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13

according to the Ball canning book (paraphrasing)... JAM is made by cooking crushed or chopped fruits with sugar, and is made of one fruit or a combination of fruits, is spreadable, and is firm but will not hold the shape of the jar. JELLY is made from juice strained from fruit, usually prepared in a way to keep it crystal clear, and is gelatinized enough ...


12

The usual explanation given is that adding butter to the fruit and sugar before you cook it will reduce (or even eliminate) the foaming. My guess is that the small amount of proteins in the fruits create the foam. As you heat the fruit, the proteins open up into strands that get tangled up and help stabilize the bubbles into a foam. Adding the butter (a ...


7

If your jam has at least 1:1 ratio (1 kg of sugar per kg of fruit) or more, you do not have to can it. Then it is so overwhelmingly sweet that bacteria cannot live in it. If the jam has less sugar (1:2 are popular, 1:3 are found sometimes), then you have to either can it, or keep it in the fridge and consume it within a few days, similar to any other ...


6

Yes. See the accepted answer for Can most sour fruits be jelled by cooking with sugar?. After getting that answer, I have successfully made apple jelly with fresh cooked and strained apple juice and sugar, and nothing else. You can search for apple jelly recipes and find directions.


6

Perfect idea and great multi-use of your jam! Your plan is perfect...just create a nice sweet tart balance to your liking. If you want a little more texture you could plump up some golden or dark raisins by nuking them in the microwave before adding. Coriander seed is often used and provides a little texture contrast as well. A bit of ground allspice ...


6

All home-canned food should be used within a year. This assumes you follow the strict sterilization regimen required by jarring/canning at home. You should also store them in a cool, dark, dry place between 50-70°F. Over time changes in color, flavor, and texture is inevitable. This will result in a degradation of quality in the product, but as long as the ...


6

From the National Center for Home Food Preservation: Making Jelly without Added Pectin Making Jam without Added Pectin Use a mixture of 3/4 ripe and 1/4 under-ripe high-pectin fruits. Under-ripe or just barely ripe fruit contains the most pectin. Cook the fruit with cores and peels to add extra pectin (but do remove stems or pits). Put through a sieve ...


5

You can simply simmer off enough liquid until any fruit is thick. For example, I make a blueberry sauce for pancakes and blintzes by just putting some blueberries, sugar, and a pinch of salt in a saucepan, bringing to a boil, and then reducing heat to low until it is as thick as I want. When cooled in the fridge, it will be pretty jammy. (This isn't a ...


5

The historical purpose of jam is to preserve fruit from a time of bounty to a time when it is less plentiful. Therefore, to be a candidate for jam making, the fruit must be reasonably plentiful in the region where it would be preserved. Technically, in order to form a jam or a jelly, there must be sufficient pectin and sufficient acid in the fruit to ...


4

According to the Smucker's web site, their products will last 24 months from the date of production. They should also have a use by date on the label. According to Shelf Life Advice, it should be good at least one year from the purchase date, although they recognize that it's not exact. I'd say that you could probably try it -- if it's unopened, the ...


4

There are many causes for the jam being grainy, but most commonly, as @hobodave suggested, is due to inadequate dissolution of sugar. The test is simple. Get some jam into a bowl, add a little bit of water, stir, does it resolve the problem? If yes, then it is a dissolution problem. There, you may want to change the method of making that jam -- if your ...


4

Yes, I've done this. The key is to ensure that the jam isn't filling the glass container completely so that as it freezes it has room to expand. I used a typical Ball canning jar, which sealed well enough to keep ice crystals out for several months. From what I understand, freezer canning is useful when you don't have a pressure canner but want to can ...


4

On the contrary, most of the older recipes that I've seen for jams use more sugar (60g per 100g or higher is common) than is popular in some of the newer products, because sugar has a preservative effect. But most likely pre-refrigeration and pre-iceboxes you simply wouldn't have kept multiple jars open at the same time; you'd use one at a time as quickly as ...


4

The reason why we "can" things is to prevent spoilage. It allows you to make a number of batches of something (like Jam) and then store it on the shelf, unrefrigerated for extended periods of time until you're ready to open the jar. That said, when you finally do open it, you're assured that the large majority of bacteria was killed at the start of the ...


4

Once the jar is opened, it may get contaminated, by anything suspended in the air, by cross-contamination ...etc. sunlight air heat moisture nutrients (your jam) All of these will provide good conditions for cell culture (e.g. molds). Make sure you keep it sealed properly and stashed away in a dry cool place. Because there are no preservatives, there is ...


