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-2

It's not just the amount of heat. The heat component IS really important, but that funny taste that you only get from chinese takeout fried rice, really has to do with the fire. The smoke from the fire, even completely combusted fire envelopes the wok and the food within it, the food in that wok is absorbing the smoke and that's what imparts that Chinese ...


4

Basically there's a specific chinese style of cooking that requires extremely large amounts of heat to get a specific mix of textures and flavours. By keeping the amount of heat high and constant, food is cooked quickly, and with a certain sort of flavour - referred to somewhat poetically as "wok hei" Its fairly specific to chinese cooking, and something ...


9

It's an issue of thermodynamics. When you're cooking food, the food cools itself off through evaporative cooling and the energy being used to cause chemical changes in the food (eg, caramelizing sugars). If you have too much food in the pan, the balance is overwhelmed by evaporative cooling, and thus you can only get to the boiling point of water. To ...


0

A recipe that says "70 seconds on high in a 950 Watt microwave" wants exactly that: put it in a 950W microwave for 70 seconds, at full power setting. The recipe author already worried about how hot or done the food is supposed to get from these settings; if you adjust the recipe (including doubling or halving), or use a weaker or stronger microwave, you have ...



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