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33

Honey is entirely useable after crystallization. This is a natural and spontaneous process and doesn't affect the honey negatively in terms of flavor or quality. It's dependent upon the sugar content of the particular honey, and in particular the crystallization speed is determined by: the nectar source collected by bees (the sugar composition of honey), ...


17

There is apparently evidence that some of the flavour compounds in honey deteriorate during heating: http://www.ibra.org.uk/articles/Effect-of-heat-on-honey The text suggests that honey should not be heated to more than 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit). So it might be wise to let the tea cool down a bit before adding the honey. Having said that, ...


17

It is honeydew honey. It is not made from nectar, but from tree parasite secretions. It has a quite different taste from regular flower/nectar honey, and it is much darker. Sometimes it is also called forest honey. Wikipedia has a paragraph on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey#Honeydew_honey There is a slim possibility that it is not a real honey at ...


16

Honey is not vegan. In short, the core tenet of veganism is living without exploiting anything in the animal kingdom, and most (if not all) vegans consider taking honey from bees a form of exploitation.


14

Honey contains lots of aromatic compounds, which are quite big, fragile molecules. This is one of the reasons why cold centrifuged honey costs more. When you decrystalize honey by heating it, many of these aromatic molecules break up, and you lose the complexity of the aromas. So yes, it is bad for the honey. Also, it may reduce its health benefits, as ...


14

Generally speaking, maple syrup will work fine in any recipe that calls for honey. They may have slightly different viscosities and water content, but that could be true between two honeys as well, so I wouldn't worry about it a lot. The only thing I think you really have to consider is whether the flavor of maple syrup is appealing in the dish you would ...


14

Here are a few possibilities: Make a salt barrier around the jar. Stand the jar in a bowl of water. Use an air-tight container (doesn't have to be a jar). Any of the above should keep the ants out of your honey.


13

You can use agave nectar instead of honey or sugar if you modify your recipe a bit by lowering the amount of liquids. Agave nectar has more water than honey and is sweeter than honey (about 50% sweeter). Honey Fructose: 41%, Glucose: 36%, Water: 18% Agave nectar Fructose: 53%, Glucose: 15%, Water: 25% As a starting point in modifying the recipe, keep ...


13

Forever. Honey, comb present or otherwise, does not go bad. It even acts as a preservative. The date you are seeing is solely referring to the "quality" degradation. Completely edible honey has been found in 3,000 year old Egyptian tombs.


12

I'm just a humble beekeeper. I went about my business doing what I do, ignorant of other ways or ideas. I sell my honey at a local food co-op, being the only local beekeeper who can meet their demand. I did a taste-tasting event one day where I got to interact with those who buy honey. WOW! What an eye opening experience. There were folks who would not ...


11

Honey is very stable for a number of reasons. The main ones though are the low amount of water (most honey is under 18% water) and the high amount of sugar (which is a preservative). Both of these things keep things like mold and bacteria from being able to grow. Over a long period of time (and if left unsealed) the honey could absorb moisture and then ...


11

Crystals breed crystals, so once a sugary substance starts to crystallize, it will seem to crystallize very rapidly. Gently warm it in a water bath or the microwave and the crystals will dissolve. This is very common with "raw" honey, but it happens with processed honey as well. It's normal.


9

Honey should be stored at 50-70 Degrees Fahrenheit Honey is similar in to olive oil and should be storaged between 50-70 Degrees Fahrenheit according to Max Shrem from Slashfood: Similar to olive oil, honey should be stored at a cool temperature between 50 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. So, it's best to store it away from your oven or stove. Also, it ...


8

Yes you can use 3/4 cup (180 ml) of light/dark corn syrup: You can use any of the following substitutions: 1 cup of honey 3/4 cup (180 ml) maple syrup plus 1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated white sugar 3/4 cup (180 ml) light or dark corn syrup plus 1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated white sugar 3/4 cup (180 ml) light molasses plus 1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated ...


