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16

If you're going to store anything leafy in a plastic bag, I wrap it first in a paper towel, then in the plastic bag, so none of the leaves touch the bag. This prevents the issue where the outer leaves turn to goo. (I'm not sure what the actual biological issue is ... moisture/condensation? poor respiration?) Don't wash it before storage, as the extra ...


16

Yes, it is different. Does it matter? It depends. If you're going to use garlic in a stew or anything else that would 'dissolve' the regular garlic anyway, it doesn't really matter all that much in my opinion. If you want to preserve the texture and/or create a more 'urgent' garlic flavour in short-cooked food, I'd go with fresh. Sidenote: most of the ...


16

Coriander leaf/cilantro looks VERY similar to flat leaf parsley. When I have both at the house I sometimes resort to smelling them to know which is which. Cilantro is very strong smelling, and you'd definitely change the flavor of the dish if you left it out. Flat leaf parsley is significantly more subtle and has a much milder flavor and scent. It is not ...


15

Flat-leaf (also called Italian Parsley) and curly parsley can be used interchangeably but most chefs prefer flat leaf as it usually has a more distinct taste. That is going to be up to you and your preference. Curly parsley provides a more unique and visually interesting look when you're talking about garnishes but putting a sprig of parsley on a plate ...


15

Having taken a look around some recipe sites and taken the intersection of what most of them consider the "core" spices (and leaving out the ones that showed up on too many 'variations' lists), it looks like the canonical ones are: basil marjoram oregano rosemary thyme


13

Personally I think the best way to store fresh herbs is to use a small herb garden. I just planted one and found it very useful for things like thyme, rosemary, and parsley. If you don't have room for a small herb garden then a plastic bag in the fridge is usually the next best thing. Update: Cool link on popular mechanics on growing a garden in 5 gallon ...


12

Dry rubs are one case that I can think of where dry is specifically necessary, so you can grind them up properly. The main advantage to dry herbs is that they're available year round. When you're dealing with winter dishes, dry herbs would've been the norm to have used at that time. If you are going to substitute, you'll need to add more (typically about ...


12

I wouldn't attempt to substitute. I've read somewhere that you can use regular lime leaves, but I've never seen those anywhere. Even Googling for lime leaf turns up kaffir lime leaves. They can be found easily enough online: ImportFood.com. They freeze well for months in just a zip-lock bag. The flavor profile is best described as a bright floral aromatic. ...


10

Volume measurements of herbs are hopelessly imprecise to begin with; what you actually measure as 1/4 cup depends entirely on how tightly you pack them, how wet the leaves are, even the size/shape of your measuring cup or spoon. When given a measurement like that, you should always treat it as a rough guideline; don't worry about being exact, it's not ...


10

You need enough liquid in the blender for it to work; if the leaves get stuck in blender canister, they won't reach the blades to get ground up. It's mostly an issue of width of the container relative to the size of the basil leaves. I typically make my pesto in a blender rather than a food processor, but I do the following: Pack a few inches of basil ...


10

Last summer was a long time ago. The National Center for Food Preservation has this to say about herbs in oil: Oils may be flavored with herbs if they are made up for fresh use, stored in the refrigerator and used within 2 to 3 days. There are no canning recommendations. ... Pesto is an uncooked seasoning mixture of herbs, usually including fresh basil, ...


8

Basil: Make sure the leaves are dry! Use a papertowel to dry them off. Then, trim the end of each stem, and put the basil in a glass of water. Avoid having any leaves below the waterline. Change the water regularly. Keep it at room temperature. Parsley and Cilantro: Same instructions except refrigerate with a baggie loosely over the herbs. Be sure they're ...


8

I assume you're speaking of using fennel fronds, specifically. The fronds look a bit like dill, and are often used as a garnish, but certainly taste different than dill. I think the main reason is that most people usually only get fennel fronds when they also buy a fennel bulb, so it's usually inconvenient to only use the fronds for a garnish when you're ...


8

Dry herbs are slower to release their flavors than fresh herbs; they will need extra cooking time to impart their full flavors, so add them to the dish sooner. Since they are less delicate and need the moisture, you may also want to add them along with a liquid, to help extract out the flavors. Crushing the larger-leaf herbs up a bit may also help. Use less ...


