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17

It's probably even safe to eat without cooking again; the refrigerator is likely only about 10 degrees colder, and that generally translates to accelerating rates of spoilage (mostly growth of pathogens) by a factor of 3-5 or so. For example. at 10C (50F), E. coli only manages to divide once every 8 hours or so (see Ratkowsky et al., "Relationship Between ...


10

I posted this question in a hurry (because as you can imagine), there was a lot of anxiety concerning whether it was safe to have dinner or not. It turns out that this ham is not safe; I will quote the USDA: The plastic bone guard covering the exposed bone is used to keep the bone from breaking the outer wrap. If left on the meat during cooking, a ...


9

I fully endorse the "when in doubt, throw it out" doctrine, although I personally wouldn't consider a sweet taste to be doubt. As rfusca wisely points out, you can't taste or smell several kinds of contamination, and the ones that you can taste or smell, are usually sour, bitter, or generally pungent. I suggest you have a look at the following question: Is ...


7

This is a ham right? Not a bone-in cooked pork butt, but an actual cured ham? This falls into the category I like to call "Things I personally would eat, but wouldn't feed to anyone else." Chances are it's fine. 80 years ago they'd have thought nothing of it, but in our modern bacteria-obsessed culture, a few hours sitting on the counter is certain death. ...


6

If the ham picked up anything like botulinus then the toxic waste products are not destroyed by re-cooking... so the ham would remain toxic. So the safe advice would be to throw it away. And from a self-preservation point, I can't possibly advise anything else. However, ham is full of preservatives (that's why it's ham not pork!) and it's probably safe ...


5

If you're going to simmer your chili for a long time, just throw it in there. If you made stock with it, you'd still be just simmering the bone for a long time to extract the same flavors. (I'm not advocating not using stock here, just that I wouldn't make stock for the sole purpose of getting flavor out of the bone. Use the stock you would otherwise.). ...


4

If you're referring to the dried ham Jamón , then I'd say no. As a general rule if any meat has gone far enough for anything out of the ordinary to grow on it, I throw it out. For every bit of nast' that you see, there are probably 10 million more that you don't. Cheese, on the other hand, I cut moldy pieces off all the time.


4

When I did this as a kid with my mom, we just put food dye (the same we put in the eggs) on the slices of ham. As someone who has tried this though, I have to strongly recommend you don't. While it's easy to get around the fact that the eggs you're about to eat are green, ham that's green just doesn't look right. It was a struggle to eat it even though I ...


4

Techincally, ham is the cut of meat (the rear leg of the pig)--so what you prepared was a fresh ham roast, or just a pork roast. You happened to brine it preparation. The term ham has also come to mean the cured pork product--or now, with so-calle turkey ham and whatnot on the market, similar cured meat products. "Fresh ham" emphasizes that you have the ...


4

In Ireland boiled or glazed ham is a staple. Traditionally it's had with cut up cabbage (ideally you would cook the cabbage in the same water the ham was boiled in as this gives it lovely flavour) but you could just cut it up and pan fry it with a little butter. Normally it would be served with boiled floury potatoes. Traditionally (in Ireland) you ...


4

The official answer is generally only a few days for meat in the fridge ... Ham can be different, as it's salt cured, so depending on the salt content can last longer without freezing it. As for freezing it, it really depends on how you plan to use it: It's most convenient to cut it up in the same way that you're going to use it, so that you can just ...


4

They would be fresh hams, the hindquarter of a pig. The word ham, unmodified, implies a cured product. I would imagine that for a feral hog, if you are willing to risk eating it, that you should cook to the highest temperature reasonable, which in the case of a fresh ham might be at least 180 F, and as high as 200 F. The best application at these ranges ...


3

Pineapple brings a touch of acidity, sweetness, and general fruitiness. I am going to assume you would have been using canned pineapple, so the enzymatic action is not really a factor (and it would be stopped as part of the cooking process). It is also hearty enough in texture to stand up to the baking. For the juice, I would recommend basic orange juice, ...


3

Dextrose is another name for the sugar glucose. In the US most powdered dextrose and/or glucose syrups are produced from corn starch, in the UK and other European countries they may be made from wheat or other starchy plant sources. According to a 2008 study from Finland, even though wheat based glucose syrup was found to contain low amounts of residual ...


3

First, consider substituting the recipe altogether as replacing the main meat and expecting similar results is just unreasonable. That said, here are some broad suggestions: Pork Tenderloin: Veal tenderloin. Pork Chops: Veal chops, or even Chicken breast. General non-cured pork meats: Veal. Pork Sasauges: Beef sausages of the same spice mix. (you'll need ...


