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17

Having taken a look around some recipe sites and taken the intersection of what most of them consider the "core" spices (and leaving out the ones that showed up on too many 'variations' lists), it looks like the canonical ones are: basil marjoram oregano rosemary thyme


17

If you're going to store anything leafy in a plastic bag, I wrap it first in a paper towel, then in the plastic bag, so none of the leaves touch the bag. This prevents the issue where the outer leaves turn to goo. (I'm not sure what the actual biological issue is ... moisture/condensation? poor respiration?) Don't wash it before storage, as the extra ...


17

Coriander leaf/cilantro looks VERY similar to flat leaf parsley. When I have both at the house I sometimes resort to smelling them to know which is which. Cilantro is very strong smelling, and you'd definitely change the flavor of the dish if you left it out. Flat leaf parsley is significantly more subtle and has a much milder flavor and scent. It is not ...


16

Yes, it is different. Does it matter? It depends. If you're going to use garlic in a stew or anything else that would 'dissolve' the regular garlic anyway, it doesn't really matter all that much in my opinion. If you want to preserve the texture and/or create a more 'urgent' garlic flavour in short-cooked food, I'd go with fresh. Sidenote: most of the ...


16

A nice thing to do is simply give them away. Last year someone dropped of a big pile of small branches of bay leaves at our child's school, with a "free" sign. You could do something similiar, maybe using your community email list or whatever depending on your personal circumstances. You may have many neighbors who have never experienced how amazing fresh ...


15

Personally I think the best way to store fresh herbs is to use a small herb garden. I just planted one and found it very useful for things like thyme, rosemary, and parsley. If you don't have room for a small herb garden then a plastic bag in the fridge is usually the next best thing. Update: Cool link on popular mechanics on growing a garden in 5 gallon ...


15

Flat-leaf (also called Italian Parsley) and curly parsley can be used interchangeably but most chefs prefer flat leaf as it usually has a more distinct taste. That is going to be up to you and your preference. Curly parsley provides a more unique and visually interesting look when you're talking about garnishes but putting a sprig of parsley on a plate ...


15

One of the most popular things I've seen sage used for is tea. You just dry the leaves, steep as you would regular tea leaves (personally I like it with ginger root if I have some handy), and then maybe a little honey or lemon. Sage is anti-bacterial, which is a nice bonus. Meat-wise, I like to use sage with pork chops, either as part of a marinade or ...


14

First, a couple of notes on cooking with lavender: -The leaves as well as the flower blossoms are edible. -If you don't grow it yourself, make sure that you only use lavender that has been produced for culinary usage (often found in bulk form at health food stores). If it isn't sold in a food store, don't use it (such as that in craft stores). -A little ...


13

I've found it freezes quite well — I simply wash it, chop it roughly, and then freeze it in a small plastic bag.


13

dry them and sell them at your local market


13

I agree that there is no true substitute, but if I were going to try, I'd use the zest of 1 lime for every 2 kaffir lime leaves. I wouldn't do the bay leaf or lemon thyme suggested above.


12

Dry rubs are one case that I can think of where dry is specifically necessary, so you can grind them up properly. The main advantage to dry herbs is that they're available year round. When you're dealing with winter dishes, dry herbs would've been the norm to have used at that time. If you are going to substitute, you'll need to add more (typically about ...


12

I wouldn't attempt to substitute. I've read somewhere that you can use regular lime leaves, but I've never seen those anywhere. Even Googling for lime leaf turns up kaffir lime leaves. They can be found easily enough online: ImportFood.com. They freeze well for months in just a zip-lock bag. The flavor profile is best described as a bright floral aromatic. ...


10

Well, it depends on what you're cooking... Here's what I'd suggest as the basics All around / Fresh: Garlic Onion (white) Thyme Basil (in season) Flat Parsley All around / Dried and other: Rosemary Greek Oregano Kosher Salt Whole Black Pepper Flaked Red Pepper This is a pretty versatile list for American and European cooking and I wouldn't be ...


10

Use it to make pesto, super easy and you can use the pesto when ever you need cilantro flavor in a dish. You just need a food processor or even a blender, place the herbs inside and blend while slowly pouring oil into the mix. I normally make mine two handfuls of herbs to a cup and half of oil but you might need to play with the ratio to get a mix that ...