7

the Serious Eats blog had an article about asafoetida recently -- it also goes by the name "hing" (not sure if you ran across that in your googling). the article is interesting (so are the comments), and offers some ways to use it: http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/06/spice-hunting-asafoetida-hing.html


7

Tarragon, basil, oregano, thyme, savory, and sage are the ones that I'm most inclined to use in their dried form. Generally the more resinous and strongly scented they are fresh, the better they'll be in dry form. Rosemary will hold its flavor dry but unless you're going to grind the dry product it's like eating pine needles. I prefer fresh rosemary ...


7

If you're adding inordinate amounts of herbs with no effect, then that sounds to me like a problem with the herbs themselves. If you're using dried herbs, they could just be too old. To me, dried basil and oregano and marjoram just never taste like much. Fresh, however, they're quite strong. Tarragon, chervil, and dill, on the other hand, do "work" in ...


7

Certain herbs are very mild when fresh and do not develop their full smell and flavour until dried; e.g. bayleaf, oregano. Fresh herbs generally have short storage times. When substituting you typically need to add much more of the herb, as drying shrinks it concentrating the flavour.


7

Marjoram is a type of Oregano, or rather it is from the Origanum family (origanum majorana, oregano is origanum vulgare). So oregano makes the closest substitute I find, though it is stronger, so use less, oregano is often called wild marjoram.


7

By grinding it, you are also increasing the surface are of the herb when it reaches the tongue, and you are exposing the raw/inner (bitter) flavors of the herb to the mouth. When cooking with it "un-ground", the cooking process extracts just the oils from the herb, and leaves the leaf in tact which does not taste unpleasant to the senses. I would certainly ...


6

forgive my poor English (I am Italian and live in Italy) while trying to give you my answer. I cannot +1 Peter V because of my poor reputation, but he is right: in Italian cooking you don’t go for mix, what you look for is the balance between a few ingredients, normally one from different kind of foods: one cereal, one veg, one spice for example. The main ...


6

I think fresh garlic is much more flavorful! I tried the jarred garlic before, and I could definitely taste a difference. Yes, it's more convenient, but it's not as strong as fresh. A hand grater is useful when using fresh garlic. You won't have to chop and it helps prevent biting into larger pieces.


6

It is just the root of the coriander plant. Certainly at least here (UK) you can buy living coriander plants in the supermarket; you could pull one out of the pot and use the root from that. Apparently you can also subsitute 2 stems of coriander for every piece of root called for in the recipe, but I've never tried this.


6

Well I would suggest if you really can not get it, then leave it out altogether. It provides accents of flavour rather than a primary usually in most curry recipes, so it can be omitted. If you want to substitute it, then you can use lemon or lime zest, possibly with some mint leaves to freshen it a little. But the end result will not be the same, just ...


6

Sometimes the outer leaves are a bit leathery (especially if the quality isn’t too god). When that’s the case I remove them first. Next, I remove the green stalks – but Jefromi is right, the tiny leaves are delicious. The kernel in the middle near the base of the fennel bulb is very hard. I usually cut it out by halving the bulb along its length and making ...


6

Grow them! It's easy, cheap and they'll always be available. NOthing you'll ever grow will give so much back for so little input. Many herbs - especially rosemary, sage and thyme - are woody perennials and once established in a sunny corner of your garden, they will grow and spread and you'll have them all year round, if your winters aren't too harsh. ...


6

Kaffir Lime Leaves are using in Thai and Indian cooking in two ways: They may be added whole to a recipe (such as a soup) and behave like bay leaves; diners take them out and don't eat them. They can be ground fine as part of a spice paste and make the flavoring base for the recipe. There are a few recipes which use slivered kaffir lime leaves, but they ...


6

Adding herbs directly to baked goods usually results in very strong flavours. Infusing the sugar with the herbs gives a more subtle overtone rather than a full-on explosion. In some cases, of course, you might want a strong herb flavour, but where you just want a hint, infusing the sugar is great. The classic example is using stripped vanilla pods to make ...


6

I've never seen canned pesto, nor do I know if there is a way to do it safely. I will propose an alternate solution. Have you thought about freezing it? I've had pesto given to me as a gift before, but it was made as normal then frozen in a canning jar. It worked great. Did some more digging and eventually came across this, from the National Center for Home ...


5

In the USA, Coriander is referred to Cilantro, when used in context of herb/green. Possible sources (to purchase Cilantro aka Coriander with root): vendors at some farmer's markets (this is where I get mine) "South East Asian" or "Latin American" grocery stores "Indian" Grocery stores



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