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13

The ingredients they post are: 1 cup solid vegetable shortening 1 teaspoon Wilton Flavor (vanilla, almond or butter) 7-8 teaspoons milk or water 1 lb. confectioners' sugar 1 tablespoon Meringue Powder pinch of salt (optional) I would make the following suggestions based on these ingredients: It's not really butter cream icing if you're using vegetable ...


12

Professionals ice on a turntable. Turntables for home use are affordable, and make icing much easier. Your spatula should reach to about the centre of the cake when held steady and comfortable. As @rfusca suggests, heating it for buttercream is a good idea. You can also wet it for other icings, to make it glide smoothly. For the icing process itself, ...


8

When heating sugar up in boiled icing or in making candy, the problem is sugar crystallization. This happens because the solution becomes supersaturated and any movement can cause it to shift back into a crystal state. The corn syrup is there to prevent this from happening by providing glucose to 'get in the way'. You can get just 'glucose' at the ...


7

Fondant is nearly solid -- it's rolled out, and placed onto the cake (with a buttercream underneath as an adhesive). The advantage is that it goes on really quickly and smoothly over large items. It can also be cut into shapes with rather clean edges (modeling chocolate gives sharper edges, but it's not flexible enough to cover a round cake). You often ...


6

If you're talking about buttercream or such icing - warm your spatula just a bit so that the icing melts just slightly as icing spatula hits it. I keep a bowl of hot water for this purpose beside the cake while icing.


6

If you cannot find these ingredients, it will be hard to get this type of icing made. The first thing is the liquid glucose. If you used any old thing labelled "syrup", chances are that it contained water, and this is what made your mix a sugar. Liquid glucose is mostly sugar, with almost no wetness to it. Substituting something very wet will not work. ...


5

There are three considerations when it comes to icing: look, texture and taste. Royal icing is stiff and mostly used for decorations. Fondant looks smooth - think of how a wedding cake looks. It's also slightly stiff and chewy in comparison to buttercream or ganache icing. You would roll this out with a rolling pin and place it on the cake instead of ...


5

There are special kinds of food colouring for icings, such as those sold by Wilton. As a rule, you should use these, not traditional food colouring. You can use ordinary food colouring but it will be hard to get the colours you want, and your icing will end up being watery/runny. The icing colours (AKA gel icings) preserve the texture of your icing and, ...


5

Liquid glucose can be replaced with plain corn syrup, in most cases. The icing sugar is almost the same as powdered sugar, if you have access to that. If you can't find powdered sugar either, you'll need to put granulated sugar into a food processor with about 2 tablespoons of cornstarch per cup of sugar and blend it until it's a fine powder. The cornstarch ...


5

If you are talking about the sculptural elements, the icing used to create those is called fondant. The name fondant comes from the french for melting. It has a consistency somewhere between play dough and tootsie rolls. Here is a good tutorial on making fondant. It can also be purchased. You can find millions of tutorials on how to work with fondant. ...


4

Based on comments to the original question: It sounds like you used the wrong type of sugar. Icing sugar is also referred to as powdered sugar or confectioner's sugar. From your description, it sounds like you used what we call (in Canada) superfine or fruit sugar (sugar for sprinkling on fruit, not from fruit).


4

The consistency of royal icing depends on many things, including the size of your eggs, but also the humidity/weather. So if you know what stiffness you want, it's perfectly valid to add sugar until it "feels right". (I usually make royal icing with meringue powder rather than fresh egg whites, which removes one variable from the equation [the size of the ...


4

Well you're kinda right about it lasting a long time due to the sugar content. That will help the preserving process to the extreme. However, to be pratical you should be looking at how long the butter fat will survive in the fridge before it starts to take on funky flavours and looses it's moisture. You'll be fine in an air tight tub for a month or so ...


4

It will freeze indefinitely (say a year) if you take two steps; 1) Seal it up good, no air exposed surfaces. Ideally a freezer bag and then suck all the air out. 2) After it thaws re-whip it just before applying. If you can, thaw it by throwing into the fridge the day before so you have more control over the temperature as you approach the time when you ...


