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Scarface was the nickname of the early 20th century American organized crime boss, Al Capone. He was slashed in the face while working at a New York City nightclub. The injury left a scar that led to the nickname. Capone's parents immigrated from Italy, and it is said that he enjoyed eating Italian foods. The notoriety and name-recognition of Al Capone ...


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From a historical perspective, calzone were imported from Europe (like normal pizzas) while stromboli are an American invention. In Europe, following the Italian tradition, calzone are basically folded pizzas. They are made with the same dough, are baked in the same ovens, and can have the same toppings, although it is far more common in Italy to see eggs ...


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Since the flavor of mint fades with heat, I suggest you add the dried mint as a topping upon serving after you turn off the heat, and after pouring your recipe into the serving dish.


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Pure peppermint, wintergreen oils, and menthol crystals are easily found online. A little goes a long way, and they'll stand up to 100°C for at least 15 minutes.


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A quarter teaspoon of calcium hydroxide (slaked lime) will neutralize acid nicely, without adding a nasty flavor as does sodium bicarbonate. Found this out while nixtamalizing corn for tortillas. It works well for over-acid tomatoes, but you want to avoid adding too much as the base itself is not very soluble. You can buy the stuff at any Mexican or Latin ...


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The aroma and flavor of mint is destroyed very rapidly by heat. If you want a big mint impact, I would eliminate the dried (dried herbs can be good, but are a completely different flavor profile from fresh) and add a lot of fresh mint immediately before serving.


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You can' "cook off" acidity, but you can balance it. Typically in marinara, that is done with a small amount of sugar, or, better yet, half of a grated carrot per 28 oz can of tomatoes, sweated with your onion.



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