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12

Butterflying a hot dog (or any similar sausage) has two effects. First, as the moisture inside the hot dog expands during cooking, causing the casings to frequently burst due to the pressure that builds up. When you butterfly a hot dog the this is prevented. Such blistering does not 'harm' the hot dog but are somewhat 'unsightly', so I would call this an ...


8

Steaming them will soften them up for your dogs. The quick-and-easy way to do that would be to microwave (as another user suggested), or just over a pot of water briefly until they're soft enough


7

You could try microwaving the buns. Microwaves tend to make things, especially bread-like things, soggy and soft, which normally is not great, but in this case might be helpful. Another option might be to put some warm water underneath them in the toaster oven. I'm not sure how logistically feasible this is, but in theory it could help to soften up the ...


7

It really comes down to taste. In this usage, you're treating sauerkraut like a condiment so there's not really a "correct" answer.. A lot of hot dog places have traditions - for instance, Nathan's Famous hot dogs (the original "Coney Island" hot dog) uses these combinations with kraut: -Sauerkraut, spicey brown mustard (New York style) -Thousand island ...


5

Butterflying also exposes a greater area of the surface to the grill's direct heat, leading to browning and smoky flavor.


4

I did not try it myself, but if you have an apple-core remover, you can make a hole in the bun and put the sausage in through the hole. If your sausage is too big, it could be a mess, maybe 'stab' several times then. Good luck!


3

As a work-around you could cut a V-shape in it to fit the hot dog in.


2

Now you made the edit, it is clearer to me what you ask. Here the answers to your two questions: 2) They don't need any agents. Protein acts as a glue when heated. Protein is almost the only food type which will actually "glue" things together - try making gluten-free pancakes with non-protein flour like almond flour and you will notice what I mean. (You ...


2

You can make them ahead of time, you can partially fry them after dipping them in the batter and frying them until they are a light golden color (enough the batter wont stick to each other). As you complete them, put them in the freezer and when ready just pop them in the hot oil (defrosted of course.) This will not only let you get them ready to go ahead of ...


2

If you want the hardcore, traditional pretzel flavor and crust, lye is really the only way to get it. You can dip it in a boiling bath of baking soda or washing soda for a minute or so. This can have the downside of giving the bun a really thick, leathery crust like a bagel. Alternately, to do a lye dip, you add one ounce of lye to one liter of water (add ...


1

You could get a better crust on the pretzels if you used baked soda instead of baking soda and it's still safer than playing with lye. As for the wash... egg whites aren't going to give you much flavor. Did you try a regular egg wash? It will give the best color and shine. For flavor, though, you could try clarified butter or some sort of oil. You could mix ...


1

I believe what you are looking for is Chow-chow. There are many variations but the basic seasoning are generally the same. There are recipes all over the web.


1

Hot dogs are a an example indigenous to North America of a class of sausages called emulsified sausages. The meat and fat are ground so finely that they emulsify together into a smooth paste. Other sausages of this type include German Frankfurter W├╝rstchen (of which the hot dog is a descendant) and Italian Mortadella (which is also the pre-cursor of the ...


1

klypos, From what I recall (!), the filling of a meat hot dog sausage is typically soft, moist, homogeneous and without a particularly strong flavour, at least compared to other sausages. Rather bland-tasting, to some. The Tesco brand sausages to which you refer is based on soy and wheat proteins ...


1

Some people slice hot dogs lengthwise in an effort to make them a little safer for children. Hot dogs are a choking hazard for kids, so the idea is to make the pieces in each bite smaller and easier to chew. I don't know of any research that demonstrates that slicing lengthwise is effective, but since pediatricians recommend cutting hot dogs into small ...


1

put your bun in microwave no more than 20 seconds , then remove from microwave and pierce one end with a sharpening steel pushing straight through bun . insert hotdog gently , there u have it neat tidy and so easy .



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