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40

First, do not eat that. Regardless what color the beef is, two weeks is entirely too long to refrigerate ground beef. It is unsafe and should be thrown out. Raw ground beef only keeps in the refrigerator for 1-2 days. Ignoring storage time, regarding color, brown meat is as safe to eat as red meat. As others have indicated it is simply oxidation occurring. ...


30

I'm not going to comment on whether or not it is safe, because that could be any number of issues other than the brown coloring of the meat. However, the brown in and of itself is not an issue. When meat is exposed to air it turns a brown color. This does not effect the falvor of the meat, but the color turns a lot of people off. Grocery stores will actually ...


24

This scum is made from proteins. Meat contains muscle fibers (the proteins actin and myosin) as well as some loose proteins swimming in the fluids within the meat (the cell plasma). When you cook meat, the protein-rich fluids are expelled (that's why overcooking makes meat dry). Under hot temperature, the proteins in the fluid coagulate, making it firm. It ...


17

I'm solidly in the flip as often as you want camp. As long as it's not over (or under) cooked I find that you get better results flipping often. Plus you can rearrange things to make more room as you flip. To tell how cooked a burger is poke it with a finger or something else that's not too sharp; just like a steak the more cooked it is the more firm it ...


15

I'm not sure what causes the bowing to be more pronounced from one cooking method versus another, but the solution is to put a thumbprint indentation in the middle, creating a slight "donutted" shape. This will help to ensure you get the "patty" shape you want.


15

You take a small amount out, cook it and taste it. It is the classic way, for instance, to know if sausage is going to be good after it is cooked but before you put it into casing.


13

The right way is simple and straightforward: preheat the skillet for about 5-10 minutes on medium, add a few table spoons of oil to coat the bottom, and continue cooking at this temperature. Flip regularly, to allow the sides to cook evenly, and wait for the middle to become fully cooked. Now I will tell you all the ways NOT to cook a hamburger with a ...


12

Yes, it can change the taste quite significantly. Here's an easy experiment that you can do: Make a sandwich, but spread mustard on only one of the pieces of bread. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side up. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side down. Mouth feel is affected as well, but not quite as dramatically.


12

Beef has a firm, closed texture, which prevents bacteria penetrating far into the meat. This is why it's relatively safe to eat a rare steak: you kill the surface bacteria by searing it, and the middle is relatively bacteria free. When you grind beef, you of course mix the surface with the middle, which increases the risk. To be safe, you should therefore ...


10

There are a couple of things that jump out at me: 170 F (77 C) - This is overkill for ground beef. The USDA guidelines recommend 160 F (71 C). Venting holes - This is unnecessary. There is no need to "vent" a hamburger. What you're doing is creating holes for the juices to flow out of and get vaporized on the pan. This is likely a significant source of the ...


9

Have you tried not adding egg? In my experiments, egg is needed when you add breadcrumbs, but if you just form some ground beef into a patty and fry it, it doesn't fall apart. Hm, let me clarify that. If you take a single blob of ground beef straight from the styrofoam and press it in a patty press, it doesn't fall apart. If you take two pieces and put them ...


9

The differences are as follows: Quinoa is a pseudocerial coming from goosefoot wikipedia. It is one of the trendy "superfoods" because it has a very high nutritional value ánd is gluten free. I have always used it as a grain substitute and do not know if it's any good as the main ingredient for a burger. Quorn is a meat substitute made of mycoprotein from ...


8

We have been eating turkey burgers for years. The super secret is to not let them dry out while cooling. I take a pound of ground turkey, mixed 2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 2 shakes garlic powder and 1/2 teaspoon of water. Then mix thoroughly by hand. After patty-ing them to 1/4 inch thick patties, I grill for about 5-6 ...


8

A bit of corn starch would help if you cannot add egg at all.


8

In the US, hamburgers are usually flat patties weighing somewhere between 3 and 8oz. and typically 100% ground beef. Many variations are possible, including mixing spices and other ingredients into the meat, but binders such as egg and breadcrumbs are not common. The defining characteristics of a proper hamburger for most Americans are the shape (flat), ...


8

The stretch and fold method is great for making breads, but most buns like this are made using something closer to the Chorleywood Process (or No Time method). Instead of resting time with stretches and folds and bulk fermentation time, this method relies on combinations of dough conditioners and heavy mechanical mixing. This usually means that the dough is ...


8

You're right with your assumption that surface bacteria should to be killed and by the process of grinding meat the surfaces bateria mixes into the interior. BUT: There is also steak tartare which is basically minced beef consumed raw. The trick is to get the meat from a trustworthy source, store it at low temperatures, process it in an environment which is ...


7

Make sure you don't squirt the fluid all over the grill. Keep it on the charcoal. If you have to apply more fluid after you've lit it, you're doing it wrong. Douse the charcoal then wait a few minutes for it to soak in. This is a common mistake. People often pour on the fluid and immediately light it. It then burns away before the charcoal can ignite ...


7

Your buns are likely sticking to the bottom of the tray. If they stick, they will expand vertically because they can't expand horizontally. They're stuck. Dust the trays with semolina flour, rice flour, and/or fine corn meal. You can even lightly dust them with white or rye flour, but the aforementioned flours are preferable. If you're retarding the buns, ...


7

Summary or "detailed" instructions: flip frequently, and if it's still cooking too fast on the outside and too slow on the inside, adjust the temperature down a little. Maybe you'll take two or three tries to get it perfect, but such is life. Medium-high probably means somewhere between halfway and maximum on your stove. There's no temperature, don't worry ...


7

I often use this technique at home to cook proteins. It shortens cooking time by using steam as a heat transfer medium to cook the top of the item at the same time as the bottom. You can also use this method on frittatas, dumplings, etc. You can also use flavored liquids to impart flavor as well. I particularly like hard cider with chicken and pork.


6

I have a version of baked beans I make in a crock pot that cook for 24 hours on low. I've used a thermometer to verify that, once it comes up to temperature, it stays right at a simmer the entire time, which is above the 165F necessary to keep it "safe". I did the verification because of some of the horrified looks I got when I told people that these beans ...


6

food is safe so long as the Crockpot is on, and functioning correctly. The food will maintain a simmer as long as its on, which is too hot for bacteria.


6

In addition to the fat content, making sure the meat is cold while forming can help.


6

I found this article really interesting. It covers a chef's attempts to make a turkey burger taste good. The recommendation is to puree some eggplant with it (to improve the moisture level), and add soy sauce, marmite and anchovies to make it taste good.


6

I don't endorse beef in the microwave, but that said, the best possible way to cook it is going to be on one of the microwave plates that raise your food off the plate. (the ones that look like the inside of a george foreman grill) You are going to have to play with your power settings a bit to achieve a optimium patty. In mine, it's 2:30 at 40 percent ...


6

Hamburgers are beef. Buy meat from a source that you trust, and taste them raw :) EDIT in response to OP comment: Food borne pathogens can be insidious; cooking them to death is one way to handle them; another way is risk management to avoid bringing them into the kitchen at all. Pork is traditionally required to be cooked because of Trichinella ...


6

Use only good beef, salt and pepper. The beef should be a good fatty cut, with a ratio of 80% meat, 20% fat. Chuck is ideal. Any good butcher should grind it to order for you. You need to keep the ground meat as cold as possible, to prevent the fat melting out of it before you cook it. Do not salt the beef prior to shaping, just use pepper. Shape your ...



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