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17

Go around the edges, tapping the rim with the handle of a butter knife (leaving little dents). That should allow you to twist it off.


14

Where do you live? European Pyrex is made from borosilicate glass, the same as in laboratory's equipment; American Pyrex is made from common soda-lime glass. If you are in America, don't bother trying it at all; soda-lime glass is sensitive to thermal shock. Even though it's tempered for kitchenware, it is nowhere near good enough for the burner. In ...


10

It looks a champagne coupe, like this. Did you ever see pyramids of glasses where a butler fills the top one and let the champagne flow? I think that's the type of glass used, like this.


9

From the PyrexLove FAQ: Is it all right to use my vintage Pyrex directly on the stove? We’d like to just nip this one in the bud and say - NO. Some pieces actually say “Not for stovetop”, but we never put vintage pyrex bowls, casseroles or whatever directly on the stove, ever. You can try it, but we’d rather not risk it. But we do get a ...


8

As baka has said, more volatile components of the wine will be released with more wine surface exposed. Also, this not only releases aroma but also helps the wine to "breathe" and oxidize, which is why you open the red wine bottle half an hour before serving it (so that this process starts), and why you might pour the wine into a decanter. This process ...


8

Filling the lower jug with water and then putting the whole thing in the freezer worked. I checked it after a couple of hours and didn't think it had worked as I still couldn't separate them, but it mustn't have finished freezing at that point because when I looked again a bit later the ice had travelled up between the two jugs and then at some point the ...


7

Just tried it - answer is no. Wish i'd read this before it cracked because of the heat.


7

How, and if, you clean your tea pot depends both on what your tea pot is made out of, and your personal preference. The only time I've ever seen it recommended that you avoid cleaning agents entirely when cleaning a tea pot is if it is made out of clay. The reason for using only water is because unfinished clay pots, like Yixing / zisha pots, have very ...


6

I wouldn't pay much attention to this list. I would just get my cookware based on what functionality I need, not based on what my stove manufacturer says. The idea of not using cast iron on glass to protect the glass from scratches is as perverse as keeping a sunhat in the closet and going to the beach bareheaded to protect the sunhat from color fading. ...


6

In future, if you're using a jar that you'll be emptying (like pasta sauce), the quickest way to open them is take a sharp, sturdy, pointed knife (or even a screwdriver), brace the jar well in a cloth, then carefully make a hole in the top of the lid (just place the point on it and give it a tap or two on the end of the handle). This breaks the seal of the ...


6

Ok - finally got it open! While googling, I came across a suggestion to cover the lid with a plastic glove and use that for traction. Not sure if it was the combination of running under hot water + the glove, or if the glove would've worked on it's own, but it's open now :)


6

Yes, but not the time so much. The dish itself is not a good conductor of heat, like cast iron or other metal for example. And it allows radiant heat directly on what is being cooked. One thing I do is that I have a pizza stone in my oven that helps keep the oven temperature stable. Another thing that is very common is that oven temperatures are ...


5

One thing that has worked for me is to slide a flat (butter) knife along the glass under the edge of the lid. Turn slightly to break the seal. Warning -- if your knife isn't strong, it will twist the blade. You'll know if you got it, since you'll be able to hear the seal breaking


5

Sometimes. Basically, this is the same as asking if glass is oven safe: Generally, glass is oven-safe if taken from room temperature and put in a moderate-temperature, preheated oven. The key thing is to avoid temperature shocks (which will cause the glass to shatter). Some glass is specifically designed for oven use (either by being tempered or made of ...


5

Yes, they work. The reason they work for keeping liquid warm is because the air pocket slows down the transfer of heat from the liquid to the glass to your hand. Air has a lower thermal conductivity than glass does, which means that it slows down the loss of heat from your drink. (The thermal conductivity of air is 0.024 W/m/°C, while the thermal ...


