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11

Yep, that'll be fine. For other purposes, it might not be your favorite - sometimes it can get a little more of the "slimy" coating that people don't like - but since you're cooking it in gumbo, it's all just going to get taken up into the stew (where it'll provide some thickening, as intended), so no worries. A little more, if you're curious: okra contains ...


10

Making a roux has two purposes: Coat the flour granules with fat so they are able to dissolve into the cooking liquid without binding up. Cook the flour to remove the raw cereal flavor. When the cooked, fat-covered, flour is introduced to boiling liquid the starch granules swell and explode tangling up the cooking liquid. The cooking liquid is thus ...


10

Gumbo is a creolized (blending of different cultures) dish that was really a way of making use of many whatever might be on hand. The word "Gumbo" itself comes from the African Bantu tribal language which uses the word "Ngambo" for okra. In the plantation culture of the south "ngambo" became "gumbo" and eventually came to be the word for a soup containing ...


8

I think the problem is that in the original recipe you would have browned the veggies in the roux, which develops flavor. Since you didn't do that, you might want to saute some onions and garlic until well browned and add that in. Other possibilities: (1) Sauce may just need to reduce and become more concentrated (2) May need more salt (3) May need a little ...


7

I can think of a couple answers here: The larger volume of soup in the pot stayed hot much longer than in tupperware, and so it continued to cook, or fermented/spoiled overnight. If the pot was aluminum and the gumbo acidic, the two reacted. I've seen this happen with long-simmered, acidic stocks. The color changes, and the flavor sometimes does too.


2

It's just a stab in the dark, but I'm guessing that you were tasting a deep, concentrated char the first time, just shy of burnt (most likely in the roux itself). The simmering afterwards mellowed it, giving you the perfect (probably never to be duplicated) level of caramelization in the final gumbo.


2

You might try doing the roux and chicken stock in a separate pan. Make the roux, and when it starts to turn golden (or dark brown - your choice), pour in a cup of stock and whisk continuously while adding. This will make a gravy like substance, to which you can add the rest of the stock to thin out to the correct consistency. There's really no reason to ...


1

I cook gumbo all the time. I usually cook large gumbo for parties.. 30 quarts or greater at a time. I can tell you from experience exactly what is happening... And one of the answers above is right on. Your roux is not mixing due to a temperature issue. I ALWAYS use 2 pots when making a gumbo... No matter what kind of gumbo it is. I use a cast iron ...


1

How long did the garlic cook before adding the liquid? Cooking garlic more than a few seconds can result in a bitter taste. About 30 seconds is the max I use.


1

Being raised in a cajun kitchen, roux was the first thing we learned to make from my mommom.I would say it could not have been burned and taste good.Roux that is really burned is awful,bitter to taste.We always cook roux on low heat.It takes longer but is worth it.


1

My guess is you burned the roux without realizing it. Rouxs should not be cooked on high heat; medium is best. You don't want to rush it. Here is a link about roux. You can also google the Alton Brown episode where he talks about roux. He has a method for cooking it in the oven to whatever shade you desire, with little to no chance of burning. Like ...



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