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22

I went into some detail with this in my answer to What are the factors that affect the chewiness, softness, moisture of bread based desserts like cinnamon rolls? To summarize my points there and add some more (simplified) detail on the chemistry: Gluten is responsible for elasticity of dough, which is perceived as chewiness. The difference between bread, ...


16

i am celiac, ideally you should clean your entire kitchen, clean out your silverware and utensil drawers and wash all utensils in the dishwasher. Wipe all surfaces and sinks with bleach wipes. Scrub all pots and pans, to remove gluten films then wash in dishwasher. give all dishes to be used a run through the dishwasher. off limit items are, seasoned pans ...


11

For most celiacs, it is any trace of gluten. That means that you don't want something to touch gluten and then touch the food a celiac will eat (example: a butter knife used on toast and then double dipped back into the butter will contaminate the butter). My gluten-free friends have suggested that they are better judges of ingredients, as well, as gluten ...


10

You have several options for the crust. It is possible to purchase mixes that will get you started. There are also several recipes available. A good resource for all your gluten-free baking is Gluten-Free Girl and the Chef, and you can find a recipe there. Another great option is former pastry chef Helene at Tartlette. This question has compiled a list ...


7

This depends of course on what you are using for gluten-free flour, but according to Khymos' Data (PDF warning) and corroborated by my own experience, 1.5% is about the maximum concentration of xanthan you would ever use, beyond which food starts to get really slimy. The recommended amount for flour is going to depend on exactly what kind of "gluten free ...


7

Golden syrup is indeed gluten free, as neither sugar cane or beet contains gluten. In fact, beet fibre is used in many gluten-free products. See the Tate & Lyle site for more information: http://www.lylesgoldensyrup.com/healthandnutrition.php


7

There are a number of rice-based bread crumb replacements, but my experience with them is that they are more like rice sand than bread crumbs. You can try making you own from other gluten free products like waffles or maybe puffed rice cereal.


6

This is a very subjective question. For example: I find the recipes on Gluten-Free Goddess to use excessive Xanthan Gum (bouncy balls do not make good cupcakes). That being said I highly suggest you start with the basics and make your own flour to learn the balance of how different flours effect the texture and flavor of baked goods. A few good books with ...


6

It's the water in your skin more so than anything else that makes it stick to your hands; generally the most effective way to prevent any kind of water-based dough or batter from sticking to your hands is by greasing them. Some of the fat might get into the dough, but not really enough to make a difference. Any kind of fat will do. Vegetable oil is the ...


6

I'm guessing that you should be able to simply add it wherever you would add some sort of grain or flour. The wikipedia article mentions: Other uses include gluten-free baking, where ground psyllium seed husks bind moisture and help make the bread less crumbly. If you add some to your Nutraloaf, if it's enough to have an effect, it'll help it bind ...


6

If there's leavening in the cake (baking soda or baking powder) that gets activated once incorporated with the rest of the ingredients, and you substantially overmix, you may lose some of its power as you help the gas escape from your batter. Unless you're whipping it vigorously, you're not going to be bringing enough air into the batter to make up for it. ...


5

I would go out an buy some. Dough textures for gluten-free breads are fragile and the result of extensive testing with various non-wheat flours (at least, good ones like Serious Eats are). None of the other flours you have available will have the same water absorbsion or starch content which rice flour does. If you substitute, you'd have to make the ...


5

Note that wheat is a type of grass, and is technically a grain. Grains without gluten Not all grains have gluten—only those closely related to wheat do. Grains which do not have gluten include: Corn (maize) and its variants or derivatives such as cornmeal, polenta, hominy, or masa Rice (all varieties) A note on rice: some varieties are called ...


4

I hate to say it, but I'd be willing to bet that gluten-free udon is about as practical as gluten-free seitan - the gluten is precisely what gives udon noodles the texture that makes them so special. Having said that, I've bought frozen udon noodles that had tapioca starch as an ingredient in addition to wheat flour, and those were some of the best udon ...


4

I'm a coeliac from Australia and so my tips come from my experience here, but they should hopefully be useful regardless. The first thing I suggest is joining your local society which can be invaluable in terms of support, information and even training. The training covers for example how to read ingredient lists to determine whether something is gluten ...


