Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Yoghurt is indeed used in some Indian curries. After preparing the curry paste just add yoghurt and stir. Stirring is important. Stir well till the yoghurt blends in with the curry paste into a smooth curry or it will separate. Yoghurt is not suitable for all curries in general. Add it if for a little sour flavour in the curry.


1

It depends on what you are cooking, yogurt is used as marinade for few barbeque dishes like tandoori chicken,paneer tikka and it's used in making curries in many dishes as Srilekha mentioned. Yogurt is added at the end and is cooked no more than 2-5 mins for the simple reason it seperates water when cooked on high tempreture and reduces it's sourness and ...


1

The crispiness also depends on your rice to urad dal ratio. If its 2:1 or 3:1, and the batter is thinner, you can get crispy dosas at home as well. I use a heavy non-stick pan which doesn't require oil coating, but you can add a tiny amount of oil, especially around the edges to get extra crispiness. Here's a video which show what I have suggested: ...


0

Grill on high heat. The marinate, together with the fat, will form a delicious crust, something special indeed. If heat is not high, it will not chat, but become soft and gooey.


3

The crispness comes from the very high heat of the very thick cast iron skillet used in restaurants. The usual non stick pan, unless it is made of heavy cast iron, cannot produce that crispness. Kind of the American reason why oven pizza does not come out nice and crusty like the stone oven pizza. The ingredient is the very high heat that is missing here.


0

Raw taste of food means that either you add too little spice or the spices don't mix well with the food, leaving some of the food raw. Make the curry first, and then add the food, and then coat it with the curry. If you add the food first, then stir fry it, then add spices, then it won't mix evenly. On top, the spices being added in the end will end up ...


0

I have to disagree on salt. Indian cuisine is all about spices. A agree with Will that the proper sauteing of the spices is very important. I would never use fresh tomatoes in any Indian dish I use my own frozen Roma tomates or store bought canned. I would still like to know what dish you are trying to make, Jaguar. The first key is to start with a great ...


1

The really strong spicy flavor comes from infusing the oil with spice at the beginning. Pan on medium low heat Add oil and garlic chopped from a jar Cyanne powder shake shake shake Chili powder shake shake shake Garam masala shake shake shake Stir around a minute Add onions after chopping them and caramelize on medium low. Add a splash of water ...


0

Maybe you are expecting too much from too simple a sauce ... a restaurant style curry, for example, will typically use any or all of coconut milk, yoghurt, cream, nut pastes, besan... I would suggest you cook eg Sanjay Thumma's Maharashtrian Wedding Style Navratan Korma by the recipe, and see if that is the kind of result you were looking for. Also check ...


1

If you think your Indian dishes simply don't have enough spices, you have two choices: Keep adding spices until it's spicy enough. Things like curries are really easy to repeatedly taste and add to. Find recipes you like. It's hard to improvise if you don't have much experience, but you can find a blog/website/cookbook that suits you and cook away. Once ...


1

I'm curious about which Indian dish you are making. Friends and family are always begging me for my Chicken Tika Masala and Butter Chicken. I would recommend you buy your spices at an Indian grocery if there is one available. The prices are nothing compared to a grocery store and they usually come in larger quantities. As an example, I purchased 3.5 oz of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included