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32

Yes, actually, there are two magic ingredients: Guar gum and Xanthan gum. Guar gum is a thickener, but in small quantities can also prevent the growth of ice crystals which would cause the ice cream to harden into icicles. Xanthan gum is a stabilizer which helps keep air (called overrun) in the mixture. Air is generally churned into ice cream by ice cream ...


27

The magical ingredients for commercial ice cream are stabilizers, emulsifiers, and really good freezers. As Aaronut notes, stabilizers can go a long way... Personally, watching a bowl of ice cream melt without losing its shape makes me a bit uncomfortable, so... use in moderation. But if you don't happen to have any gum available, here are a few suggestions ...


19

There are two main base recipes for ice cream. French style ice cream contains egg yolks, which help make it soft, rich, smooth, creamy, custardy. Philadelphia style ice cream (sometimes called American style) has no eggs, and relies on the fat in the cream to keep it soft, but will still never be as rich and smooth as French style, and will still tend to ...


17

More fat! Your recipe has two dairy components (half and half and whipping cream). The half and half is half cream, half milk. To increase the fat, experiment with using more cream and less half and half.


16

First of all, the names vary a bit from country to country, or the ingredients do. I'll explain the most common names/ingredients. The main difference is in the ingredients used. Sorbet is basically water + sugar + fruit, while ice cream and gelato is milk/cream + sugar + fruit. So the last two are more 'creamy', while sorbet is more 'icy'. You can say ...


14

Is the liquid inside the handle? Some ice-cream-scoops are hollow and have a liquid on the inside to help heat conduction - this helps melt the ice-cream and prevent it from freezing to the scoop. Here's an example: http://www.amazon.com/Zeroll-1020-Original-Cream-Scoop/dp/B0002U34EW/ref=sr_1_11?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1407359424&sr=1-11 Note ...


13

If the ice cream mix is setting up but tending to leave a buttery coating in your mouth the best thing would be to try cutting back on the cream and replacing it with whole milk or half & half. If it's a recipe that you've used in another machine with great success but it doesn't seem to in this one, it's probably a case of how long the frozen bowl is ...


13

You will have to find a way to separate the batches of ice cream, or you'll end up with the uniform purple, as you mentioned. The proper way is to prepare three batches, using different food coloring in two of them. They should come out of the machine with a soft-serve consistency. Hold the first batches in a cool environment while preparing the last ones, ...


12

This is what we figured out at Serious Eats: How to Make Ice Cream without an Ice Cream Maker


11

If you make homemade strawberry ice cream, the color is likely to be very, very pale, approaching white. Green food coloring in your mix should do the trick. It would be very difficult to retroactively turn commercial ice cream a different color. The pink is almost certainly from food coloring, and mixing in another coloring would be very difficult ...


11

Ice cream is an emulsion of air, water, and fat. As Jefromi points out you can make gelato or Philadelphia style without egg yolks. Besides the taste and texture, egg yolk protein helps firm up the ice cream emulsion as an emulsifying agent (same way gelatin helps set Jello). Not only you don't need the Egg Yolks to make ice cream, you don't even need the ...


11

Ice cream is an emulsion and in it, you have air, fat, and ice. The smaller the ice crystals, the smoother the icecream and better chance of achieving a velvety, creamy, smooth texture. The flavor is also elevated given the smaller crystals. Put it in the freezer, and ice crystals start to grow bigger and you lose the benefits. Also, colder temperature ...


10

Try churning longer, making sure that your churn container is thoroughly frozen.


9

My cub scouts love to make camp out ice cream. You will need two cans, one significantly larger than the other both with lids (we use a #10 coffee can and a small coffee can). Make sure the small, inner can is clean and fill 2/3 of the way with an ice cream or custard mix (it will expand with churning as air is added). Place small can inside of larger can ...


9

The general things that can cause icy sorbet: Too much water Compared to other ingredients. Since you probably aren't going to take water out of your fruit, you pretty much have to add sugar or alcohol to compensate for this. This is tricky if you're improvising, and if the water content of the fruit varies. Bad churning/freezing: This is mostly determined ...


9

Ice cream depends critically on the fat in the dairy to form the structure and mouth feel. Ice cream mixes there fore are typically fairly high in dairy fat. You have substituted a comparatively low fat mock cream. which simply does not have the fat necessary to create the body of the ice cream. In fact, the so-called homemade cream recipe is just ...


