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17

If the exterior of the gnocchi you had at the restaurant was crispy in the sense that it had a crunch to it, then they probably dropped it in a deep fryer for a minute or so to crisp it up. I usually saute mine in clarified butter to brown the exterior and form a crust but it's not necessarily "crispy". Regardless of what you're frying and whether you're ...


11

The primary difference between a dumpling and a noodle, besides shape, is leavening. Dumplings usually have either egg or baking powder to make them lighter. There's considerable bleedover in terminology here. It's reminiscent of the difficulty of defining "chowder". You're always finding a counterexample. I wouldn't be surprised if someone came up with ...


8

You're on the right track! Start adding your flour in the bowl as you did and when you can remove it without it being too tacky then start working it on a cutting board or countertop as you continue adding more flour. Sounds like maybe you pulled it out of the bowl too soon. As for a specific ratio of flour to potatoes/veg. that's going to depend not only ...


8

This post has been out there for a while - but I found that first parboiling the potatoes (about 10 minutes); then baking them, skins ON in a low-medium temperature oven, until cooked; then cooling slightly and scooping out the flesh; made for much fluffier and generally lighter gnocchi. Of course, you still need to mash the flesh well, but having it ...


7

Surprisingly, the answer seems to be a qualified yes, however the texture is not the same. The dried gnocchi turned out to be much better if fried after boiling; see below. Here are the results of my experiment: I dried a small amount of the fresh Gnocchi by placing them in a 150 degree (Farenheit) oven for about an hour, then turning off the oven and ...


7

Probably the most important considerations is using the correct variety of potato. You need to use a variety that's good for mashing such as Maris Piper or King Edward (uk) or Idaho and russet (US) It's also very important to make sure you mash the potatoes well. If you can't get a smooth texture by hand mashing, use a mouli or even a food processor. For ...


6

I typically use potato, flour and egg. Make. Freeze. Then, go directly from freezer to boiling water. Do not defrost first.


5

To me the key is to work in as little flour as possible. And that means that the potato should be as dry as possible. That is why I say just bake the potato with the skins wrapped in tinfoil with some water and a little salt (you aren't tightly wrapping each potato, but rather wrapping 2-3 of them together loosely). Also mash then with a ricer, you ...


5

Yes, gnocchi store well in the fridge for a day or so, or in the freezer for longer term storage. It's best to try and keep the gnocchi separate (placing on a baking sheet or tray is best) so they don't stick together, and very well covered so that they don't absorb any odours in your fridge. If freezing, freeze on the tray until reasonably hard, and you ...


3

I think gnocchi should work best with varieties of potatoes that you think of as mealy, dry, and fluffy when cooked. The most common mealy potato is russet. From On Food and Cooking: Mealy types (russets, blue and purple varieties, Russian and banana fingerlings) concentrate more dry starch in their cells, so they're denser than waxy types. When cooked, ...


3

I'm going to propose a different cooking method that's closer to cooking it on the stovetop; gnocchi when cooked wrong can be quite dense. It's still edible, but it's not as enjoyable. take your cooking vessel, and heat up your cooking liquid (I'd go with just water, as we don't know how much liquid it's going to absorb, and we don't want too runny of a ...


3

I scatter them on a metal tray thinly coated with flour. Once the tray is full, it goes directly into the freezer. After the gnocchi are frozen on the tray, I dump them into a freezer bag. If you pile them to deep in the freezer before they are frozen (ie in a bag or box) they stick together. Out of the freezer, directly into boiling water. Do not need to ...


3

I think the fact that I've never seen dried potato gnocchi, only vacuum packed 'fresh' potato gnocchi means that you can't. If you could surely dried potato gnocchi would be in the shops. It seems that the dried gnocchi is semolina gnocchi, and not potato although there seems to be a patent for a technique for drying potato gnocchi. If you try it let us ...


3

The amount of flour to add depends on how much water is in the potatoes after cooking. If you add too much flour, the texture will suffer. If you add too little flour, the gnocchi will disintegrate in the water. The best thing to do is add flour a little bit at a time, and boil one test gnocchi after each addition until you reach the desired texture. ...


2

Noodles are thin and elongated. Dumplings are not. Both are unleavened dough cooked (frequently) in boiling water, but generally the distinction tends to fall along shape-based lines.


2

If your potatoes are prepared correctly before adding the other ingredients, then excess water should not be a problem. After boiling your potatoes until tender and draining them, I recommend placing them on a sheet pan and drying them in a 300° F oven for 5 minutes or so before passing them through your food mill or potato ricer. With properly prepared ...


2

The dough should keep for around a week in the fridge before changing texture, in my experience. So a day should be fine.


1

Put the gnocci in the tomato sauce with a little extra water to compensate for the absorption from the gnocci, and then microwave until done to your liking. You may need to add water as it cooks, if they are very absorbent. The cooking time is likely to be longer, maybe even a lot longer, than boiling. You will also want to stir every couple of minutes ...


1

The only answer that makes any sense (other than the "just for show" hypothesis) is that baking in salt does create a fluffier potato. That assertion is backed up by Cook's Illustrated and the Idaho Potato Commission [citation]. So, for the lightest possible gnocchi, start with the fluffiest possible potato. I've got to say though, roasting potatoes in salt ...


1

The less moisture the better so use floury potatoes like King Edwards or Golden Wonder and bake them rather than boil them.


1

Perhaps because gnocchi is cooked in the same way to a dumpling, by boiling in something like hot water/stock or steamed.


1

Possibly because they aren't normally dried out. It's probably just 'one of those things' - I don't think there is an ISO committee of food naming


1

I use a regular dehydrator after cooking at 40 degrees Celsius for 7 hrs. I store them dry in a masonry jar. This works fine and doesn't change anything. I also don't use eggs.


1

You can also use a microwave to bake your potatoes by a "dry" method. I'm partial to semolina flour.



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