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25

I've never adjusted the length of time based on number of eggs. As long as the water is boiling I don't think it would take any longer to cook a dozen than to cook one (it might take the water longer to come up to boiling, I guess). For hard boiled I normally bring them up to the boil and then turn the heat off, and leave them for 15 minutes. If you like ...


23

Take an egg from the carton and 'spin' it on the work counter. If it spins, it's cooked, if it does anything else, it's not.


20

There is a whole science on that. Simply saying: source: blog.khymos.org Where: t - time T - temperature M - mass in grams While this is for soft-boiling eggs, I believe you can easily adjust it for hard-boiling. Even an application, that cosiders all the variables, exists: Kunsten å koke et egg - Google translated While for me this is far more ...


16

This is caused by overcooking the egg. The green color is a result of overheating causing the iron and sulfur compounds in the egg to express. You can prevent it by gently boiling the egg, and plunging it into an ice bath when it is done. This stops the carry-over heat from continuing to cook the egg.


14

Yes, they really are unsafe after a week. According to the USDA (similar information can be found from other food agencies): Why do hard-cooked eggs spoil faster than fresh eggs? When shell eggs are hard cooked, the protective coating is washed away, leaving bare the pores in the shell for bacteria to enter and contaminate it. Hard-cooked eggs ...


9

Yes, it certainly is safe to eat them, it happens all the time. They won't last quite as long in the fridge as ones which don't crack, but as long as you eat them in a couple of days you are fine. They may look like nuclear mutants but they will taste the same.


7

The main reason eggs crack while boiling isn't because they are already cracked, but because of the sudden change in temperature from cold to hot. The same thing can happen to glass or metal, or practically any substance. (I've actually broken a glass coffee table top once by setting a pie pan out of the oven on top of it to cool... after a couple minutes, ...


7

I don't boil eggs enough to keep a feel for the timing... So a few years back, I picked up a handful of these. They're sold under a few different names, but the idea is the same: sturdy plastic that changes color as it heats. Drop it in with the eggs, and pull & chill them all when the color band hits the spot you're looking for.


7

It boils down to chemical make up. Avocados, like egg yolks, contain a decent amount of fats, carotenoids, and sulfurous compounds. Avocados are one of the most concentrated fruit sources of fats and fatty acids. Both egg yolks and avocados contain carotenoid phytochemicals like lutein, zeaxathanin, and a-carotene. In avocados the sulphur is mostly in the ...


7

As long as the water is actually boiling the whole time, then there is no difference whatsoever. Boiling water can only have one temperature (around 100 C, but adjusted somewhat for altitude or impurities in the water), and it stays at that temperature as long as it's in a state of boiling. Keeping the heat up only serves to hasten the transition from water ...


7

I'm 75 and I eat hardboiled eggs and have for many years.keep them in fridge for salmon &tuna salad. Never made me sick and I sometimes keep longer than 2 weeks.


6

This is probably not what you want to hear on any front, but it is best to store your eggs in their shell. Their original carton provides an ideal container. If you do want to store them peeled, the standard way to do it is refrigerated in a bowl of water (changed daily). Of course, you will then have to dry the egg before eating it the wetness bothers ...


5

I'm not sure there is a definitive way to cook hard boiled eggs, but the guidelines I tend to follow are: Don't cook eggs straight from the fridge, let them adjust to room temperature. Don't use fast boiling water, a gentle roll is enough For soft boiled eggs, place them in boiling water (enough to cover the egg by about 2cm) for one minute. Remove from ...


5

I agree with @jwenting, 5-7 minutes in boiling water is the way to go. Remember to always put the eggs in cold water, if you put them in hot water you risk cracking the shell, especially if eggs are cold. Also, to avoid premature cracking of the shell, that may leave some egg white leaking out, add a spoon of vinegar (should work with lemon juice too) to ...