9

One reason could be that dishwasher detergent significantly affects aluminum items. I learned early on that aluminum pans lost their shine and had a dark residue on the surface. Not 100% sure, but it seems like oxidation. With a good cleaning the shine can be restored. However, I no longer put any aluminum items in the dishwasher and no longer deal with this ...


9

I've accidentally run my scoop, a Zeroll with conductive fluid inside the handle, through the dishwasher. I don't know this for a fact because I didn't cut mine open to check, but I believe what happened to mine (and what's happened to yours) is that the fluid is meant to work at normal body temperature and when it gets too hot, like in a dishwasher, it ...


8

I'm seeing several answers that seem to be tiptoeing around the problem but not quite hitting it head-on... If you have time, have a look at this Serious Eats article, The Food Lab: Real Ice Cream Without an Ice Cream Machine. Although it's about making ice cream without a machine, many of the principles apply to machines as well, because the problem ...


8

You say that they were frozen with the stones? I think it is the freezing of the stones that caused it. The stone is where most of the "artificial", almondlike flavour sits, just like with apricot pits and almonds. I bet that when they were frozen, some of them cracked and [insert correct name of flavour agent] seeped out into the flesh of the fruit.


8

My dad used to buy icecream after a long day work for us (it was a 3 hour drive.) He used styrofoam boxes with some dry ice. Not sure if it can hold up till 12 hours.


8

I don't have any direct experience to share, but it seems a little logic may be applicable. I suggest that your hot fudge is too hot and your ice cream is not icy (cold) enough. Rather than microwaving the fudge, try a hot water bath on the stove. Yeah, it's slower, but you also won't burn the bejeezus out of the sugar at the edges. Taste occasionally while ...


8

Eat it faster. Seriously. I am a huge fan of homemade hot fudge and much of the appeal is the contrast between the cold and the hot. Freezing your ice cream more solid will help but insufficiently heating the chocolate won't. If the fudge gets too cool it sets up into one solid chewy chunk. Perhaps your best solution would be to serve smaller portions ...


8

In a literal sense, rumtscho and SAJ14SAJ are right. However, if you're willing to be a little adventurous, then you can do this! and without an ice cream machine. And it'll be a fun party trick, to boot. First, buy strawberry ice cream with real strawberries that isn't fully pink (like Haagen Dazs). Second, use pistachio colouring/paste, it's full ...


8

As someone who uses liquid nitrogen as part of their daily routine (in a lab) and who has made liquid nitrogen ice cream on several occasions, my advice would be to not use a plastic container to hold liquid nitrogen unless it's designed to. Yes, the plastic vessel may become brittle and may fracture. I have seen some materials shatter with extreme ...


7

The softness of ice cream is going to depend on a variety of factors: Use of gums and other binding agents, amount of sugar, the amount of fat, and especially the amount of "overrun" (air) that is churned into it during the freezing process. Less expensive ice creams will usually have a softer "chewier" texture than premium ice creams due to more gums and ...


7

Don't. Ice cream is hard. It melts slowly. Instead, focus on scooping. Get the largest spoon you have, or ideally, an ice cream scoop. Fill up a cup with boiling water, or as hot as your faucet will get it. Dip spoon/scoop in the water. Scoop. Dip. Scoop. Shake off excess water as you go. Like a hot spoon through ice cream.


7

Soft serve ice cream is soft because: It's warmer than hard ice cream. According to Wikipedia, it's generally made at about -4 C, rather than -15 C for hard ice cream. It's also served at a higher temperature -- 14 to 25 degrees F, compared to 5 to 7 degrees F for hard ice cream. It contains more air. The technical term for air introduced during freezing ...


7

When I've done this in the past, I did two things differently. I used more of a fudge sauce that would thicken and get somewhat firmer when cold. Like a fudge sauce or such. Syrup just mixes too easy. Mixing a swirl into a deeper container like the churning tub proved somewhat diffcult. As I tried to swirl, it would mix instead. Instead, I spread the ...


7

For a substance to burn, it must first reach its ignition point. For it to keep burning, it must reach its fire point. The ignition point of a 40% ABV liquid such as brandy is 26ºC/79ºF, and the fire point is approximately 10ºC higher than that. What this means in practical terms is that you need to heat the alcohol a little first before you add it to the ...



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