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2

The aromatics diminish. I've tried this, with hyssop - because I have a bunch of bulk spices. I've found that an airtight jar in a dark/cool cabinet is best, even for an extended period (my jar on the shelf is over a year now). The hyssop I get is from Jordan. I also receive sumac and the blend zaatar.


3

In my experience, the answer for most leafy herbs is yes, fragance and flavor is preserved. Never tryed hyssop, however Gardening Know How site says it freezes fine: it can be dried or frozen and stored for later use. When harvesting a hyssop plant, cut it in the morning hours once any dew has dried. Hang the plants upside down in small bunches to dry ...


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I have a large bouquet of fresh sage drying in my kitchen window, with the intended use of drying, pulsing the dried leaves in the food processor and bottling in a couple of weeks. A favourite recipe with my family (and friends, for that matter) is for Sage and Asiago Scalloped Potatoes. It is a rich but mouth-watering dish redolent of fragrant sage, onion ...


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if u think , your spices are getting moist and losing aroma or getting spoilt, u can slightly roast them for a minute on low flame and put them back into dry containers. This way spices will last long. and regarding Herbs I am clueless.


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Moscafj's answer is technically true, but I don't think that you will have any problems with your containers. Exposing your spices to drafts, convection and change in humidity is a bad idea, it will make them lose their aroma quicker. This is why they say "airtight container" - so you don't keep them in an open jar. But if you have pinhole-sized holes in ...


1

Every edible ingredient we use in cooking has an expiry date! It is an inevitable nature which is good and important for healthy, safety and taste. So we will encourage ourselves to store for a short period of time and eat fresh food. As @moscafj pointed out, "quicker cycling through spice inventory" is a better choice. Following are what you need ...


2

The flavor and aroma of spices deteriorates over time, particularly when exposed to air and light. How much time? ...hard to say...but buying whole spices and grinding them yourself when needed lengthens shelf life...as does storing them in airtight containers and in a dark, cool place. Health and safety is not a concern here. Flavor and aroma is. We are ...


1

It depends on what you mean by "tomato based mint sauce." The tomato sauce that is one of the classical French mother sauces contains ingredients that probably don't pair well with mint (bay, thyme, and pork come to mind). I assume that you intend your "sauce" to be more of a simple Italian tomato sauce or perhaps a salsa? I would definitely recommend ...


4

Mint likes oil. And it likes water. And it likes alcohol. Like most complex flavors, mint is complicated. The greener, vegetal notes are going to be from compounds like chlorophyll, and will be alcohol and very weakly water soluble. The astringent, sharper notes are going to from compounds like menthol, which are oil soluble. In general, the faster ...


1

Depends on what you are planning to serve the sauce with, you could consider a mint jelly which is mildly sweetened and would not overwhelm the tomato flavor , it would save you from sweetening the tomatoe sauce. If you don't have that particular item right now , go with mint leaves directly into the sauce when it starts to simmer, leave it there for a ...


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I would cook the sauce and toss in the mint at the last minute, right before you use the sauce. I don't think you want to heat/cook the mint, as it might result in too much of a vegetal note. Of course, more mint and/or more surface area (chopped) would produce more flavor...depends on your use of the sauce.



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