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I just called C&H Sugar (1 800 773 1803) to see if their confection/powdered sugar is gluten free and they said it has less than 0.01% of corn gluten in it.


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Yes, use with or in place of flour as thickening agent, but no more than 2-3 tbsp. Basically, 1 tbsp is equal to 1/4 cup flour in terms of thickening sauces on stove. You may also use as a binding agent as in meat loaf. Again, don't add gobs of it. A tablespoon or two is plenty. If you add too much you'll end up with library paste and a possible bowel ...


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You can also use xanthan gum in soups as a thickener (but not 1:1 in substitution of flour). We use that in our keto diet. Bob's Mill simple desciption Wikipedia Personally I would not use a whole 1/4 cup of flour to thicken a soup. I would use heavy cream and/or blend a portion of the soup.


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My step daughter also has celiacs/coeliacs disease. We often use all-purpose gluten free flour for soups, cheese sauce and roux etc. I can honestly say there is no noticeable difference. The only thing I would recommend is if the recipe asks you to make a roux don't try and cook out the flour as it will turn lumpy. Instead just melt the butter, add the flour ...


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For recipes where you don't want to use apples or bananas, I suggest plain yogurt. After baking it is essentially tasteless in cookies or brownies. It will add a slight taste to bread, making it taste a bit like sourdough. Best of all, yogurt serves most of the purposes that eggs do: it adds moisture, acts as a binder, and makes the dough/batter less acidic. ...


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Easiest thing to do: Google "Egg Free Gluten Free" and pick something. There's a lot. When substituting eggs for moisture another good substitute is mashed banana. It works similarly to the applesauce. Rice flour is my favorite glutren-free flour replacement because it's easy to get and cheap from any Asian market/Asian aisle at any big boxed store. Just ...


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It depends on what you're trying to bake. For cookies and brownies, I've had good luck using ground flax seed plus water. This won't work for items where you need to whip egg whites separately. As for the gluten, there are plenty of 'gluten free flour replacements' available commercially, but some are better than others for specific items (breads vs. ...


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AFAIK, (which isn't much) there is no one good substitute for eggs in baking. This is because the egg can be there for one or more of several reasons. This includes as a flavorant, emulsifier, moisturizer and leavener. So, I'll address each of these separately. Flavor - I have yet to find an ingredient or ester I can easily produce to replicate the very ...



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