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10

The only way to test for capsaicin besides tasting is chemical testing, namely liquid chromatography. Problem is, the same kind of chili can be quite different in heat, even on the same bush it can be quite different from my experience. No idea why, though. Here is one tip on how to check the heat of a chili without actually eating part of it, but still ...


10

What we do in our house is dice them, freeze them on a cookie sheet (one layer deep) and then when frozen, pour them into a ziploc. The cookie sheet step is necessary to keep them from freezing into a clump if you go straight into the ziploc and then the freezer. You can then easily portion them out from frozen as you need them, and they're so small from ...


5

As near as I can determine, "nacho sliced" is simply a marketing term for such pre-sliced, pickled jalapeno peppers. A quick Google for the term brings up several brands which appear identical to one another. There are also similar combinations of the words such as "nacho jalapenos, sliced". The bottle on the right is the only one labelled as such, but ...


5

There's quite a few recipes online. This one seems pretty simple. It looks like in general, you: Liquify your peppers Cook the result with vinegar Strain it Cook the result with salt and sugar Add some pectin Add some whole jalepenos (probably optional) Transfer to jars


4

I have found that the problem with thicker batters not adhering to peppers generally is to do with the outer membrane protecting the flesh of the jalapeno. Essentially, you need to try to remove or weaken its effect. You can minimize the effect of the membrane by: roasting the pepper, then steam in a brown paper bag and remove it scoring the membrane ...


4

I've pickled them in the past. They lose their texture when you do this, so afterward they are only good in chili or other dished where you cut then small. Like stephen I've frozen them chopped and had good luck. Finally, I've cut them into strips, strung the strips on a sting and air dried them. I wasn't terribly happy with the results for jalpenos ...


3

Yep, it's possible! AllRecipes has a highly rated recipe for Jalapeño jelly: http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/jalapeno-jelly/Detail.aspx


3

First, Jalapenos do not ripen once picked. No pepper does. Red jalapenos are actually ripe and have more flavor, although they are not, in my experience, any hotter than the standard green, slightly-less-than-ripe, jalapenos. There is no relationship between shape and capsaicin content that I know of. So, mostly you're just trying to get jalapenos ...


3

I've dried out chillies a bunch of times, both with and without a fan-assisted oven. It's much easier with a fan oven, but not impossible with a conventional oven, but it is wasteful of energy in a conventional oven as you have to leave the door cracked. That and you must have an oven that has a very low setting. The reason that heat works is that heating ...


2

It might be a case of changing packaging; I've often seen two identical products from the same brand labelled differently, and by a few weeks later one of them has vanished due to a phased release of a new branding. Notice how the pattern on the label is brighter, and the whole label is slightly taller, giving more room for the photo of food on the top. The ...


2

Cut them in half lengthwise, stuff the resulting boats (deseeded if you don't want them too hot) with a little cheese and grill them (indoors or on the BBQ). Yum.


2

If they are less hot than jalepeno peppers and more crispy then they probably aren't jalapeno peppers, or at least not standard ones. There are hundreds of pepper varieties and many look very similar but have different heat properties, and different textures. Or they could be jalepenos but grown in cooler conditions or different soil from your typical ...


2

When it comes to drying, air flow is actually more important than temperature. If your oven does not have a convection mode, I wouldn't even bother. Furthermore, even if your oven does have a convection mode, chances are that it cannot maintain a low enough temperature to dry the peppers without actually cooking them in the process. If you know that your ...


2

The primary conditions affecting hotness (capsaicin production) are genetic and environmental. Stressed plants generally produce more capsaicin than non-stressed plants, all other things being equal. This is why some weeks you'll go the the grocery and get jalapenos that are quite mild, and other weeks some peppers that look identical will rip your face ...


1

I read an article on seriouseats that suggested "double breading" them. They also suggest tossing them in the freezer for a while before breading and before frying to prevent the filling from leaking.


1

The hotter the pepper the more small dark lines on the outside!


1

Don't forget about jellies, sauces, and salsas. I sometimes puré extra peppers, onions, and garlic together, and freeze that (or can it). Makes a great addition to soups and stews later, or a starter for fresh salsas and mole sauce.



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