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18

The Wikipedia article on Capsicum reads, citing a FAQ on a page of the ollege of Agriculture and Home Economics of the New Mexico State University: Capsaicin is present in large quantities in the placental tissue (which holds the seeds), the internal membranes and, to a lesser extent, the other fleshy parts of the fruits of plants in the genus Capsicum. ...


15

It definitely sounds like you had some water on whatever you stirred the oil with. When water droplets get in the oil, they sink since oil is lighter than water. Then the water droplets turn to steam because the boiling point of water is much below the boiling point of oil. At this point, the steam rapidly rises out of the oil and escapes with a noise and a ...


14

There is a difference between a full rolling boil and a slow boil, but it's not really what you're suggesting. At a rolling boil, the water is mixing well enough that effectively it's all at 100°C. At a slow boil, it's really only boiling at the bottom, with bubbles floating up from there, so most of the water is actually a bit below 100°C. This difference ...


11

Yes, it's bad for basically everything. Oils, of any variety, will go rancid much faster there. It'll be most obvious for the least stable ones, but they'll all go eventually. And if you've ever accidentally cooked something with rancid oil, you'll know, it's not a pleasant surprise. Anything aromatic will degrade a lot faster too. Even before your olive ...


11

It is impossible to convert Microwaves into Celsius or Fahrenheit. Temperature(Celsius): Temperature is a measure of the average translational kinetic energy of the molecules of a system. Heat is commonly expressed in either of two units: the calorie, an older metric unit, and the British thermal unit (Btu), an English unit commonly used in the United ...


9

Infrared thermometers work very well when measuring the temperature of hot oil. For deep frying it's not a big deal, as standard probe thermometers work fine. But for shallow frying or sauteeing, the IR thermometer does an excellent job at providing the temperature of the oil. (Note that IR thermometers are not accurate when measuring the temperature of a ...


9

Popcorn kernels pop because moisture is trapped inside of a relatively gas-tight shell. As the kernels are heated, the water inside the kernel turns to steam. The shell of the kernel keeps the steam from expanding, so pressure builds up inside of the kernel until the whole things blows open. If the kernel doesn't have enough moisture inside of it or if the ...


7

At a normal atmospheric pressure, even the steam created by boiling will only be 100°C. However, you will have to worry about the food touching the bottom part of the pan, as that can, and will, get hotter than the water. So if what you're boiling is suspended or floating then no, it won't be any different. I figure it's also worth mentioning that if what ...


7

In my experience, the most likely impact of a gentle boil vs. a furious rolling boil is going to be on texture of starchy foods, such as potatoes or other root vegetables, rather than flavor. I've found that a gentle simmer of potatoes will result in a mostly intact shape and consistent texture, whereas an aggressive boil without perfect timing can result ...


7

You should completely cover the metal ring, otherwise you risk burning the element out. You should only boil as much water as you need above this minimum though, to save electricity. Check inside your kettle, they often have minimum and maximum levels marked somehow.


7

This is a very common problem with challah (and any braided bread). As mentioned in comments, it seems likely that the splitting happened in the oven because the bread continued to expand too much after the crust had set. But the braids also complicate the reasons why this may have happened. Here are a few common things to try: Be sure not to braid too ...


6

You should first set fire to your coals. When they are really hot (red/white), but the flam is out, put the meat on top on the grill. Really, you should avoid flames in a barbecue to prepare the meat. The amount of coals isn't that important. Just make sure the ground is well covered. The more coals, the longer you'll have heat. Since you only want to grill ...


6

Charcoal can get to 700 degrees F but in normal use you're more likely to be in the 500F range. In order to get to the higher end of charcoal's abilities there are a couple things you can do: Use natural lump charcoal, not briquettes. Lower the grill grate to within 1" of the hot coals If 1&2 don't get you enough heat, consider using the Alton Brown ...


6

Yes, they work. The reason they work for keeping liquid warm is because the air pocket slows down the transfer of heat from the liquid to the glass to your hand. Air has a lower thermal conductivity than glass does, which means that it slows down the loss of heat from your drink. (The thermal conductivity of air is 0.024 W/m/°C, while the thermal ...


