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11

I am German, let me try to help, I've made many dumplings: There are four types of potato dumplings. They are called Klöße in northern Germany and Knödel in the south, both words mean the same. -Rohe Klöße (Raw Dumplings). These are made from raw grated potatoes. They are the most difficult to make. The surface is shiny and a bit slimy and you have pieces ...


11

Spätzle originates from a region spanning Austria, Switzerland and southern Germany. I can tell you that here in southern Germany, Spätzle is definitely considered a sort of pasta. You can buy premade, prepackaged dried Spätzle, and it is always on the pasta shelf. So I'd say it is correct to refer to it as pasta, at least for historical/traditional reasons, ...


7

Spaetzle is basically a noodle. Throw together egg, flour and salt (maybe some water to thin it out) and force it through a mold. Anything with holes can be used as a mold (for instance, I've used my old metal colander and that would work fine). Once the dough is formed into little pieces (it doesn't usually hold together for long threads), put it in boiling ...


6

I would say Spätzle is closer to pasta than a dumpling - it's a dough similar to pasta (eggs, flour, water, salt). For me, the main difference between pasta and dumplings is that pasta is cooked in water and sauce is added later, while dumplings are often cooked and served in the broth which flavours them. The English language wikipedia page ...


6

The meat for rouladen is cut from the upper part of the hind legs of the cow, or Oberschale. You definitely don't pound rouladen; pounded meat tends to re-contract somewhat under heat, and this unacceptable in this case. I don't know how to cut it that way at home. In Germany, the butcher sells the meat pre-cut to the correct size. I guess that he "peels" ...


6

Get rid of the water. That's probably why you have had better luck with the prepared rosti. After shredding, salt the potatoes and wring the heck out of them using a clean towel. America's Test Kitchen has a fun little trick in their recipe for latkes. They wring the salted and shredded potatoes over a measuring cup. After a few minutes, the starch from the ...


5

Disclaimer: I have eaten them often (I live in Germany), but never made them myself. The versions with raw potatoes exist, but are uncommon. When you say Klöße in Germany, everybody assumes the cooked-potato variety. I checked the biggest German online recipe database, and the most popular recipe there uses starch, other popular recipes include flour. ...


5

Strudel isn't a single dish, it is a family of dishes. I think that the origin is actually from the Otoman empire, the Austrohungarians appropriated the dish when they shared a border (but don't have a source handy). It is still very popular on the Balkans. (Older fiction translations there don't say anything about "meat pies", they always talk of "meat ...


4

Short answer: There should be no egg in Kartoffelknödel. It's usually 50% raw and 50% cooked potatoes. Grate the raw potatoes. Squeeze out the juice with a dish towel. Let the juice sit. Then mix the potatoes together. Drain the excess water from the juice and add the starchy rest to your dough. Add some more starch and semolina (i imagine breadcrumbs might ...


4

My mother (from Vienna) used to make these. We called them "gummi" knoedeln. You've inspired me to try to make them again. I don't have exact quantities, but here's basically how she used to make them. She put the RAW potatoes through a juicer and collected the potato "meat" left behind in the juicer. To this she added egg, semolina, salt and sour ...


4

My Kartoffle Knoedel: I cook my russet potatoes with the peel. Make sure they are done but not overdone. As soon as they are done, they dried in a bowl. Or you can make baked potatoes. The secret to kartoffel knoedel is that the potato is as floury as possible. When they are cold I put them through the potato ricer, add pepper, salt and nutmeg, add ...


4

In order to get crispy-crunchy fried onions, you need to deep-fry them at a high temperature. Pan frying just won't get them crunchy, they'll just get softer and softer as they get browner and browner. I don't know where you are from, but we have a product in the US that is ubiquitous in late fall, particularly on the Thanksgiving table. Perhaps something ...


3

I grew up eating these and longing for more, they were a special 'treat' : My mother had special muslin sacks that she had made to help "drain" the raw potatoes that she had put through a meat grinder after they had been peeled washed and set on a tray to dry off . We would hang them to let the excess moisture weep out and then twist them to squeeze out ...