4

It depends on what you mean by gluten-free flour. If you are buying a gluten-free flour mix that it labeled for all-purpose use then you should be able to substitute that and get a reasonably good result. Substituting straight rice or almond flour in a standard recipe will not work well, because the mixes have a blend of ingredients designed to make it ...


4

In an answer to another question, someone else was looking for answers on dealing with thickening dairy. If you want to address thickening with corn starch, here are some beginning steps; Use the right ratio of corn starch slurry to liquid: 1 tablespoon corn starch thickens 1 cup of liquid Use the corn starch in a slurry: although you didn't mention clumps ...


4

I imagine you have tried recipes already with an appropriate quantity of xanthum gum and starches... are you making any substitutions, or omitting ingredients? Substitutions really change the game significantly, even unwitting substitutions like sweet rice flour vs white rice flour, potato flour vs potato starch. Substituting an alternative flour directly ...


4

I have no trouble making lovely light lemon cake gluten free, and many other gluten free cakes too, I make them for a living. There is a substitute for gluten and it's called Xanthan Gum. You can buy this separately to add to your flour (about a teaspoonful for every 250g), or in a ready mixed flour blend, at least you can in the UK. A mixture of flours ...


3

It seems like a lot of recipes recomend gelatin, which could add to the stretchyness. I frequent serious eats and a while ago they posted this recipe and they claim that it is great and stretchy. http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/04/gluten-free-tuesday-easy-pizza-crust-recipe.html


3

This may not be a great answer, but Bob's Red Mill makes a great all-purpose, gluten-free flour that is 1:1. They also provide suggestions of the amount of xanthan gum to use, depending on the application (muffins, bread, pie crust, etc). Since cake flour has less gluten than all purpose, and bread flour has the most gluten...you can vary the amount of ...


3

Oh, have I got the answer for you. Xanthan gum. Here is an excellent article by two of my favorite bloggers on how to get started using it. Xanthan gum is easy to find at health food stores because gluten-free bakers use it extensively.


3

You need something to make the batter a little more sticky so that bubbles from yeast or baking soda stay trapped as the bread bakes. I generally use a little bit of xantham gum and a couple of tablespoons of arrowroot flour. To make sure they're fully hydrated (for optimal sliminess) let the wet batter sit for a couple of minutes before adding baking ...


3

A handful of resources my wife (who is gluten-intolerant) suggested: Gluten-Free Girl Gluten Free Gobsmacked Books by Bette Hagman One concern my wife mentioned (especially for others who come across this question who may not be aware) about non-gluten-free people preparing food for gluten-free people is the awareness of cross-contamination. If your ...


3

Apart from the official recommendations (20 PPM), this is also individual. You should hear with your guest what applies for this person. Some needs a very strict clean environment, while others tolerate some minor contamination. Clean cooking Normally, you don't need to remove everything with gluten from your kitchen, as long as you keep products with ...


3

I'm not the best cook to be answering these type of questions, but I have come up with a "breadcrumb" substitute that my family is quite happy with. I take the frozen udi"s sandwich bread and toast it, then crumble. I guess any prepared bread with brown rice flour would give the same result!


3

Gram flour (Chickpea/Garbanzo/Besan) contains no gluten, and can easily be cooked into light, fluffy pancakes/tortillas. Let the cakes dry, crumble them, and you have perfectly serviceable, gluten free, crumbs. Indian markets usually carry bags of besan for a reasonable price.


3

You are asking not just to substitute for butter, but to reduce the total amount of fat in cookies. All of the most common butter substitutes are going to be oils, margarine or other fats since they will perform similarly in the chemistry of the cookie. This makes it difficult to offer a simple substitution. Instead, I recommend taking the approach of ...


3

Dextrose is another name for the sugar glucose. In the US most powdered dextrose and/or glucose syrups are produced from corn starch, in the UK and other European countries they may be made from wheat or other starchy plant sources. According to a 2008 study from Finland, even though wheat based glucose syrup was found to contain low amounts of residual ...


3

Pamela's at http://www.pamelasproducts.com/products/baking-mixes/ makes a great non-gluten crust. I even added more coconut flour to it and mixed it in the food processor for a sweet potato pie. It came out firm and tasty. Also baked it first then added the filling and baked it again. If you add more flour you might want to add a little more salt but I like ...



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