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15

They're rather different. Gyros are Greek in origin. They are simply meat, tomatoes, onion, and tzatziki sauce on pita. In Greece the meat is typically pork (never had one). In America, specifically here in Chicago (their local origin), the meat is a combination of beef & lamb. Shwawarma is Middle Eastern in origin. The possible toppings are much more ...


8

You can use it on its own as a dip with pita bread, use it as a spread on sandwiches, or as an accompaniment to fish and meat as you're already doing.


7

The primary flavors of Greek meats are lemon, oregano, and olive oil. Typically either (or both) thyme and mint are present as well. I'd start with the following base for a marinade: 1/2 cup olive oil 1/4 cup lemon juice (2-ish lemons) 2 Tbsp oregano 1.5 tsp thyme 1.5 tsp mint I'd also suggest adding some garlic and onion to this. Maybe 1/2 an onion and ...


5

I found an article (Polish) that may shed some light onto the origins of this mysterious dish. The first two paragraphs in translation: "If you were to show the Greeks fried hake or pollock filets, covered with grated carrots, braised until soft with onions and tomato concentrate, asking if they could recognize it as a Greek dish, they'd probably nod their ...


4

It's great added to flatbread wraps made with Greek or Turkish style kebabs.


4

As sarge_smith hinted at in his comment to hobodave, at least from the gyros and shwarmas I've had. Gyros are made from a loaf of ground meat, onions and seasonings, spit roasted. (this might be a regional thing, though) Shawarmas (and doner kebab) are cuts of meat, marinated and stacked, then spit roasted. As you slice the shawarma meat off the cone, ...


4

Chard isn't as tender as spinach and will require more than just light steaming lest it be chewy and fibrous. You said you want to keep its bright colors, so I would recommend blanching it in salt water. You need to add quite a bit of salt, such that it tastes like seawater. This keeps plant cells from bursting and releasing pigment. You can rinse your ...


3

You can of course use a chicken. While you won't know if it is a hen or a rooster, it should perform fine in the dish. As a braised dish, you may do well with an older bird, although these are hard to find in the modern shopping environment. You might use a roaster (which will be quite large, but older), or a stewing hen if you can get special order one. ...


3

I am afraid that it is quite hard to prepare it yourself. And you don't start from phylo dough. Kataifi is not shredded, it is spun. You need a hot metal wheel for that. It is made from a batter which is thrown on the wheel, and because the wheel is spun, it bakes on the wheel in threads. You need not only the instruments (this wheel), but also quite a bit ...


3

Taking Daniel Chui's comment about this being similar to Coq au Vin, you could take the recommendation from Good Eats, and use a stewing hen, or if you can't find that, use all dark meat (4 thighs + 4 legs) AB: Now, why would a classic dish like coq au vin call for a tough old rooster? Because, the average 17th century French country housewife had ...


3

I have many times been to Greece and have had gyros there and they are not ground meat but just like the shawarma it's pieces of meat stacked and roasted. Difference is just like the others say spices and the toppings that go into the pita. Also gyros in Greece are almost always pork meat.


2

I'm a chef, trained by "off the boat" greeks, and gyro is lamb/beef..not pork, and I find it hard to believe that the Greek family that I was trained under would be making gyro wrong.. American style is typically in a "cone" meat form, and Greek style is stacked/layered meat, then sliced as the others said..souvlaki is typically pork, which is different than ...


2

In Greece, traditionally, they used Chicken or Goat as a white meat and lamb as a dark meat. As for a marinade, try, Olive Oil, minced Garlic, fresh Tarragon and Oregano. I especially like this on Chicken. Alternatively, try a Tarragon, Garlic and Yoghurt marinade. This is good on Goat or Lamb as the Yoghurt also acts as a tenderizer. Leave it in the ...


2

I accepted JoshieSimmons' answer because my experimentation backed it up. Upon further research I also dug up the suggestions of adding baking soda (actually dulling the colors), adding olive oil to the blanching water (didn't seem to make any difference), and I saw more references to adding salt to the water. I didn't bother experimenting with adding ...


1

I'm pretty sure most, if not all chickens sold commercially are hens unless otherwise specified. I think the best bet is to ask a butcher for a rooster/capon (which I'm sure they could get for you). Barring that, I would go with a free range/organic chicken instead of a broiler/fryer hen which has no taste and probably won't work well (sounds like this is a ...


1

Greek gyros is always cuts of meat, not homogenised with herbs etc. like a donner kebab, and comes as either pork, or less commonly, chicken. In the UK what is described as 'chicken donner' or 'chicken shawarma' is almost always very similar to what is called 'chicken gyros' in Greece in terms of the meat and its appearance, though spices etc are different ...



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