3

To get started, follow these steps: Cook the potatoes in their skins, and save the water they were boiled in. Peel while hot Use a ricer in a large enamel dish Sprinkle potato starch over the mix, but not much too (it is easy to get potato starch during the Passover season) The trick then is the "quill", a German wooden spoon that has a star shaped ...


3

The methods listed here are good for making it. A simple dough forced into boiling, salted water. My grandmother Tauscher would make it, then drain and toss with some fresh farmstead butter and chopped fresh parsley or sometimes dill. Heavenly.


3

The ingredients are pretty similar to Italian egg pasta: wheat flour, eggs, salt, and water. The amount of eggs used is more, though, so that the consistency is that of a fairly thick batter instead of a dough. This batter is typically pressed through a coarse strainer into boiling water. More details at wikipedia.


3

There isn't really a difference between them, or at least it is a very loose one, since dumplings can be regarded as a variety of pasta, such as tortellini. In Italian language, "pasta" commonly indicates just dried durum-wheat pasta or fresh egg pasta (such as spaghetti, maccheroni, etc.) while there isn't an exact translation for "dumpling"; stuffed pasta ...


3

I have finally found a solution to this issue, which, apparently, many complain about on the internet. I am specifically answering my question about frying, and this should go for both store-bought mixes and self-made ones. Based on my experience, however, I recommend store-bought. Solution: Do not form the rösti "pancake" (I shall call it röstitaler) ...


3

Yes, you can freeze them: I have done it before, and it works just fine. They key (in my experience, that is) is to freeze the balls quickly if uncooked, and put them into the boiling water still frozen when you actually do the cooking. I have also been freezing cooked potato balls, and that works just fine as well -> In that case, warm them up in hot, but ...


2

According to the Wikipedia article, the following is a likely story (or something similar to it, anyway) but may not be exactly right: The very beginning of this youtube video of Alton Brown's Good Eats explains it rather well: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZR_evWiDbY Essentially, it was created by a monk as a reward for children who did their daily ...


2

The ingredients of sauerkraut are very basic--its basically just cabbage and salt (the water is drawn out of the cabbage). Given this, you will produce the most nutritious kraut using high-quality cabbage and salt with natural minerals. A high quality sea salt will contain additional minerals that processed kosher and table salts lack (also, it is ...


2

Wegmans sells it as top round, already sliced and in vacuum sealed packages. Wegmans is a high end, regional grocery store in the eastern US. They carry products you can't find in regular stores. I buy 8-10 packs at a time and freeze, I'm ready to make rouladen at any time. price just went up to $7.99 a lb, but if you've ever had boogered up rouladen meat, ...


2

Milanesa cut works great! That's what I used tonight.


2

I watched my German neighbor make them and she ground raw potatoes, poured milk over the raw potatoes, and then squeezed all the starch and milk out. She added some cooked potatoes, eggs and breadcrumbs, boiled them and froze them. Then when she made a pork roast she put them in with the roast and cooked and browned them and they were THE BEST!!!!


2

My grandfather is from bavaria, he uses a recipe like Thuringia Klose. boil and mash 1/3 of the potatoes juice the other 2/3 (separating potato flour and starch) mix the potato flour and mash, adding some of the starch to bind Add some bread if you are making them bigger, as this allows the inside to cook fully.


2

I think your main problem may be the cooking. Once you have the consistency right (sticky and firmish) then if they fall apart it is because you are boiling them. Never ever use boiling water. Use water that is barely simmering. The water must hardly move as the dumplings are cooked. Alison Sauer (English and married to an Austro-Bavarian!)


2

My Oma and Opa came over from Germany after WWII and brought my mother and her siblings. My husband and I just sold our house and are living with my Oma until our new home is finished. So, I have been on a German food binge. My Opa passed away several years ago and my Oma doesn't cook for herself anymore so I have been trying to soak up all of the German ...


2

There is no standard spice mix for Doner Kebabs. This generally applies to any food in any part of the world. There can be a common mix, but as you have experienced, they can be quite specific to certain areas of the world A major factor for noting a common spice mix is the global food supply industry. What happens in general is that food retailers buy bulk ...


2

Penn State Extension recommends: Cover with a plate weighted down with jars filled with water or cover with a large food grade plastic bag filled with salt water (6 tablespoons salt per gallon of water.)



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