3

This is really an issue of risk. The USDA's recommendation is not to consume meat that has experienced more than four hours of cumulative time between 40° and 140° F. Essentially, that means that the level of risk of illness from food-borne pathogens is acceptable in that range. The government's position is that 5 hours beyond a level of risk that they are ...


3

Since it's already fully-cooked, you don't need to be all that precise with time or temperature. The most important thing is to avoid drying it out, so use a roasting pan and add a little water to the bottom (not more than 1 cm) and cover it while it's reheating. It's best if you have a meat thermometer; toss it in at 300° F / 150° C (or up to 350° F / ...


3

Based on my experiences with sweet-and-sour asian dishes, I'd say good or even okay mango would work just as well, if not be an improvement. (I find canned pineapple or pineapple juice to be cloying or bland compared to fresh, and generally like mango better in savoury foods.) If you're going to puree / juice, and not eat it as-is, you can "fix" it not being ...


3

It depends on your oven and how big the hams are. If you try to cram 2 big hams into your oven and it's not a fan oven then you probably need to add extra time. If they are moderate size then it shouldn't make much difference at all. If they are big but you have a fan oven then you shouldn't need to add time. The best way to make sure something is done is ...


2

I don't know about if it's safe or not, but what I can tell you (if indeed we are talking about dry-cured ham) that for it to grow mold you had to have handled it improperly. Cured ham should never be refrigerated (most common cause for mold to grow on it), stored in plastic wrap, or anything that bumps up humidity or lowers a lot temperature. If you live ...


2

You find that storing in the fridge is going to give you the longest life span. Hanging will keep keep the process of drying out continuing , which will intensify the flavour but will eventually become jerky texture. Wrapping will keep a little moisture in longer. If you do keep it for a period of time , you will develop a white mould which I will just cut ...


2

If it's been fully cured (smoked, then hung for a few months), it likely just needs to be warmed through for serving (or even just sliced). If it's soft, you might need to cook it, and then you could roast it in the oven ... a crock pot might be okay; it's hard to say without having seen it. But if it's quite firm, I'd likely just slice pieces off like you ...


2

Extra water in cooked ham is 100% fine to eat, see here. In general, you can use the printed "use by" date if you're in the US and you'll be safe. I'm adding my answer to provide an authoritative source for you, so you'll know for certain you won't get sick from it. Quotation, for @adamlynch: HAM: In order to be labeled as "Ham," the product must be at ...


2

The short answer is yes, you most definitely can but with a few caveats. First, if the skin has any significant amount of sugar on/in it from a glaze or cure it will burn fairly quickly and likely impart a bitter flavor before you are going to achieve the proper crisp a crackling is known for. Also, with hams, there is likely going to be a ton of salt in the ...


2

No, cooking two roasts at once will not change the cooking time for either. Remove each when it is cooked through. Since these are fresh ham roasts, you should be cooking them until they are done to the standard are using, not based on a single time. If you are using a low and slow method, there is enough flexibility that you can probably leave them in ...


1

Per FoodSafety.gov (a service of the US Department of Health and Human Services), such a fresh ham can be stored 3-5 days before cooking, and 3-4 days after cooking. (Note that the applicable category for this product is "fresh ham.") How you store the remainder (whole, slicing, cubing) is up to you, and is more about what is convenient for how you plan ...


1

I'm not sure there is a real solution to your issue. Once pasta is cooked and mixed you should eat it. If it is a 'hot' pasta receipt (e.g. "spaghetti al pomodoro") and then you put in the fridge and open it the next day, you'll have the same problem, with the difference that you might warm it again thus making the excess of water evaporate. Any time you ...


1

Have you tried steaming pasta, after boiling it in the water? I highly recommend you let pasta stay in the oven with very low heat, for 20 minutes, then you will see that there is no more liquid. Also it gives the macaroni a spongy condition which makes it able to keep the liquid in it. I believe if you steamed the cook before mixing with ...


1

Morton's Tender Quick is a fast cure salt meant to be mixed in with ground meats or used for curing thinner cuts (or fish). Hams must be brined for days in order for the salt solution to penetrate deeply through the flesh and prevent spoilage. It is important to follow good curing protocol and use the amount of salt as requested in the recipe. Sodium ...


1

Differences are mainly a question of origin. Speck comes from Tyrol (it actually means "bacon" in german, which is misleading) and is prepared with a specific blend of spices, usually including juniper, Jamon Serrano from Spain (it means "mountain ham" in spanish) and is a dry-cured ham, and prosciutto just means "ham" in italian. There are plenty of ...



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