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25

A regular electric oven uses a large coiled resistor as a heating element. A large electric current is passed through this element which generates heat, similar to the tungsten filament of an incandescent light bulb. An induction stove doesn't actually generate heat itself, but rather induces it the pot or pan. It does this using a rapidly oscillating ...


9

As you probably know, induction burners produce an alternating magnetic field that induces a current in the cookware. This process can produce attractive and repulsive forces as well that cause vibrations. The problem can be caused not only by poor sandwiched construction but by an uneven bottom surface, or loose parts or lids. I have read that some people ...


6

Yes, it will work. The induction interface disks are practically the same thing as a griddle. Of course, both disks and griddles mean that the induction stove will behave like a resistive stove (slow heating, etc.) If you want to get your money's worth from the induction stove, replace your cookware. The combination with cast iron is great, as it gives you ...


6

Induction cooking works by generating an electric current in the metal cooking vessel and converting that current into heat, which requires a resistive material (i.e. a poor conductor). It's a bit of a catch-22, because you need a good conductor to actually distribute that heat. This is why some of the best induction cookware is clad metal - two layers of ...


6

Some approximate figures Energy efficiency while cooking Induction 90% Electric resistive 55% Gas 50% Energy efficiency while heating up Induction 99% Electric resistive 0% Gas 0% Time, total energy used, and cost to boil 2 l of Water Induction 2:20, 0.2 kWh, $0.034 Electric resistive 5:00, 0.34 kWh, $0.058 Gas 4:00, 0.37 kWh, $0.016 Assumptions ...


5

Depends on what you mean by "cost effective", and what expectations you have of cooking evenness. A solid fuel stove will probably be cheapest (grandma style wood or coal oven), followed by a resistive electric stove and the most expensive stove being induction electric. This covers the initial cost of the stove itself. The quality of heating goes along ...


5

Cracking? No, not in my experience. I own like 20 cast iron skillets (I've been told I have a problem). Warping? Yes. I have a 2,800 watt per burner commercial induction stove with a very small pattern like yours. If you repeatedly overheat a pan on high for searing, it will eventually bow outwards. Warping can be mitigated by preheating your pan gently. ...


4

One important factor in induction cooking is surface contact. This means that the base has to be sturdy. I have a carbon steel skillet similar to your option. After about one year, it's starting to warp. So, I wouldn't buy one, if I were you. You say that forged is thinner than cast iron... I'd go for the cast iron. As for the heat transfer, induction ...


4

I had a question a few weeks ago regarding induction vs gas. Since that time, I have spoken with a few people who have switched to an induction range from either gas or electric. A couple of aspects not mentioned above, regarding differences between resistive electric and induction, are control and response. According to my sources, the temperature in a ...


4

Most reputable sources say that curved surfaces such as woks don't work as well on induction stoves. They even make special tools and cooktops for inductively heating woks. This phenomenum could be because of the angled surface or the extra distance from the cooktop, but it's probably both. It's not that these surfaces are immune to induction heating, just ...


3

I don't think there is any single answer to this question, because it would depend on: The type and thickness of the steak The starting temperature of the steak How well you like it done (because the goal is to get enough browning and crust development on the outside, without crossing over into burning, while still cooking the steak through) The ...


3

The phenomenon is called magnetostriction, and occurs when the oscillating magnetic field causes the cookware to change shape rapidly. This frequency will be twice that of the electromagnetic field of the cooker, which is typically over 20kHz, which means that the base frequency of the vibrations is well into the inaudible range of the spectrum. However, ...


3

I made a sous-vide setup that uses a slow cooker and no pump. I was able to observe as much as a 5 degree temperature gradient from the bottom to the top of the cooker. A big part of the problem was that my target food almost fills the cooker and impedes convection. I didn't measure the temperature gradient with an empty bath. My setup worked passably ...


3

You're perhaps missing a point about induction cooking when you bring heat transfer into the equation. Induction cooking is magnetic flux generating heat in the material, so the heat generation is virtually instantaneous; in fact, temperature "overshoot" is a bit of a problem in cast iron, so the skillet should remain on the "burner" surface for about three ...


