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Usually this question goes the other way around (how to adjust recipes for high-altitude cooking)... The main effect that altitude has on cooking times and temperatures is how it affects the boiling point of water. At higher altitudes, water begins boiling at a lower temperature, so anything boiling will not reach as high of a temperature, and often needs ...


5

Sugar fermentation occurs more quickly at high altitude so you need to cut back on the time that you're allowing the dough to rise. Salt controls the action of the yeast so you might be able to increase it slightly since you're talking about pizza crust and not a sweet yeast dough. Are you using all-purpose flour? If so, try bread flour. The higher ...


4

There is a fairly detailed answer to this available here. It appears that the answer depends a little on the type of cookie. If you have a cookie that has a great deal of air in it you'll have the same problem as cakes do. If you are working with a very dense cookie that can't really fall (since there isn't anywhere to go). At that point you're just down ...


3

The air pressure is lower at higher altitudes; when you add extra flour to your baked goods, it prevents them from rising too quickly or too much. ETA (about the water): Water boils at a lower temperature at higher altitudes, so the extra water called for in high-altitude baking is to compensate for all the water turning to steam faster than it would at ...


3

Mary, Everything I see online does indicate that souffles can be problematic at altitude, so you're right to seek advice. Here's two resources for help: Cooking At High Altitude Blog: http://cookingathighaltitude.blogspot.com/2008/11/chocolate-souffle.html Pie in the Sky Cookbook: http://www.powells.com/biblio/62-9780060522582-0


3

It really depends on the length of time recommended. Due to the usual long length (>4 hours) of slow-cooker recipe cook times most elevation differences would be negligible. However if a recipe calls for a cook time of less than 4 hours you may see some foods not cooking as usual. Legumes might especially be sensitive to this as they take a very long time to ...


2

While trying to find other resources for you question (looking at the effect of elevation on pilot lights in furnaces, hot water heaters, etc) it was mentioned that elevation does in fact play a role in the pressure of the gas being ignited and could theoretically create a problem. In most responses though, there was debate about whether the theoretical ...


2

I don't think that reducing the yeast is going to help much. Remember that the yeast is going to reproduce in your dough anyway. Try rising in a cooler location, even the refrigerator. It'll make your bread better anyway. Start with ice-cold water when you prepare the dough, and then keep it cold overnight. After that, bring it out to room temperature in ...


1

The first adjustment you can make for altitude is to cook something to a desired internal temperature rather than just "time and temperature". Your pot roast is done at an internal temperature of 160°F regardless of your altitude. Following is a chart of temperatures you can use as a baseline: Internal temperatures for various meats. Always use a meat ...


1

I would look at recipes which do give a high-altitude version, such as the Toll House recipe on the chocolate chips bag, and make proportional reductions / changes to the recipe you have that doesn't give a high-altitude version. e.g. if Toll House increases flour from 2 1/4 c to 2 1/2 cups, I would multiply the flour in your recipe by 1.111 (10/9)



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