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14

You don't have to thicken things with a roux, and a roux doesn't have to be made with oil. A French roux is made with butter (this is how I usually make it). Other options for thickening include a slurry (flour well mixed with cold water or milk), corn starch (also mixed with cold water first), a Beurre Manié (a paste of butter and flour), or depending ...


14

I wouldn't recommend it. Dark roux is actually a pretty weak thickener compared to a light roux. As you get darker, it's more of a flavoring. Flour on its own gives an obvious raw flour taste. As an alternate method to make darker rouxes, search for 'oven roux', where you're working with a more easily controlled, even heat, as opposed to something that ...


12

Making a roux has two purposes: Coat the flour granules with fat so they are able to dissolve into the cooking liquid without binding up. Cook the flour to remove the raw cereal flavor. When the cooked, fat-covered, flour is introduced to boiling liquid the starch granules swell and explode tangling up the cooking liquid. The cooking liquid is thus ...


12

Yep, that'll be fine. For other purposes, it might not be your favorite - sometimes it can get a little more of the "slimy" coating that people don't like - but since you're cooking it in gumbo, it's all just going to get taken up into the stew (where it'll provide some thickening, as intended), so no worries. A little more, if you're curious: okra contains ...


11

Gumbo is a creolized (blending of different cultures) dish that was really a way of making use of many whatever might be on hand. The word "Gumbo" itself comes from the African Bantu tribal language which uses the word "Ngambo" for okra. In the plantation culture of the south "ngambo" became "gumbo" and eventually came to be the word for a soup containing ...


8

I think the problem is that in the original recipe you would have browned the veggies in the roux, which develops flavor. Since you didn't do that, you might want to saute some onions and garlic until well browned and add that in. Other possibilities: (1) Sauce may just need to reduce and become more concentrated (2) May need more salt (3) May need a little ...


7

I can think of a couple answers here: The larger volume of soup in the pot stayed hot much longer than in tupperware, and so it continued to cook, or fermented/spoiled overnight. If the pot was aluminum and the gumbo acidic, the two reacted. I've seen this happen with long-simmered, acidic stocks. The color changes, and the flavor sometimes does too.


7

Once you've boiled the carcass, most of the juices, fats, etc. have been released. Trying to do a second pass will result in a much weaker stock. There's only so much that can be released, and it's already happened on the first pass. You should just choose one thing to make, or buy a second chicken, I'm afraid.


4

I was born and raised in the heart of Cajun country. My entire family loves gumbo, especially my moms. This is what I learned: get the roux as dark as possible without burning it (that makes the best gumbo). I think that's what happened to yours; you probably got it just right. Then you add the other ingredients so that it mellows down the bitter taste. ...


3

When you make your roux, the slurry of flour and hot oil (lard tastes better) does not have to done at an extremely hot temperature. Just make sure you have the flour and oil/lard mixed well before adding other liquids -- for a good gumbo you'll want to use about a cup of coffee (black, and preferably with chicory - Café Du Monde, or my favorite Community ...


3

I'm guessing that you were tasting a deep, concentrated char the first time, just shy of burnt (most likely in the roux itself). The simmering afterwards mellowed it, giving you the perfect (you may never duplicate it) level of caramelization in the final gumbo.


2

I cook gumbo all the time. I usually cook large gumbo for parties.. 30 quarts or greater at a time. I can tell you from experience exactly what is happening... And one of the answers above is right on. Your roux is not mixing due to a temperature issue. I ALWAYS use 2 pots when making a gumbo... No matter what kind of gumbo it is. I use a cast iron ...


2

You might try doing the roux and chicken stock in a separate pan. Make the roux, and when it starts to turn golden (or dark brown - your choice), pour in a cup of stock and whisk continuously while adding. This will make a gravy like substance, to which you can add the rest of the stock to thin out to the correct consistency. There's really no reason to ...


2

As for working, they will certainly work. A cook can learn to use pots with irregular heating patterns. The bigger problem is, can you work with large pots? If no, then your plan won't work, independently of the pot thickness you choose. A pot of this size just doesn't behave like a small pot. It will have a heat gradient vertically, and, unless you have a ...


1

I like the aluminum cored stainless better than bare aluminum. Lots of ingredients react with aluminum that can distinctly affect color and taste of food.


1

How can I fix the slimey texture. Okra produces slime because the Okra plant and its fruit contain nasty stuff called mucilage. When you apply heat to the Gumbo, the slime comes out. But there are a few techniques for reducing all that sliminess, namely pan frying or grilling prior to adding it to the Gumbo.


1

How long did the garlic cook before adding the liquid? Cooking garlic more than a few seconds can result in a bitter taste. About 30 seconds is the max I use.


1

Being raised in a cajun kitchen, roux was the first thing we learned to make from my mommom.I would say it could not have been burned and taste good.Roux that is really burned is awful,bitter to taste.We always cook roux on low heat.It takes longer but is worth it.


1

My guess is you burned the roux without realizing it. Rouxs should not be cooked on high heat; medium is best. You don't want to rush it. Here is a link about roux. You can also google the Alton Brown episode where he talks about roux. He has a method for cooking it in the oven to whatever shade you desire, with little to no chance of burning. Like ...


1

I usually have this same problem when I make a really big batch of gumbo. I've tried all of the usual stuff: adding cold stock to hot roux, hot stock to cold roux, doing an extra vigorous boil. None of it worked. I've come to believe the adding cold to hot trick is old kitchen lore that has no scientific foundation. To settle this, I read some academic ...



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