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16

My technique: 1 tbsp Fat (from pan, or use butter) 1 tbsp Flour Pan Juice Stock (total liquid about 2 cups - omit if you have enough pan juice) Step 1: Make Roux Melt fat in medium high saute pan Whisk in flour, getting out all the lumps. (This is called a roux) Continue to heat until smooth, and the roux is just starting to darken. Remove pan ...


12

Gravy is supposed to be opaque and is a result of using flour as the thickener. If you want clear gravy, like what you would get in a Chinese restaurant, then you need to use corn starch or arrowroot as your thickener. But the opacity is considered to be a good thing. It's the canned stuff you buy in the store that is clear.


11

As @Eric Hu notes, a dark roux is the way to go. It's interesting that he mentions Alton Brown, as it's his turkey gravy recipe I use. His recipe also uses red wine, which further darkens the gravy, richens it, and adds a fantastic flavor. I'd only change one thing: next time I'm going to make the roux and finish the gravy in a separate pan after deglazing. ...


10

I believe that I have made some of those conflicting comments. It is definitely possible to make an excellent pan gravy with the drippings from a brined turkey. It is also really easy to have the gravy turn out inedibly salty if you aren't careful. Make sure you follow the brining recipe. Don't have too high a concentration of salt and don't brine for too ...


7

Based on my experience with dried and fresh shiitake mushrooms, and the guidance from Gaku Homma in his book Japanese Country Cooking, I'd say that you will simply get different results with fresh shiitake. There's actually a fair amount of flavor concentration that happens as a side effect of dehydrating mushrooms, and this is particularly pronounced with ...


7

Some ideas: Use a brown chicken/turkey stock. Classic poultry stock uses raw bones, but you can make a rich, brown stock using roasted bones. Be aware that it won't be as gelatinous as it would be with raw bones, so if you can, add some necks, backs, and if you can find them, feet. Add some tawny port, Madeira, or dry Marsala. In terms of technique: ...


6

Add a roux, ideally a dark roux, to your gravy. This is a standard French and Cajun (which is French-rooted) technique for giving color and body to sauces. Roux's are essentially butter or oil and flour, heated gently and stirred occasionally to cook the flour so that it darkens in color, but doesn't burn. The darker the roux, the less thickening ...


6

It sounds like you are trying to maximize the amount of pan juices, sometimes referred to be the French word jus. Any piece of meat is only going to express so much jus; if you have potatoes or other absorbent vegetables in the roasting pan, they are going to absorb it and it won't be available for another purpose such as gravy. What you still will almost ...


5

In their various parts of the world, all of these words mean sauce, at least some of the time. They come from different cultures, though, and carry different connotations at least in US usage. Short answer, though: there are no absolute differences that you can count on. Salsa This is a generic term in Spanish, and in South American cuisines. It can ...


5

I've never had any problem using the drippings from a brined turkey for gravy, and I've probably done 10 of them. If you're particularly concerned about it, use the neck and giblets to make a plain stock and cook that down a fair amount to concentrate the flavor. You can use that for the gravy instead of the drippings and no worries about salt. Or you can ...


4

I make sure that there are plenty of onions under the meat when roasting, but be careful not to let them burn. If you are not that keen on onion gravy just leave them out. Once the meat is done, pour off most of the oil from the cooking juices to avoid an oily gravy. Place the cooking travy on the hob over a medium / high heat. If you need to deglaze the ...


4

Instant gravy packets are not known for their subtle flavor. They contain boullion, tons of salt, and some modified starch. If you don't like the flavor of a lot of that gravy then don't use it. The scrambled egg recipe that you linked to is of a particular variety. They are just barely set. This gives them a very delicate flavor and even more delicate ...


4

I grilled my turkey this year, here is how I made the gravy: Cut the wing tips off Make a mirepoix (chopped carrots, celery and onions) Brown the mirepoix really well. Brown the neck, wing tips and giblets (but not the liver-fry that separately and eat it for a snack) Simmer the mirepoix and browned meat bits in a few cups of water for an hour or more to ...


4

The solution is very simple. Fry steak Saute onions Remove from stove, wait a minute or two Melt butter, add flour Season with heat insensitive stuff (e.g. salt) Add stock Return to stove Let simmer for a couple of minutes Season with heat sensitive stuff (e.g. fresh tarragon) Assuming that you are frying your steak below the carb charring temp ...


3

If you want more gravy you need to add more liquids and natural flavours. Better if you have bone but . . . no bone: Before you roast your beef sear it, so it has good colour when it comes out, deglaze the pan/baking tray with water/red wine/white wine or Madeira one of me faves and put that to one side. (in the gravy stock pot) Add onions, carrots and ...