6

The exact number of cutting boards isn't critical, the important piece is minimizing cross contamination. You can use one cutting board safely as long as you're using it in a food-safe order (cut vegetables, then proteins), and follow good sanitation practices (wash & sanitize the board between ingredients). A quick scrub with soap and water and a spritz ...


6

Are you using non-stick cookware? Beware because there is a well-documented medical effect caused by the fumes released when various non-stick components are heated starting at about 300 °F (149 °C) and beyond. Polymer fume fever You should always have something in a non-stick pan when it is over a flame.


5

I have had the same issue when cooking lots of quesadillas, and have found the following combination of techniques to work quite well. The obvious answer has been hit upon already, lower the heat. But I think that's missing an important aspect of the issue. What's happening is most likely that you are turning on the heat and then cooking your first omelet ...


5

So with gravy, you are talking about a scorched taste. Once you smell it, it is probably too late to salvage it. If you want to try, the best course of action is to remove it from the heat (obviously) and carefully ladle off as much of the top of the pan as you can, leaving the scorched part on the bottom. Then taste what you ladled off and see if it is ...


5

Add some coals over the hot ones and/or reduce airflow some other way (many grills have slits or vents to control airflow, play with those, close them partially). Both should reduce heat output (adding coals of course will mean the grill will burn for longer and will eventually heat up again). I'd not throw water or other liquids on it. Only makes a mess ...


5

One thing I've found surprisingly useful is how accurate it is measuring the temperature of microwaved liquids. This can be handy when bringing milk or water to 100 degrees when making yeast breads. The convection of the liquid when heated by microwave means the surface temperature is within a degree or two of the center of the liquid, at least in my ...


5

Cheese have enzymes. Enzymes break quickly and easily at 150F/65 C. 50 Celsius for a short period of time should suffice to melt you cheese without breaking the protein structures. I have committed the same mistake many times. Actually the fist day my in laws where over i tried to impress them with homemade pasta and cheese sauce. My Cheese sauce clumped. ...


5

In a cooking instruction, "low heat" doesn't refer to the temperature the sauce reaches, but the speed at which you heat it up. Many stove rings (hobs) are marked min-2-3-4-med-6-7-8-max. On that scale, a low heat would be 2 or 3. Very low heat would be min or 2. Left on the stove long enough, even at min, your sauce will boil. The key about using low heat ...


5

A copper diffuser plate will help spread the heat more evenly. Is it possible the coils are not all touching the bottom of your pot?


5

425° F is so hot that it will surely burn over-do the outside of a ham before the inside will get warm. However, you can slice the ham then warm it for about 10 minutes. Slicing it will allow the whole slice to get warm, while not over-cooking the outside.


5

Beans in the can are already well cooked--they are essentially pressure cooked as part of the canning process. While only a speculation, it is highly likely that they are now fragile and bringing them to a full boil would mar their appearance--fewer whole beans--from the agitation. There is nothing I am aware of from a safety aspect that would ...


5

There may be different varieties of watermelon that behave differently, so I can't guarantee that this will work for you. The way I've always done it is to only cut up what I'm going to eat. We cut across the watermelon in the shorter direction, starting at one end, producing circles about 1-1.5 inch (2-3 cm) thick. Here's an image of what removing the ...


4

South American style toss salt over the coals. Works well, looks sassy, but makes a big salty mess More practically just use fully combusted cold ashes from previous fires. Gently scatter them over hot coals to reduce airflow and lower temperature for a while. Use a large tin with big holes punched in the lid to makes handling and shaking easy, or just get ...


4

I believe the direct v. indirect distinction originally comes from grilling. There, its essentially a question of do you put the food directly over the heat source (burning charcoal, gas burner, wood longs, etc.) or do you put it on the other side of the grill. Putting it directly over concentrates most of the heat on the bottom side of the food; putting it ...


4

Direct vs. Indirect Heat are terms usually used when referring to American style BBQing or grilling. While the terms can apply to other areas of cooking as well their usefulness makes the most sense in this context. Direct Heat A method of heat transfer in which heat waves radiate from a source (for example, an open burner or grill) and travel directly to ...


4

For a few years between around 2004 and 2007, a number of Korean and Japanese companies started started emphasizing products sweetened with various industrially isolated oligosaccharides, which is the family of sugars that raffinose belongs to. I believe the sources commonly extracted from included soybeans and other beans, based on the information from ...



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