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17

Another thickener that is readily available is gelatin. This has the added advantage that its free of carbohydrate (if you are avoiding that).


16

My technique: 1 tbsp Fat (from pan, or use butter) 1 tbsp Flour Pan Juice Stock (total liquid about 2 cups - omit if you have enough pan juice) Step 1: Make Roux Melt fat in medium high saute pan Whisk in flour, getting out all the lumps. (This is called a roux) Continue to heat until smooth, and the roux is just starting to darken. Remove pan ...


15

Consider the use of gums, which are essentially thickening agents. Xanthan gum, a bacterial byproduct, can be used to thicken sauces. Here is an example of using xanthan + [pectin] (a plant sugar gelling agent) to thicken a vegan demi-glace. A traditional demi-glace has gelatin from the breakdown of collagen (from animal bones), which is how it achieves a ...


14

Tapioca Starch - Add at the very end of cooking, it works quickly and has a pretty neutral flavour. You don't it to spend much/any time over heat. If you can't find it in your typical grocery store, you should be able to find in a typical Asian grocery store/aisle. I use this often when I have Celiac friends over. Arrrowroot powder - More stable than other ...


12

As @Eric Hu notes, a dark roux is the way to go. It's interesting that he mentions Alton Brown, as it's his turkey gravy recipe I use. His recipe also uses red wine, which further darkens the gravy, richens it, and adds a fantastic flavor. I'd only change one thing: next time I'm going to make the roux and finish the gravy in a separate pan after deglazing. ...


12

Gravy is supposed to be opaque and is a result of using flour as the thickener. If you want clear gravy, like what you would get in a Chinese restaurant, then you need to use corn starch or arrowroot as your thickener. But the opacity is considered to be a good thing. It's the canned stuff you buy in the store that is clear.


11

I believe that I have made some of those conflicting comments. It is definitely possible to make an excellent pan gravy with the drippings from a brined turkey. It is also really easy to have the gravy turn out inedibly salty if you aren't careful. Make sure you follow the brining recipe. Don't have too high a concentration of salt and don't brine for too ...


11

Hello @Phrancis and welcome to Seasoned Advice! Poutine gravy is a beef gravy made with beef or veal stock. Here is a link to a recipe . There are many other recipes online, as well. You can buy the prepared sauce online here or a gravy mix on Amazon . By the way, you were on the right track, just not quite there yet! :)


8

Some ideas: Use a brown chicken/turkey stock. Classic poultry stock uses raw bones, but you can make a rich, brown stock using roasted bones. Be aware that it won't be as gelatinous as it would be with raw bones, so if you can, add some necks, backs, and if you can find them, feet. Add some tawny port, Madeira, or dry Marsala. In terms of technique: ...


8

A gravy tastes like gravy because it has salt and glutamates, which is what yeast extract has been formulated to deliver. There is no vegan replacement. The only good way to produce glutamates in your kitchen is to sear meat. You can certainly make a veloute sauce instead of a gravy. It is made from stock and roux. Roux is a combination of fat and starch - ...


7

Based on my experience with dried and fresh shiitake mushrooms, and the guidance from Gaku Homma in his book Japanese Country Cooking, I'd say that you will simply get different results with fresh shiitake. There's actually a fair amount of flavor concentration that happens as a side effect of dehydrating mushrooms, and this is particularly pronounced with ...


7

You can use cooked dry beans. I use baby Lima's, canned or freshly cooked. Do not rinse away the starch after you cook them. Cream them in a blender or food processor, place them in a skillet and add some of the drippings until it reaches the consistency you like then season, simmer and strain.


6

Add a roux, ideally a dark roux, to your gravy. This is a standard French and Cajun (which is French-rooted) technique for giving color and body to sauces. Roux's are essentially butter or oil and flour, heated gently and stirred occasionally to cook the flour so that it darkens in color, but doesn't burn. The darker the roux, the less thickening ...


6

It sounds like you are trying to maximize the amount of pan juices, sometimes referred to be the French word jus. Any piece of meat is only going to express so much jus; if you have potatoes or other absorbent vegetables in the roasting pan, they are going to absorb it and it won't be available for another purpose such as gravy. What you still will almost ...