3

You've got this all mixed up! Unless you're deglazing to do a pan sauce, the steak should be the LAST thing cooked. It's the centerpiece of the dish and the most expensive part, and shouldn't have a chance to get cold while you cook the other parts. Saving cleaning on a single saucepan is not worth eating cold steak. You MUST use a stainless or cast-iron ...


3

A hot pan will help you generate the fond while cooking your steak. The onions likely require something less that a scorching surface to grill. You might try letting your pan cool for even a minute before attempting your roux or possibly use a bit of olive oil ahead of the butter which will greatly reduce its propensity to burn. Even better use all olive oil ...


2

Just to add a little to this discussion. There should never be that much starch left over in your water to really thicken a tomato sauce. I will have to back @ElendilTheTall here. All the thickening power of the starch should already be completely used up in that cooking water, and the cooking water should be thinner than your tomato sauce so the net ...


2

I haven't seen the method in question, but assuming you're cooking the turkey with indirect heat all you're really doing is roasting it on the grill. Given that, there's no reason you can't put your bird in a pan to catch the drippings the same way you would in an oven, provided it all fits in the grill, of course.


2

Here is a great place to go to compare identified inards with what you have. http://www.eatmedaily.com/2009/11/offal-of-the-week-turkey-offal/ Personally, when making gravy, I just use the drippings from the turkey, sometimes I throw the neck in for a little extra, if I need to make some more. Call me squimish, but I usually toss the rest, but that's ...


2

It's probably less to do with the amount of juices that came out of the rib roast and more to do with the extended caramelisation of those juices produced by overcooking. Those burnt, caramelised bits left in the bottom of the pan are full of flavour and it's probably that, that added so much more flavour to your gravy than you're used to. Just replicate it ...


1

Have you ever heard of "rice and gravy"? It's ubiquitous in Cajun country. That's essentially what you made. To repeat it, all you have to do it brown your meat really well and then deglaze the pan repeatedly throughout the cooking process. It should be a covered braise and you can make it with anything from a roast to meatloaf. You can do it with most ...


1

Some people "brown" flour in a frying pan prior to making gravy. Equal amounts (1 - 3 tbsp - more for a thicker gravy) of butter or oil and flour. Lightly brown in pot. I have also browned with no butter. Our favorite way to darken gravy is to add small amounts of light Japanese soy sauce.


1

In addition to the suggestions of using a dark roux--and remember, the darker the roux, the more dark roux flavor, and the more color, but the less thickening you get from the roux--you might want to make your own dark turkey stock. I like to roast my turkey cut up, so it is no problem to make the stock from the back, neck, giblets (except the liver), the ...


1

In general I would not reuse steaming water to make gravy. As devin_s said you are unlikely to get much flavor from there. Depending on what you're steaming (e.g. spinach), however, you are likely to pick up some bitterness or other off flavors. Water used for boiling, on the other hand, can be very useful. For example, if you have boiled shrimp with ...


1

It shouldn't matter if you re-use the water you used for steaming or use fresh water. I would only use it in a few situations: You want to season the gravy with whatever flavors ended up in the water You want some of the starch in the water to help thicken the gravy You want to be frugal and reuse the water and not pour it down the sink The benefits of ...


1

I am ethnically Italian. Whenever my grandmother would make pasta she would keep the water that was leftover. Within a day or two she would combine the water with Parmigiano rinds, whole onions (skin and all), celery ends and carrot knobs (all cooked very slowly) to make the broth she would use for vegetable soup, pasta sauce and the liquid to raise the ...


1

I think you should read McGee on this one. Basically he says the 'water' from boiling pasta is very rich in flavor. Italian recipes often suggest adding pasta water to adjust the consistency of a sauce, but this thick water is almost a sauce in itself. When I anointed a batch of spaghetti with olive oil and then tossed it with a couple of ladles-full, ...


1

The flavor I think is why you usually don't see many other stocks. Beef makes excellent general use stock, but fatty meat such as lamb, pork and oily poultry like duck and goose have too distinctive a flavour. Quote pulled from here I can attest to the lamb stock. I made a sauce from a lamb leg bone and the flavor was dominated by strong lamb taste.


1

use them all. i make one gravy (often a jar-name brand is usually best) without the good stuff, and one, again using a jar, with the neck boiled for hours the rest fried and simmered for the last hour of turkey cooking, minus what i eat. to answer the question, the 2 soft dark red parts are most likely the liver. if they feel muscularly or hard, it is the ...



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