3

Common names of plants are a very unclear matter. There are big differences not only between languages, but also regional differences within a single language. There are lots of (closely related) plants which are sold under the name blueberry. And probably not even the person who grew (or gathered) them can tell you the exact species. While it does matter ...


3

I did actually do two batches with the two methods within a few weeks of asking the question. Just cooking it all together, then removing the skins and seeds with a food mill, is definitely a lot faster. Removing the skins first then pureeing, so that you only remove the seeds later... well, though it is easy to remove the skin from each individual grape, ...


3

If it's getting cooked too much, well, stop cooking it. You can cover it to prevent water loss. If it's too hot sitting on the same burner (on an electric stove), move the pot. It sounds like your cast-iron pot might be part of the problem, too - if it's still staying too hot, you could pour it into something else. Finally, if you do still have significant ...


3

Jam and jelly have VERY long shelf lives both in the cupboard, unopened as well as in the refrigerator. The acidic environment and concentration of sugar make it an inhospitable environment for bacterial growth. Typically the only changes you'll see are darkening of color (unopened in the cupboard) and possible "sugaring" in the refrigerator (development of ...


3

The only way I know is by adding some more liquid and warming the mixture, It may or may not improve things... For what its worth, the consistency of the jam after cooking, tends to be related to the amount of sugar added for a given fruit, with hard skinned fruit typically requiring a slightly different process to soft skinned fruit. It's also controlled ...


3

Were your blueberries grainy? I occasionally get a pint that have a grainy texture. I've heard that this means they aren't quite fresh, but they usually taste just fine despite the texture. I'm not sure if this particular graininess translates to a jam though. Jam can also get grainy from sugar that isn't fully dissolved. This can happen more easily with ...


3

Graininess caused by excess undissolved sugar is fairly obvious. The grains will be sweet and will dissolve on the tongue. Alternatively, with some fruit including blueberries, the skins of the fruit can be dry or tough and stay in grainy fragments in the jam. Again, this is obvious. The individual shreds will be dark and flat, etc. Another, in my opinion, ...


3

In addition to the sweetness, marmalade has a pronounced bitter flavor that could overpower the fish. It seems that others feel the same way — there are few online recipes for fish with marmalade, and of those few, most are for salmon which has a more robust taste of its own to balance out the marmalade. Perhaps something like an apricot preserve would be ...


2

There's also freezer jams, which can easily last a few years in a deep-freeze without losing much quality. They're well sealed, so there's little moisture loss / freezer burn, there's little loss of quality aside from the initial freezing, and you don't have to worry about mold or other organism growing in the freezer.


2

Have you tried using a candy thermometer and testing the jam when it's at 220°F? An alternative to the method that you use is to use a spoon and do the 'two drop test'. If you dip a cold metal spoon into your jam mix and then lift it. When the mixture is only just boiling it will drip off and be light. As the mixture continues to heat the drops that fall ...


2

Cane sugar or corn syrup is a relatively modern invention. Prior to these people did not have such sweetness available (other than fruit or honey), or used beets, carrots etc. for increased sweet flavours Many cultures simply boiled fruit in an earthenware pot until it reduced to a sufficient thickness, and then put on the matching earthenware lid and seal ...


2

Jam is fruit, sugar, and pectin. You added more fruit but all that liquid in the fruit wasn't gelled with the pectin and sugar. You could try adding sugar and heating the jam to get the pectin to gel with the new juice. This could work but is likely to be error prone. Pectin gelling is tricky and it might not re-gel. I would recommend adding some sugar, ...


2

If you have a bit of sun (as it is a summertime method); * Pour the jam into a tray and leave it under the sun for some days. Check and stir the jam time to time until it reaches to desired thichness. *The top of the tray should be covered with a thin cotton cloth/muslin in case any dust etc. not to get into the jam while it is still having sun and breating. ...


2

I use nylon straining bags for making wine. You can get them in various sizes at homebrew stores. (for example: http://www.midwestsupplies.com/nylon-straining-bag-18-x-32-coarse-mesh.html) I'm sure they'd do the trick for what you need. Although this may only work for passing juice, you might inquire at your local homebrew store if they have a slightly ...


2

In terms of killing pathogens, it is a belt and suspenders thing. The additional processing ensures that any pathogens that entered the jars while you were filling them are killed. More importantly, as Jefromi has reminded us, the additional boiling with the assembled and lidded jars causes the header air to heat up, expanding in volume and raising the ...



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