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6

When I've seen that step in cookie recipes, generally there's no way you can over-firm in the fridge; if you're doing all the steps on the same day, it'll take two hours to set, but if you're trying to prep the night before, you can break for the night at this step. Generally you'll have a wet, sticky, soft dough you can't cut into shapes, and after a trip ...


3

With the stipulation that you will need a cone form to roll the cookies on, I think the ideal cookie base for your application is the tuile. You would have to adjust the flavorings, probably. You can find many recipes by googling, such as this one from King Arthur Flour. Here is an example of ginger-molasses tuiles recipe. Tuiles are malleable when they ...


3

Using melted hard candy, you are at the mercy of the ingredients of the hard candy manufacturer. I like to make my own sugar glass. Here is my recipe for sugar glass: 1 C Water 1.75 C Sugar .5 C Corn Syrup - the clearer the better .25 t Cream of Tartar I always supplement it with cream of tartar and corn syrup. The cream of tartar stabilizes the ...


2

When cookie recipes ask to be refrigerated for a period of time or overnight, it is about more than simply the final temperature. You cannot, for example, chill the dough in an ice water bath (sealed in plastic, for example, to keep it from getting waterlogged) to get it to a lower temperature faster. The outcome is about time as well as about temperature. ...


2

The American English term 'molasses' translates to 'dark treacle' in British English. Dried molasses, at least that which I am familiar with, is sulphered blackstrap molasses (the darkest, most bitter variety) and typically used as animal feed or as a soil amendment. If you can't find dark treacle and your recipe calls for white sugar substitute golden ...


2

When I make glass windows for my ginger bread houses I just crush hard candies, put the sides of my house on a cookie sheet with a thin smear of oil where the cut out windows are. Then I put the crushed candy in the cut out windows of the sides and front of my house. I put it in the hot oven, watch it closely, and wait for it to melt. Then I have candy ...


2

I don't consider ExpertChef's answer directly applicable, but it shows an interesting experiment possibility. It could be that glueing a tough, flexible film to your sugar windows will absorb some physical tension or jolting effects, and/or prevent drying out which leads to cracking. (The second shouldn't be a problem with traditional hard candy, but we ...


2

I actually tried making ice cream cones a few days ago (I thought it might be fun to go with some home made sorbet). I was recently given The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz and so I used the recipe in his book. The cone recipe he gave was similar to a tuile (I guess ice cream cones really are just a conical tuile) using egg whites, sugar, plain flour and ...


1

Firm here means that it should not be supple, nor too hard to be easy to cut. It will be sustaining shape. If you have a round cylinder of cookie dough, cutting it should keep the cylinder in the same shape rather than flattening the sides where you are holding the dough and flattening the dough around the cut (dough too soft). 2 hours or overnight means at ...


1

Just went for it by following directions here: http://www.taste.com.au/good+taste/article/good+times/make+a+gingerbread+house,635 I will say that "Set aside for 3-5 minutes. The chocolate sets quickly" was very optimistic. Needed to balance roof on supports til chocolate was hard -an hour! Yes, it cooled quickly but did not become hard til then. Used 50% ...



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