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21

Garam masala is a catch-all term for an Indian spice blend. It has no fixed recipe but is likely to contain a combination of cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, bay, black pepper, star anise, dried chillies, coriander, cumin and maybe more or less. Blends vary according to family tradition and region. Spices are then dried out and possibly roasted, before being ...


20

What spices to buy? I have listed commonly used spices/ingredients. If you are on a budget, purchase the ones with a (!) before them. Powders and Pastes ("Masalas") (!) Coriander Powder ("Dhania Powder") (!) Cumin Powder ("Jeera Powder") (!) Red Chilli Powder ("Laal Mirch Powder") Turmeric Powder ("Haldi Powder") Garam Masala Powder Ginger Garlic Paste ...


19

This is a recipe that we used for the concierge lounge when I was a chef in the main kitchen of the Disney's Grand Floridian Resort & Spa: Paneer 5 cups whole milk 2 tablespoons lemon juice Bring the milk to a boil, add the lemon juice so that the milk separates into the curds and whey. Add a bit more lemon juice if necessary. Let set for approx. ...


19

I've seen a lot of different curry recipes with varying levels of authenticity, but the most common ingredients I see in curries that might impart that colour are: Garam masala (brown) Chili powder (red) Cumin (brown) Paprika (red) Tandoori powder (usually a mix of masala, cumin, ground red pepper, fenugreek, and others - very red) Saffron (red) Still, ...


19

If Belgian food is anything like the Dutch food my Oma made, your best bet is to limit it to the dessert course and strike out in a different direction. Even there, throwing in an extra pinch of salt and a little fresh ginger or cardamom powder may help liven it up for your friends. One area where you'll both be happy: Mediterranean/Middle-Eastern fare. ...


17

It seems to be an edible lichen. It looks very like one described online as (black) stone flower in English and dagad phool in Hindi, which seems to be a not uncommon ingredient in various spice mixes; e.g. on the left in this photo from an Indian food blog: [Edit: photo removed as I’ve just realised the author of that blog specifically requests not ...


15

Well, that depends on the individual Thai dish or Indian dish and how it was cooked, of course. But I understand what you're talking about. However, the difference in heat sensations is not due to the kind of pepper employed. It's all about fat, really. Frequently Thai dishes are made with fresh peppers, and have a lot of acid and salt in them (from ...


14

The sauces are called chutney (plural chutneys). The green one, called hari chutney in Hindi, is generally made with a mixture of coriander (cilantro) leaves and mint leaves. Hari means green in Hindi. The leaves (I have used them in a 3:1::coriander:mint ratio) are ground to a fine paste along with a tbsp of sugar, a pinch of salt, and about 2 tbsp of lime ...


14

Basically, a chutney is a kind of savoury jam. This is a very simplistic definition though. The main differences between jam and chutney are as follows: The preservation in jam is only by sugar. In chutney, vinegar and sugar are used together, so chutneys are not necessarily sweet. Jam is almost always made with fruit as the main ingredient. In ...


14

When you cook a vegetable, such as a cut-up onion, it will release water. The water initially will create an emulsion with the oil in the pan, so you won't see them as clearly separated elements, but it will also be evaporating. When enough (perhaps all) of the water has dissapated, the emulsion breaks and you see the oil separate from the rest of the ...


13

1 - Oil is separated in curries normally after you have cooked spices or sauces for ~10-15 mins. You can tell by seeing "bubbles" appearing and the oil by making a thin layer on top of your sauces/curry. 2 - It varies, but normally after 10-15 mins the oil separates from your curry. 3 - Normally after cooking for 10-15 mins most of the water dries up which ...


13

Chutney is a fairly generic term, so your confusion isn't too surprising - the definition may also vary from region to region, and it's a loanword. It's generally defined as a condiment consisting of some combination of vegetables, fruits, herbs, and/or spices. (So by definition, it's intended to be paired with other foods.) This means they're usually fairly ...


13

I'd recommend Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything Vegetarian", I use it all the time. It's certainly what I would call comprehensive; besides containing tons of recipes for everything from entrees to breads to soups, the sections are prefaced with tips on how to improvise or switch up the recipes as desired, including vegan alternatives.


12

You know, I don't think you need to overthink this too much. If you look at a typical Indian curry recipe, it might have 10 spices in it. Just leave out the cumin, and maybe bump up the other spices a little to compensate. It won't be exactly the same, but it will still be delicious. You are correct that you'll have to be careful to avoid pre-packaged spice ...


12

I think for Indian recipes you should in general look for an unstrained, set yoghurt. There are other factors that determine the final taste and texture of the yoghurt (the bacteria, the type of milk, length of fermentation, …) but you may not have much choice w.r.t. other factors than these two: Production process: Set yoghurt is yoghurt that's made the ...