8

Bees add enzymes to honey that prevent crystallization. These enzymes are destroyed by many of the processing techniques, like heating, but such techniques also physically destroy the comb, so they're not used on the honey that is in the comb. This type of honey is also called raw honey sometimes. As a side note, crystallized honey is fine for ...


8

The comb, which is beeswax, holds the honey. Honeycomb is used for decorative desserts, placed on or along side nicely arranged fruit, is used as a spread on toast or bread or crackers and is served with cheese platters. As a child I loved honeycomb, would pop a hunk in my mouth and chew like gum until all that was left was the wax, and either spit the wax ...


8

If you're trying to avoid char, then switching to honey or any sugar is probably in the wrong direction. Sugar burns...quick. I'd recommend three things overall specific to this crust: Use less oil. If your oil is dripping off in buckets and causing significant fires - you've got too much. Just try a light brushing on the meat. Use a different oil. ...


7

Keep it stored in an airtight container, so that it doesn't absorb moisture from the air. If it congeals, put the container in hot water until honey is liquid (~10-15 minutes).


7

If you do use maple syrup, be sure to use 100% pure maple syrup. Any imitation or partial syrup will have a significantly different viscosity and a much, much higher water content and you're not going to get the results you want. The first 3 ingredients in Aunt Jemima Original are: corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, water, which is going to be pretty ...


7

If the honey has always had a water content below ~18% and is continuously stored in a sealed container (for instance a glass jar), it is perfectly safe to eat as long as you are over 1 year old. In fact, pasteurized honey is inferior in quality. The pollen and spores will remain in there either way, even if they're dead and can only be removed by ...


6

You can neutralize the acidity of your drink by adding a half teaspoon of baking soda, but don't do this. Apart from fizzing up like a volcano, your lemon drink, or what is left of it, will taste pretty awful. What you want to do is reduce the perceived acidity. This can be done simply by adding more honey. I suggest adding a teaspoon at a time until it ...


6

There is no single well-defined idea of "degradation" of honey. I guess there will be some temperature above which it stops being honey, but that be a charring temperature somewhere above 200 celsius. This doesn't mean that honey stays the same all the time. It is very complex, and some compounds can certainly get destroyed when heated. Some are even ...


5

I also notice it myself, and it varies depending on the flowers and region. I read that there is a bitter honey from Sardinia, Miele Amaro.


5

Crystallized honey is harmless. It is the natural precipitation of glucose out of the supersaturated solution. As shown in the first link, and recommended here, if you don't wish to use crystalline honey then you simply heat it. The ideal storage temperature for honey is below 50 F (10 C). Temperatures between 50-70 F (10-21 C) will encourage ...


5

Yes, you can substitute molasses for honey. They're going to function essentially the same measure for measure since they are both syrups. Keep in mind however there will be a difference in flavor (not necessarily bad, just different...which would be the case for one honey over another...different tastes).


5

I'm vegan, and don't eat honey, but I think it very much depends on why you went vegan. If it's for health then I don't think it makes a difference. If you want to get into a moral argument you can make the case that it's closer to using wool than using milk... (I don't make the argument, but I respect that people can) but the choice is yours - it was a ...


5

When I was a child, we used to keep honey (taken from our own bees, and not pasteurized or whipped or whatever) in the root cellar, where it was dark, and cool but not cold. This was a situation where some of it would be kept for years. Sometimes when honey gets cold it crystallizes, which is really no big deal - just sit the closed jar in warm water from ...


5

Yes, crystalized honey can be saved with a combination of heat and water. The trick is using low concentrations of both. Your honey has solidified because over time the moisture has escaped and the sugars have formed crystals. Add a tiny amount of water and break up the large crystals if possible to speed the process of dissolving the sugars back into ...


4

Yes. You can also substitute 1 cup molasses with 3/4 cup packed brown sugar + 1/4 water, or 1 cup pure maple syrup, or 1 cup dark corn syrup.


4

If your honey is in a glass jar, you can also just remove the lid and put it in the microwave for 20 - 30 seconds or so. All you're trying to do is heat it up so it goes back to liquid form. (But don't microwave it in plastic! Yuck!) I've never found a way to keep raw honey from crystallizing in the first place, though.



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