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There are temperature regulators you can get for charcoal grills that control the amount of air getting into the grill to maintain a consistent temperature. Alton Brown used one in the Good Eats episode "Right on Que"; it looks like this is the model he used: http://www.amazon.com/IQ110-Temperature-Regulator-Standard-Adapter/dp/B00A7F1B60, but I am sure ...


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The temperature of a charcoal cooker is controlled by how much oxygen you allow to get to the fuel. I don't know what kind of grill you have, but typically there are one or more vents at the bottom, and one or more at the top. The bottom vents regulate oxygen supply to the fuel, while the top vents regulate air flow. If you close down all the vents, the ...


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I trim the stem and remove the outer leaves till they snap to get to the fresh inner core and steam them the night or morning before grilling so they are cold and moist. I prefer steaming because I want all of the nutrients to remain in the artichoke. I cut them in half for the grill, remove the choke and brush them with grapeseed oil where they come into ...


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What you have is rust. You'll want to strip the grates down and re-season them I've had mixed-luck over the years with cast iron grates on gas grills -- yes, they cook things really well, but if you leave the burners on high to burn off any food bits left on the grates after cooking, you'll risk burning off the seasoning ... which then leads to rusting.


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"Are they OK to cook on?" can mean: Will I die within 24 hours after using them? No! Will I die within a few years? No! Will I get ill within a few years if I use them daily and lick all the juice off them after each use? Meh, very probably not! Does it look gross? Yes! So, thoroughly clean them before each use with a copper wire brush and ...


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Here is what I tried from a combination of google results. They turned out great. Rinse the artichokes. Remove any leaves from the stem of the artichoke and any that may fall off during cooking. With kitchen shears, or sharp scissors, remove the thorny tips from the leaves. Cut about an inch off of the top of the artichoke. Rub lemon on the exposed ...


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When you say "place the pieces on the grill", you seem to be missing the concept that a lot of kebabs aren't actually grilled on what we call a "grill" in America (and a lot of the world)... meaning a open surface like the one you posted an image of: When I've seen "grills" they are simply open coal spaces with a rack for holding the skewers, so the meat ...


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Historically, the practice of skewering meat had several advantages over building a rotisserie and cooking a single large piece of meat. Think about the advantages of cooking over a primitive camp fire, rather than a modern grill: Cooks quicker, saving time but more importantly fuel for the fire (think desert or other difficult terrain) Did not require ...


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Your polenta was probably sticking because you didn't use enough oil or your barbecue was too cool. Olive oil on a barbecue is a bad idea as it flares up and burns easily, you're better off with a more standard vegetable oil. The choice of oil is not as important as the quantity in keeping things from sticking, you need to use a lot of it. I use a high ...



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