12

Indian food is commonly cooked with ghee (clarified butter), for both religious and flavor reasons. Where ghee is not used, coconut or refined palm oil are common. I can also tell you from experience that Indian food can be made with unflavored vegetable oils (canola, sunflower or soy), without a deleterious effect on flavor or texture.


11

I own the same book and was similarly surprised when I read that instruction, but in the section on ingredients, the author does mention a particular variety of onions called pink onions. The mention is on pg. 32, and there is a picture of a pink onion on the upper left of pg. 34. Here's an excerpt from pg. 32: "The longer the onions are fried, the ...


10

Any kind of milk should be good. Homogenized milk doesn't make any difference; you make curds because you add a food acid. Citric acid is contained in lemons; you can also use vinegar, or even yogurt. Paneer is typical of countries like India (northern India), Pakistan, and Bangladesh. All those countries use different methods to obtain paneer. For example, ...


10

Never having been to India, I've only had naan from Indian restaurants and frozen from the supermarket. That said, I have made it with some success before. The best method I've used is to grill (American) it. You can do it with a gas grill (barbecue) set to high, or with the hottest of hot charcoal. It doesn't quite approach the 900 F (480 C) typical of a ...


10

I actually have two slightly Zen comments about this, in that they don't answer your question though they may solve your quandary. First, you might have the right spices but get the ratios wrong. In my exeprience, the ration of cumin to turmeric is about 4 to 1, sometimes more. Turmeric is to be used sparingly, half a teaspoon is usually plenty in a big ...


10

You can find recipes online for the following suggestions : One thing you can try is to give a shot to Indian Chinese cuisine. I'm sure everyone must have tried some cooking some Chinese at some point. Basically they use spices to tastefully to fire up a Chinese dish. They are pretty easy to dish out. Also you can try to mimic the Goan cuisine. Goa is a ...


10

It sounds like you're assuming that recipes are scientific creations carefully engineered to achieve a precise result. But most "recipes" are an attempt to relay a rather imprecise series of steps based on available ingredients, familiarity, superstition, and habit in a way that is approximately reproducible by someone else. Even within the bounds of ...


9

Sounds like a Cucumber Raita to me. It's quite a common accompaniment to spicy food as the yoghurt element really helps ease the burn. Very simple to make and often contains fresh mint along with the cucumber to give it a really cool, fresh taste. Example recipe here: Good Food Channel


9

Hot, medium and mild are very subjective terms, which is why it is difficult to qualify regional variations in India. I have had palak paneer in north India and south India. Generally, this dish is hotter in south India. I am a south Indian, but have lived in north India for most of my life, and would call the north Indian (traditional) variety medium. ...


9

I would say that Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian, with 650+ recipes, has been a source of great inspiration for me. It's comprehensive and boasts a great number of different styles and ingredients. Additionally it's informative, offering a lot of history about the foods, the places they have come from and the people who developed them. It strengthens the ...


9

I've had good luck baking naan on an indoor grill. I have an electric one, but you could use a stovetop one as well. Just apply a little butter, ghee, or spray oil, wipe it off, and bake. (Click for larger images) I used an alternative method to make lavash: an inverted wok over a stove burner. You'll need a gas stove to do this one. I applied them ...


8

As ever, it depends on the exact recipe. It seems to me that garlic is conspicuously missing from your list of ingredients, though. Additionally, you could try very small amount (1/4 teaspoon for a medium put to start) of the following spices: Cloves Turmeric Cinnamon Cardamom (this really sorted out a dish I was making yesterday that was tasting a little ...


8

This spice is called "Kalpaasi" in Tamilian cuisine. I use it in my chicken gravy, mutton gravy and for few vegetarian recipes too. I use kalpasi when I season some of my chutney varieties. It releases a strong curry smell the moment you add it in hot oil. This spice grows inside water wells absorbing pure air (from what I heard from my aunt when I was ...


8

Near as I can tell, it's probably the local economics. It seems to me that the cost is different per "component" but would probably balance out in the end. Chinese food, generally speaking, relies more on fresh vegetables (carrots, peas, bean-sprouts, broccoli etc.) and meat. This means that the storage costs and spoilage costs are higher relative to Indian ...


8

Paneer can be used as is. Sometimes it is fried to extend shelf life. Cooks will also sometimes fry paneer until it is slightly brown and then put the fried cubes of paneer in hot water for a few minutes. This makes paneer very soft. If you do cook paneer, it will not melt, like most other cheese varieties, because it's an acid-set cheese.



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