6

I think you probably used too much flour for the amount of liquid in your gravy — instead of gravy, you made pudding. You might be able to thin it down by whisking in some additional liquid such as milk or water before reheating it. However, next time use half (or even less) percentage of flour to liquid, and you'll have better results.


5

You can't make a 'true' gravy, but you can put a little of the water into the sauce you are using to loosen it a little if it has reduced too far, or to make it go a bit further.


5

I've never had any problem using the drippings from a brined turkey for gravy, and I've probably done 10 of them. If you're particularly concerned about it, use the neck and giblets to make a plain stock and cook that down a fair amount to concentrate the flavor. You can use that for the gravy instead of the drippings and no worries about salt. Or you can ...


5

Instant gravy packets are not known for their subtle flavor. They contain boullion, tons of salt, and some modified starch. If you don't like the flavor of a lot of that gravy then don't use it. The scrambled egg recipe that you linked to is of a particular variety. They are just barely set. This gives them a very delicate flavor and even more delicate ...


5

In their various parts of the world, all of these words mean sauce, at least some of the time. They come from different cultures, though, and carry different connotations at least in US usage. Short answer, though: there are no absolute differences that you can count on. Salsa This is a generic term in Spanish, and in South American cuisines. It can ...


5

Ricardo has a very good, authentic tasting and even smelling recipe for poutine gravy: Ingredients 2 tablespoons (30 ml) cornstarch 2 tablespoons (30 ml) water 6 tablespoons (90 ml) unsalted butter 1/4 cup (60 ml) unbleached all-purpose flour 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 2 cans 10 oz (284 ml) beef broth, undiluted 1 can 10 ounces (284 ml) chicken broth,...


4

Classic technique is to use an 'oignon brule' - cut an onion in half and caramelize on a griddle or in a heavy pan. add to the stock as it's being made. This is similar to what @Bruce's third suggestion.


4

I grilled my turkey this year, here is how I made the gravy: Cut the wing tips off Make a mirepoix (chopped carrots, celery and onions) Brown the mirepoix really well. Brown the neck, wing tips and giblets (but not the liver-fry that separately and eat it for a snack) Simmer the mirepoix and browned meat bits in a few cups of water for an hour or more to ...


4

I make sure that there are plenty of onions under the meat when roasting, but be careful not to let them burn. If you are not that keen on onion gravy just leave them out. Once the meat is done, pour off most of the oil from the cooking juices to avoid an oily gravy. Place the cooking travy on the hob over a medium / high heat. If you need to deglaze the ...


4

I use two containers when possible. The meat and the sauce usually thaw at different rates, so you end up w chunks of frozen meat embedded in thawed sauce. This can be messy to work with. Once frozen, it's OK to combine meat and sauce in a single container. Just separate when thawing.


4

I had poutine once in Canada when I was driving through. I had dinner in a diner and poutine was the advertised special. The waitress looked at me like I was from Mars when I asked what poutine was. So I only have that one experience to draw from, but the gravy tasted to me exactly like this stuff: You can buy exactly that in any grocery store in ...


4

I'm diabetic so I cannot eat those things either. Often, I will use almond flour for a thickening agent (it's just crushed almonds into flour form). You may want to visit diabetic sites (even if you do not have it), because they have figured out substitutes for a slew of foods. Not all will be perfect substitutes, though.


3

Yes you can Brine a Turkey and use the drippings. I only brine my turkey 10-12 hours. Rinse it, pat dry and let it set for a few hours. THEN put it in the oven to cook. When you go to make your gravy taste it often to make sure it doesn't get to salty. It is truly wonderful!


3

You've got this all mixed up! Unless you're deglazing to do a pan sauce, the steak should be the LAST thing cooked. It's the centerpiece of the dish and the most expensive part, and shouldn't have a chance to get cold while you cook the other parts. Saving cleaning on a single saucepan is not worth eating cold steak. You MUST use a stainless or cast-iron ...


3

The solution is very simple. Fry steak Saute onions Remove from stove, wait a minute or two Melt butter, add flour Season with heat insensitive stuff (e.g. salt) Add stock Return to stove Let simmer for a couple of minutes Season with heat sensitive stuff (e.g. fresh tarragon) Assuming that you are frying your steak below the carb charring temp ...



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