and the temperature doesn't matter. The viscosity of a xanthan solution lowers when whisking or stirring, a process known as shear thinning. When you ...


3

It doesn't seem like you can get a soft, elastic gel using agar, Modernist Cuisine lists an elastic one but classifies it as firm(4-140): Texture Firmness Gelling Agents Scaling ---------------------------------------------------- Elastic Firm Locust Bean Gum 0.15% Agar 0.10% ...


2

It depends on how you are using it. Most likely, as the other users suggest, you must heat it when combining with other ingredients so they bond together via the heat, and your recipe will set into a gel by chilling the mixture. For instance, if you are creating a silky gel topping - less firm (example: raspberry foam topped Prosecco), it is also best to use ...


2

Besides the points made by derivative and Michael, I noticed that it helps to mix the xanthan gum first with some other dry powder and to hydrate it by mixing it at very high speeds. When I use it in a salad dressing I mix well some sugar (5 times by weight) with the xanthan before pouring it into the food processor. The sugar separates the xanthan grains ...


2

Are you measuring your xanthan gum accurately, with a scale that goes down at least to tenths of a gram? The practical range of application is about 0.05% to 0.8% of the weight of the liquid. Much above that and it will be very snotty and unpleasant. You've got to measure it quite precisely if you want reproducible results. If you need a scale for modernist ...


2

I've tried adding gelatine, tapioca, corn starch to agar to make it less brittle. None of them work very well until they start to become the major component of the gel. Adding glycerin or sugar syrup is also fruitless.


1

About two years ago I read about the "ultimate chocolate mousse" from Heston Blumenthal. Interestingly, the recipe only calls for two ingredients: bittersweet chocolate and water. Sugar can be added, but it is optional. It is all in the technique. You use an approach that is similar to tempering chocolate and then whip. Place a mixing bowl over a bowl ...


1

If you are able to get hold of it, I have used vegetarian gelatin substitute in the past, and found it to be fine. I'm in the UK, and most supermarkets stock something like Dr. Oetker Vege-Gel or their own brand (often called vetetarian gel, rather than gelatin(e), to avoid confusion). If you are looking for an agar conversion, Joy of Baking suggests that a ...


1

Gelatine has nothing to do with a mousse. That means it's no problem to find a recipe without ;) . I'm doing Mousse au Chocolat like that: melt 200-250gr (more is better for stability) of chocolate (70%+ cacao) in a baine-marie whip 400gr of cream whip one egg yolk in a baine-marie until fluffy * mix the chocolate into the egg yolk carefully fold the ...



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