5

Just watch the clock, it's the most (if not only) reliable way. And make sure the water stays at or just under boil of course. There's no difference between cooking them on gas or electric, it's just a different way of heating the water :) Depending on how firm you want them, 5-7 minutes should usually be enough in boiling water.


4

The USDA recommends storing hard boiled eggs, whether peeled or not, for 1 week. I personally have kept & eaten them after 2-3 weeks. I have also cracked one open that was no longer edible & believe me - You will know when that happens! The egg will will smell rotten & you will have no question as to whether or not to eat it! Some additional Info ...


4

This is what we do where I work: dump them into a bucket full of cold water with the tap still running. We crack the side of the shell against the side of the sink & roll it til it's cracked all around, then peel. I am sure there are other ways though. I think shocking them helps them shell easily, but also cools them down for foodsafe reasons.


4

Salt or acid is often added to the water when boiling eggs to denature egg whites faster should there be a crack and a leak. I have not read anything that experiments whether this is effective. It also sounds like "don't wash mushrooms" or "pasta must be cooked in a ton of water" kind of old wives tales.


3

If I think an egg is cracked before I boil it, I make sure to add it to boiling water rather than letting it warm up with the water as it's heating. I give it a quick roll in the water with a spoon to make sure it is heated all round. This cooks the outside of the egg rapidly, sealing the crack immediately. no leakage. When you add a cracked egg to cool ...


3

I agree over-cooking discolors the yolks. Here's a very detailed analysis of boiling eggs: The Food Lab: Perfect Boiled Eggs. With a recipe for perfect boiled eggs based on this analysis. Some interesting, relevant excerpts: The Temperature Timeline of Boiling an Egg Egg yolks, on the other hand, follow a different set of temperatures: At ...


3

If the shell is undamaged, and the eggs are not past their expiration/best by date, they are safe to eat. Official source: your government's food safety agency, unless you live in a place with really really lax food regulation. But your profile says Australia - I'm sure things are fine there. If there are problems with salmonella outbreaks, it's not anything ...


2

Shake the egg like you would a rattle. If the insides move, raw. If the egg feels solid, cooked.


2

Put them in the oven.


2

The Best method I've used is very similar to "Julia's method", just no egg pricking or vinegar. I used this method several days ago on my gas range and it worked perfectly: http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_perfect_hard_boiled_eggs/


2

I always use Julia’s method. Prick the eggs on the rounded end (a tack works well), cover with water, add a splash of vinegar, bring to a boil uncovered, immediately remove from heat and cover, after 17 minutes immerse in an ice water bath for at least 2 minutes. Also, I’ve found that the fresher the egg, the harder it is to peel, I like to use eggs that ...


2

I really like using the egg-perfect egg timer. You boil it with the eggs and it tells you when the egg is finished. It actually tells you whether the egg is soft, medium or hard boiled.


2

In terms of food safety, as long as the egg would have been safe to eat as it is (that is, it still is in its unbroken shell, has been cooled rapidly after cooking and then refrigerated), it is safe to recook. In terms of quality, I am not sure that you will get a very palatable result. You are likely to end up with overcooked and rubbery whites at the ...


2

You can reduce the shelling to a second and literally blow the eggs out of the shells if you add a couple of spoons of baking soda to the water. They should make it through the week. Some say boiled eggs last for a very long time in their shell. Though not sure about the modern washed eggs and would recommend staying within the 5-day thing. Checkout this ...


2

By your definition, I would cook them all at one time. From there you have a couple options. Leave them in the shell and peel when needed. This keeps out a lot of the air which extends the shelf life to 2 weeks, but can dry them out a little making the texture a little harder. Immediately peel and dry them as best as possible. Put them in a Zip Lock ...


1

Salt does permeate the shell and flavor the egg, but not the quantities you're talking about. How do I know? I grew up eating Chinese tea eggs, which are made by soaking a hard boiled egg in a salty solution. They're normally cracked but not peeled before soaking, and are soaked for a number of hours, up to a few days. For a quick boil like this, I'm ...



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