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As @IMHO has stated, stainless-steel grates are the most effective way to avoid this problem. I have a set of stainless-steel grates for my weber kettle and smoker, they've never rusted and I even clean them once a year in the dishwasher. (Yes, they do fit - just barely.) They are a bit more expensive, but are worth the investment, as they are more ...


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You want thin blue smoke. While I don't have any good explanation on the chemical differences between 'blue' smoke and white smoke, there's certainly some advantage in taste. Blue smoke is a slightly cooler smolder from the wood, rather than an almost-burning-state. Use chunks of smoke-wood (roughly fist-sized chunks, rather than the coin-sized chips of ...


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I've got a very similar model smoker. Some things to consider: Ignore the temp gauge on the front. Buy an oven thermometer or a probe thermometer with multiple probe jacks and mount one on your grate. The front therm is placed in such a way that it won't ever read the grate temp, even if it was calibrated properly (it probably isn't). As the other answer ...


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It's the smoker. I had one of these, and it is extremely flawed in design. The pan that holds the charcoal does not allow for proper air flow to the fuel. Contrast this with a Weber grill, where you put your fuel on an elevated grate with plenty of air beneath it. This Char Broil instead just has a pan that you put on a shelf. Before long your coals are ...


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Because it is an open air grill, you'll just have to be mindful of the oxygen supply that gets to your charcoal. On a kettle grill, for example, the lid helps control flare-ups, because you are limiting the oxygen supply to the cooking chamber, which keeps the coals more at a smoldering level than a flaming one. When cooking in open air, however, there is ...


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GdG gives a lot of good information, but one other thing to consider about lidded vs. lidless grilling is the humidity -- with the lid down, you'll have more moist air than with the lid up. For sausages, you can start the cooking in a bath (disposable aluminum pans work well); either water, or cook 'em in beer or other flavorful liquid. Once they're cooked ...


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While if you have the opportunity to improvise a lid I recommend you do so as per the other answers, however it isn't always possible. I have unexpectedly been thrust into the "grill master" role when I've shown up to parties and the charcoal is hot, food expensive, and nobody but me knows how. In situations like this you have to do the best you can with ...


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I use a big terra cotta flower pot, turned upside down. Buy an unused one at the hardware store for less than 20 bucks. Excellent heat regulation. Also great for doing roasts in the oven at home, smoked meats, etc.


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There is no good reason to adapt to going lidless, make a lid! If you've got a lid to a roasting pan or whatever, use that. Otherwise, just use a big stainless steel mixing bowl. It'll be fine, just be sure to have good oven mitts/gloves. A cast iron skillet or Dutch oven would work well too. The shape of the grill hardly matters. Just make sure that your ...



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