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19

Put the meat in a sealed plastic bag, place in a bowl in the sink, fill with cold tapwater, then set the tap running in a thin stream with the water overflowing the sides of the bowl. The moving water will safely thaw the meat through convection. Make sure you get as much air out of the plastic bag as you can. You might need to put some weight on it in ...


14

Transfer of heat. First you need a hot pan (sprinkle some drops of water on the pan, it should sizzle). Then you add a drop of oil and swirl it around. When the oil forms a striated pattern, it's hot. Then you put the meat in. The hot oil helps to transfer heat from the bottom of the pan to the meat. You only need a spoonful of oil.


14

I'm not sure what causes the bowing to be more pronounced from one cooking method versus another, but the solution is to put a thumbprint indentation in the middle, creating a slight "donutted" shape. This will help to ensure you get the "patty" shape you want.


12

The meat is brown on the inside not due to too much oxygen but due to a lack of oxygen. Oxygen can pass through the packaging but not, generally, through the meat itself. Thus, the interior of the meat runs out of oxygen faster than the exterior (which is still exposed to oxygen from the air) and browns for this reason. I'll quote the full-explanation ...


11

I have always found a glass bowl and a metal colander works best. I pour it in the sink to handle any splashes that occur.


11

Well, all I can say is 'it depends on the dish'. If the dish calls for fat to be added otherwise, you can keep that fat and count it where you would add some later. If the dish is just adding hamburger and no more fat - I agree, discard it. That said - I don't find hamburger fat particularly flavorful and nearly always strain it and add another kind of ...


10

If you're really in a hurry then you can't beat the microwave. It might defrost a little unevenly, but assuming you plan to brown it or something afterward, then that will take care of evening it out. The microwave is perfectly safe; the key point about food safety here is not allowing the meat to sit in the "danger zone" (basically more than a few degrees ...


10

It could be from some kind of seasoning such as paprika. It depends on the dish really.


9

Like you said, the main benefit is control. I'd say the two main variables you're controlling for are amount of fat in the mixture and the tenderness and quality of the cuts used. Depending on the application, you might use a different mixture of meat. (For burgers, Alton Brown uses a 50/50 mixture of chuck and sirloin.) Grinding your own could also be ...


9

This should depend greatly on what the item is. Hamburgers generally run clear, possibly slightly bloody if undercooked. The only example of this I can think of would be the odd orange drippings from "taco meat". The cause of that is soluble coloring agents or spices in the drippings.


8

The best way I've found to get rid of the fat that renders out of beef while browning is using a paper towel. Tilt the pan (using biger makes this easier) a little to one side while holding the beef against the other with a wooden spoon, this should make most of the grease pool on the tilted side. Lower the pan till almost flat, the beef should stay to it's ...


8

In the US, hamburgers are usually flat patties weighing somewhere between 3 and 8oz. and typically 100% ground beef. Many variations are possible, including mixing spices and other ingredients into the meat, but binders such as egg and breadcrumbs are not common. The defining characteristics of a proper hamburger for most Americans are the shape (flat), ...


8

It is absolutely worth adding ground pork or veal. I usually use a leaner ground steak and compensate with a fatty ground pork (shoulder is good) - fat = flavour. Another tip is to take your time. Many people try and cook bolognese in half an hour, but considering ground meat is usually made with tougher cuts, you end up with tough meat and under-developed ...


8

Fry the mince in a saucepan big enough to hold the sauce until it's brown all over, add the sauce and simmer for an hour or two. Mince is usually made from cheap cuts of meat. This means, while it will technically be cooked after a few minutes, it will also be tough and chewy. Browning it in the pan then simmering it slowly in the sauce will result in nice ...


7

There is a common misconception that you should absolutely never cook meat from frozen or near-frozen. This is incorrect. I would also not recommended putting any meat on a low heat to thaw it out - you are asking for tough meat at best and food poisoning at worst. The aim when cooking meat is to bring the internal temperature up to a safe level for a ...


6

I use a baster and have never had a problem with the top part getting too hot, perhaps you could consider getting a bigger one so that the fat doesn't get near the top? Another option to consider is putting a lid on the pan and tilting it, over a suitable receptacle, then cracking the lid open slightly to allow the fat to drain out without releasing any of ...


6

I cut the top of a soda can off, use a grease screen over the beef and drain it into the can. Let it sit and it will harden so you can throw it away. Grease in the sink is very bad for your pipes.


6

Store them as you would the unground beef. If it will be still be in date after a few days, store it in the fridge, otherwise, freeze them (separating the patties with a sheet of greaseproof paper).


5

You can try going with the classic Boy Scout "hobo" stew. Put your beef, some sliced potatoes, carrots, celery into a foil that you then fold up completely to make a "poche" or pocket. In this case the potatoes will absorb some of the grease...you'll still have the flavor. But you are still going to have a lot of fat, such is the nature of 80/20 beef. ...


5

To help get uniformly broken up ground beef: Choose an at least moderately fatty (say 80-85%) grind, as very lean ground beef will tend to stick to itself more. Don't compress it when you are bringing it home, as by setting other groceries on top. Don't salt the meat before cooking, as salt tends to help it bind to itself. Break it up into chunks with your ...


4

Instead of, or in addition to egg, try a panade of bread soaked in milk. I believe Cook's Illustrated uses this technique in one of their burger recipes to enhance flavor or texture. It will act as a binder as well.


4

The reddish-orange color is almost certainly paprika or another ground chili. This imparts its fiery color to the juice and the oil used in cooking. Oh, and also to any softer plastic you may leave it in, such as tupperware containers.


4

Weigh the ground meat before starting to determine its total weight. Render as much fat as possible in the ground meat by boiling or simmering. Use a fat separator to separate off the fat Allow the fat to dry (or dry it by gently bringing to >100°C/212°F, beware splattering). Weigh the amount of fat rendered. Fat percentage is 100 × (fat weight) ÷ (total ...


4

There are legitimate reasons, and one is because you loose more than just the grease if you strain it, as the meat will give off other liquid. Instead, the way I learned to do it is to push the ground meat to one side or make a sort of well where the liquid will collect (and you can tip the pan slightly to that side, if you need to), and then collect the ...


4

It is not only sane, it is safer than any other packaging you can make. At least here in Germany, meat from the supermarket is not just wrapped in celophane, the celophane is glued to the tray. The packaging is air-proof. And the air inside the packaging is not normal air, it is a mostly sterile atmosphere with a composition different from normal air, ...


4

You answered your own question. Add cold water and break up the clumps with your hands. My Italian grandfather used this method for his meat sauce. I also see hot dog stands use the same technique to make their chili sauce. So long as you don't boil all of the liquid away the meat will not clump.


4

You'll have different techniques for different recipes. The most important thing is not to overcook it ... but with ground meat and ground poultry in particulary, you want to make sure you've cooked it long enough to be safe. For amalgameats, like meatloaf and meatballs, the common technique is a panade, breadcrumbs soaked in milk, and adding vegetables ...


4

Ground beef does not work well in any traditional stir-fry or soupy dish, though there are probably one or two that actually call for it But it does work well, and is actually used in China for stuffed items. Some deep fried or steamed pastry rolls ("dim sum") or steamed buns have some ground beef in the filling In my experience it was a very coarse grind, ...


3

For my part, I suggest you explore the wonders of Spaghetti, and that most American of dishes, the "Sloppy Joe." You can try adding binders like egg and/or peanut butter (or bananas if you're vegan, har har) in order to firm up your beef for pan frying (forget the grill, it ain't happenin), but, while that will help, it'll definitely change the ...



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