5

Note: I am assuming this glass is kitchenware, like mixing bowls or measuring cups, not service ware like drinking glasses or teacups. Glass melts at about 1500 F / 800 C. There is no danger of melting the glass in any type of steamer, or realistically with any equipment you may have at home. The real issue is thermal shock: very rapidly cooling glass ...


4

No. Tried it today melting some butter on a low heat and it exploded violently sending glass shards in a 1 metre radius. Suprised me as I remembered using Pyrex test tubes over a Bunsen burner in science class. Won't be trying that again. Epic fail!


4

I think it may be just a matter of scale but your pic makes me think of a margarita glass. Of course there are many styles of margarita glasses that look similar (but not quite the same...)


4

If your jars aren't in the refrigerator already, I highly recommend unscrewing the lids as soon as possible...unless you want to be able to share stories about how you found glass shards and the smell of kimchi everywhere in your kitchen one day. Depending on when you mean to eat them, I'd recommend a mix of room temperature ripening and fridge storage. ...


3

I use a double walled stainless steel mug. It works very well and keeps 500 mls of water hot for more than an hour, and yet still handles like a normal mug. The walls are separated by air, there is no vacuum I would expect there to be more thermal losses with glass, but I would still imagine it to perform well. I have noticed over recent years the ...


3

Since I don't know this product, I can only answer with (my) common sense: Air should be a much better insulator than glass, so even if there's no (good) vacuum, the insulation should work pretty well. One thing to keep in mind is what is mentioned on the Wikipedia article on vacuum flasks Heat transfer by thermal radiation may be minimized by ...


3

I have personally successfully broken a Pyrex dish through heat shock so I'd answer this question with a, "be careful," or, "probably best not to." In my case I was making marzipan for my Christmas cake. I used the dish on top of a second steel pot containing water to warm the egg on the gas stove. Then transfered from that hot location to a bath of cold ...


3

My favorite jar opener: The Brix JarKey You just need a gentle lift to let a little air in and then you can remove the top bare-handed. The lid is not damaged (unless you use more force than necessary). In a pinch, you can use channel-lock pliers to do the same thing. Hold the pliers "upside-down" so the longer jaw is under the edge of the jar lid and ...


3

All cook top safety is the same: Keep it clean and pay attention! Glass ranges aren't inherently any more unsafe than a gas or normal electric range. Ranges are just a tool, one that generates a large amount of heat in a small area. Like any tool, you can hurt yourself or others if you don't follow the basic rules of use. Luckily, those rules are pretty ...


3

Update based on edited question: there are no issues of toxicity. It is a very poor idea to use glass cookware on a burner. Not all Pyrex is made from high quality borosilicate glass anymore, and even if you have some, the issue is thermal shock, not toxicity. If you heat or cool glass very rapidly, the internal stress caused by thermal expansion (or ...


2

You need to depressurize it. It is very easy to do to simply take the pointed edge of a fork and jab the top of the container (the tin lid). Any small puncture made will work, once done the lid will open normally without any strenuous force. This method will work in the case where traction cannot force the lid open.


2

Other suggestions would be: Turning the jar upside down, and using the palm of your hand to thwak the bottom a few times. Using a rubber band instead of a rubber glove, if you don't have one available.


2

Fill top jug with ice cubes. Fill bottom jug with hot (not boiling) water. Let sit for a few minutes. Take a rubber mallett and gently tap the lower section of the handle of the top jug. I had previously squeezed a little dishwashing soap around the rim of the lower jug, and maybe that helped to release it also. Works!


2

My guess is that it has to do with typical serving temperature. Red wines are generally served at warmer temperatures, so they need less concentration at the nose, because the aromatic compounds are more volatile at warmer temperatures. Basically, "more" smell is coming out of a warmer liquid than a colder one, so to get the full experience, you can get ...


2

Its a Coupe, or to use it's original full name: a Champage Coupe. As you seem to be suggesting, you want glasses of this kind for drinking cocktails out of, rather than Champagne. And you're not alone. Coupe's were the traditional choice for drinking Champagne, reaching a peak of popularity in the early 20th century. However they aren't really ideal for ...



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