10

Make a sage and lemon butter for putting on steaks and other meats. Blanch the sage leaves for 20 seconds, chop them finely and mix them into some butter along with some lemon zest. Roll into a sausage shape in some cling-film and freeze. Now whenever you have a steak, or a pork chop, or anything else you think a sagey, lemony butter would suit, remove it ...


10

Macerate them in Everclear or midrange vodka for a week or so, then add sweetener and dilute to ~40% ABV. This makes a decent digestif, similar in spirit (no pun intended) to Chartreuse. Or mix in a small amount of fresh thyme, lemon balm, lemon verbena, etc, to make it a little more Provencale. We picked up a bottle of 'Laurus 48' while in Italy a few ...


10

Volume measurements of herbs are hopelessly imprecise to begin with; what you actually measure as 1/4 cup depends entirely on how tightly you pack them, how wet the leaves are, even the size/shape of your measuring cup or spoon. When given a measurement like that, you should always treat it as a rough guideline; don't worry about being exact, it's not ...


10

Nutmeg works in lots of places you might not expect, and it's a really popular addition to cream/bechamel sauces like you'd find on creamed spinach. Other things that are classic with spinach: Garlic Hot pepper flakes Lemon/vinegar


10

You need enough liquid in the blender for it to work; if the leaves get stuck in blender canister, they won't reach the blades to get ground up. It's mostly an issue of width of the container relative to the size of the basil leaves. I typically make my pesto in a blender rather than a food processor, but I do the following: Pack a few inches of basil ...


10

Last summer was a long time ago. The National Center for Food Preservation has this to say about herbs in oil: Oils may be flavored with herbs if they are made up for fresh use, stored in the refrigerator and used within 2 to 3 days. There are no canning recommendations. ... Pesto is an uncooked seasoning mixture of herbs, usually including fresh basil, ...


9

Basil: Make sure the leaves are dry! Use a papertowel to dry them off. Then, trim the end of each stem, and put the basil in a glass of water. Avoid having any leaves below the waterline. Change the water regularly. Keep it at room temperature. Parsley and Cilantro: Same instructions except refrigerate with a baggie loosely over the herbs. Be sure they're ...


9

Anything Thai. There's a particularly fun Thai green curry that you make with fresh Cilantro (though I daresay we call it coriander over here), lots of garlic, some hot green peppers, and about 6 different spices. I don't have the recipe on hand, but Google is your friend. If you're making this, add the flesh of a fresh mango, it's incredible. Anything ...


9

The texture of frozen herbs is going to be totally different after thawing. In my opinion frozen herbs are fine for using in cooking, but they don't work well as a garnish or as an addition to a dish at the end of cooking. The taste is definitely better than dried, though.


9

I assume you're speaking of using fennel fronds, specifically. The fronds look a bit like dill, and are often used as a garnish, but certainly taste different than dill. I think the main reason is that most people usually only get fennel fronds when they also buy a fennel bulb, so it's usually inconvenient to only use the fronds for a garnish when you're ...


8

I think the main reason pre-prepared garlic exists is that some people don't like working with raw garlic directly i.e. getting their fingers/hands smelly. You can't go wrong with raw garlic and it's easy to keep and prepare.


8

forgive my poor English (I am Italian and live in Italy) while trying to give you my answer. I cannot +1 Peter V because of my poor reputation, but he is right: in Italian cooking you don’t go for mix, what you look for is the balance between a few ingredients, normally one from different kind of foods: one cereal, one veg, one spice for example. The main ...


8

It's not mentioned as a substitute for dill because it tastes nothing like dill. You'll find that chefs don't generally choose substitute herbs based on how much they look like the original but on comparable flavor, so though fennel fronds look like dill, that's about the end of their comparability. I agree that it might be tasty in some applications where ...


8

Dry herbs are slower to release their flavors than fresh herbs; they will need extra cooking time to impart their full flavors, so add them to the dish sooner. Since they are less delicate and need the moisture, you may also want to add them along with a liquid, to help extract out the flavors. Crushing the larger-leaf herbs up a bit may also help. Use less ...



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