3

Induction just heats the pan using magnetism. Aside from very high efficiency, it isn't so different from any other method, and how hot the oil gets is an issue of power output and heat transfer/conductivity of the pan itself. There isn't an appreciable difference in how the physics work inside the pan. Clearly your oil is not hot enough for ...


3

Induction cooking is accomplished through a magnetic field created in the hob that excites (causes to vibrate) the IRON ATOMS in the cooking vessel you use. This is what causes your pan to heat. If there is no iron in the pan (non-ferrous stainless steel, tin lined copper pots, aluminum pots and pans, glass or clay cooking vessels, etc) they WILL NOT heat! ...


3

Having nothing to do with induction stoves, you should always preheat your cast iron or any pan for that matter. Adding a bit more to my answer, although you have to take more care not to break the top of your stove, cast iron and induction stoves are a marriage made in cooking heaven. They are very well suited for one another. Nothing beats an actual ...


2

What you will be dealing with is called stratification. Given a reasonable volume of water the difference can be quite remarkable. A one metre height of water can stratify water from 20°C to 95°C as long as the water is not disturbed and heated gently, even if heated from the bottom The simple solution is to regularly stir the water, say once every five ...


2

If you like to cook using 3 or more elements at once, ensure you buy a sufficiently powered model. There's nothing more frustrating than upping the power on one element and watching another one reduce at the same time. Touch controls look nice but they're horrible from a usability standpoint. I always had problems with responsiveness with wet or greasy ...


2

For the most part and not denigrating anybody else's very valid opinions, I can definitely say that in my case the "noises" were caused by the fans getting slightly out of balance from collected grease etc. A good service and re- positioning of the fans on their axles always clears my noise problems. Do not forget that there are normally at least two fans, ...


2

You can get a single or double burner induction cooktop. They are relatively inexpensive, most efficient electric burners, and perform well in cooking. You will need induction compatible cookware though. They are in most sense better than other electric cooktops. The old resistive element burners are cheaper though. Fuel based stoves have similar ...


2

I have an induction stove and have had similar marks. I think rumtscho is right; these are mineral deposits from water. Water gets between the surface and the pan, most likely because the base of the pan was initially wet (spillage from the pan will mostly end up beside it, and only areas directly under the pan will get significantly hot), the heat of the ...


2

In my experience, the lowest setting of my induction cooker - 120 watts - is too high and results in scorched chocolate and will also burn dairy products like a cheese sauce. I wouldn't use it for a fondue - I would use a candle. It's possible this restaurant had specialty induction cookers that could reach lower temperatures. My single-burner el cheapo ...


2

It sounds like the only thing you can do is use an interface disk - basically a piece of metal that is compatible with the induction cooktop, which will then transfer the heat to the espresso maker. You can also potentially use an induction-compatible pan as an interface - see this question. Unfortunately either way, you'll lose the fast-response benefit ...


1

This answer assumes that you are using a moka pot. Though you don't state it explicitly, it seems to me that the problem is that your espresso maker is not compatible with an induction stove top. The solution, then, is to get one that is compatible.


1

I am guessing you had a bit of fluid either on the bottom of the pan or on the top of your stove. It could have been almost any fluid including water. Even though your pans can get really hot, water trapped under a pan doesn't seem to boil away very quickly, and the longer the pot sits on top of the fluid, the thinner it is pressed, thus turning into a ...


1

It will not work well. A comment on the American Amazon site claims that a magnet will not stick to the pot. The pot also does not have a heat diffusion bottom with extra material that could be magnetic. Stainless steel can be made magnetic, but most is not.


1

You can call the manufacturers and ask them if it is "INDUCTION READY" The packaging & the insert with specifications & instructions should say that. Youu can ask the customer service at Amazon too, may be they will have the answer. But I also located an answer on the internet, which I am including the link: ...


1

There are also other parameters to consider. A gas cooker will use half of the energy (according to TFD's brilliant answer) to heat the room. If you live in cold climate this is almost an added boon as gas is a fairly cheap way to heat your dwelling. If, on the other hand, you live in a warmer climate (I don't know much about Arizona, but I haven't heard ...


1

TDF gave a fantastic answer as far as price for the usage of the product, but you also have to factor in a few other things. While the induction ovens are by far the most effective, you also have to consider that only certain pans will work on an induction surface. You also can't have pans that have a textured bottom as they will scratch the surface. On top ...



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