4

There actually are a few tricks that haven't been mentioned, other than years of practice: First, you need to start off with a crumb-free cake. That is, you don't want any loose crumbs from poking through the icing, ruining the coat. After stacking, I first brush it off with a pastry brush, then I apply a 'crumb coat', a thin layer of icing that's let to ...


4

Are you sure you want to use icing? The barbie cakes I have seen all have the skirt made from rolled marzipan, not from icing. The bodice can be a normal fabric top or dress (inedible, can be washed after the cake is eaten) or also molded from marzipan. I agree that it isn't as tasty as buttercream icing, but it surely makes a more beautiful skirt. This ...


4

It's most likely (in my opinion) that the air (and subsequently air bubbles) is being introduced into your fondant at the kneading process rather than anything to do with your rolling method or surface used to roll on. Perhaps experiment a little on a more gentle but firm (as opposed to vigorous) kneading method and see if that removes those air bubbles in ...


4

The crusting is important so that any flowers or other intricate decorations will fix their shape and not slump when left out in warmer temperatures. (you don't want to refrigerate iced cakes, as when you remove them from the fridge, you'll get condensation). An icing that crusts quickly means that you can use an icing that's not quite as stiff for your ...


4

When I've seen them used, they first frosted the cake, smoothed it out, then placeed the rice paper on top. My understanding is that the moisture in the frosting can end up melting the rice paper, so that it basically disappears into the frosting, with the ink effectively transfering into the frosting. As I've never done it myself, I have no idea if there ...


3

Although Aaronut is entirely right in stating that you would be better off using alternate colourings that do not damage the texture of your icing, you can use normal food colourings, I do quite often. When I use them on fondant or marzipan, the main issue is the capacity of the icing to absorb the colouring. They have limited ability to tolerate the ...


3

I think that for casual home use, mixing your own blue and red is a perfectly fine idea. I've done it for making playdough and it is just fine. You could experiment with a few drops in water to determine the blue-to-red ratio, but unless you need a really specific color (Minnesota Vikings Purple or somesuch), just using equal amounts is fine.


3

You might be able to get that color with a blueberry juice or maybe beets, but purple food coloring would be easiest.


3

i've actually heard that you can use a hair dryer set low to do this, too.


3

I don't wish to detract from the answers offered already, but for a smooth professional finish what I think you may be looking for a product called Fondant Fondant is an extremely versatile product that can be used in a variety of ways. It can be rolled out and draped over a cake to give it a smooth clean finished look. The cake to the right ...


3

The simplest icing is just water and powdered sugar. The sugar and egg white is called 'royal icing'. I'm guessing that the difference between your result and the store bought result is oven drying; Once you apply the icing on the pastry, you put it in a low heat oven for some time until it's dry (50ÂșC, 10').


3

Meringue is a protein-based foam. The proteins form a semi-stable mesh with air bubbles trapped inside. The reason they are semi-stable is that they unravel a bit and hook into each other, Velcro-style. When you introduce fat, it lubricates and smooths the unraveled proteins, so they lose their hooking ability. If the fat is introduced before the eggwhites ...


3

I would suggest tofutti or follow your heart vegan cream cheeses which are excellent substitutes in terms of taste and texture. They work great in baked goods.


3

You'll definitely want to freeze the cake. Once it's frozen, use a spatula to apply a layer of ganache to the side that will be the bottom of the cake, then return it to the freezer. Once that has set, put the cake, ganache/bottom down on a cooling rack on top of a sheet of parchment paper or acetate. Slowly pour your melted ganache over the cake, guiding it ...


2

The ingredients that make icing creamy and give it the bulk for piped decorations, tend to be items that will go softer in heat (butter, shortening, egg whites, whipped cream). A glaze might set up if you made it sufficiently thick, but it wouldn't allow you to do anything like pipe borders. While I know it's not really a solution to what you want, your ...



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