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2

@Stefano's answer is obviously the accepted one, linking to the thing closest to being an official recipe. I still want to add an alternative answer though, that includes some empirical evidence. It combines the results from recipes highly ranked by Google. Gathering those recipes (and assigning the "official" source double score), I've ranked the ...


4

Italy is very protective of its food heritage and there are many examples of recipes being officially codified by various authorities, e.g, the EU designation, Traditional Speciality Guaranteed, was applied to pizza margherita in 2009 and strictly mandates the ingredients that may be used. The recipe for Ragu alla Bolognese doesn't have the weight of the ...


4

Brown/black mustard seed is hotter and more intense than yellow. So, powdered mustard seed that is predominantly brown/black is going to pack quite a wallop compared to powdered yellow mustard seed. In the US, recipes calling for powdered mustard are going to expect you to use yellow. See Serious Eats for an interesting article on the subject.


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If you are open to use a different kind of frosting you can use egg white frosting. It is super white. Whisk egg white Add ice sugar until consistance is creamy. You might need an important amount of sugar to make it thick enough. I don't have numbers here, I usally add progressively until good. Apply Let dry. It can be long for thick layer.


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Here are some suggestions: To make the frosting whiter: If you use butter, eliminate it. Use all of the other standard ingredients but substitute heavy whipping cream for the butter. Add until you have the consistency you want. While I can't say I would do this, a viable option would be to substitute a good brand of vegetable shortening for the butter. ...


2

There's no exact definition of asian toasting seeds that I know of, but most mixes I've seen are geared more for curries with cumin, sesame, and black onion seeds as a common base. To that base I've seen poppy, black mustard, yellow mustard, fenugreek, and lovage (ajwain) seeds. I have all of these except lovage, but kept separate and I mix them together ...


2

Someone taught me a method that hasn't failed me yet: the "reverse turkey-timer" (as I call it). You could gently squeeze an avocado to see if it's soft, but I think you're more likely to feel bruising than ripeness. Other shoppers (like you!) could have damaged it with aggressive squeeze-testing, and unless you have the luxury of local fruit (it's a ...


1

Well, what the heck... I'll have a go as well. One of the better recommendations I've seen for getting started with a home bar comes from one of my favorite books, Craft Cocktails at Home. The author recommends starting to stock your bar by drink: that is, identify a single cocktail you really enjoy, and buy the ingredients for that. Then, another. And ...


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I agree with @logophobe; open-ended and/or subjective questions are frowned-upon as you probably know from your other SE sites. That said, I like mixology (though I despise that term...), but I am no professional. I'll try to pick off a few parts that were helpful for me as I started this hobby, and hope that will either help you get started, or help you ...



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