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What we called "stinging nettles" were the bane of my childhood in northern Florida, but they aren't nettles of the urtica genus. They are actually Cnidoscolus stimulosus, or bullnettle, which unlike true nettles does not have edible leaves, but the small tuberous roots can be eaten cooked like potatoes. Urtica chamaedryoides, Urtica urens, and Urtica ...


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The US has lots and lots of nettles. From Wiki: Nettle is part of the English name of many plants with stinging hairs, particularly those of the genus Urtica. It is also part of the name of plants which resemble Urtica species in appearance but do not have stinging hairs. Plants called "nettle" include: ball nettle – Solanum carolinense bull nettle ...


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We use marjoram, oregano, basil, thyme and bay leaf in Italian. If you can't have fresh then perhaps roast the dry seasonings together in a hot cast iron skillet, dry.


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The scientific reason? Not without seeing your specimen. (wink, wink) Seriously, unlike cut flowers and other herbs like sage or rosemary, parsley is simply not happy in water for more than a couple of days, especially towards the end of the growing season and/or if it had been harvested some time ago. Nothing to do with the water, although that should be ...


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Here is a handy chart that I have come to love and use! If they are off tasting to you or odd or too strong go lighter :D http://www.marthastewart.com/270213/ratio-of-fresh-herbs-to-dry-herbs



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