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14

That item in the bottom right is Tamago nigiri, a slice of omelette on top of seasoned rice.


14

Yes, those spots are normal, they form as the nattou ages. They are amino acid crystals, and they are perfectly safe. Here's a picture. They're a bit crunchy, which you may or may not like. If you don't like the dots, get young nattou and consume it before the crystals form. If you do like them, get more mature nattou. With younger nattou, you should be ...


13

Hibachi are technically a traditional Japanese device used for heating one's house. They are a basic, heat-proof container that holds charcoal. The cooking devices that many people refer to as "hibachi" are what the Japanese would call "shichirin": I'm guessing that the term "hibachi" was popularized in North America because "shichirin" can be hard to ...


13

Japanese spicy mayo is made with Kewpie mayo and Shichimi tōgarashi. You really just mix them to taste.


12

According to an article about Fugu at Maldova Welcome: Some people who’ve tried puffer dishes describe it as one of the most sublime flavors in the world. Others, apparently less enthusiastic, or simply more objective, describe fugu meat as a cross between crunchy and chewy, said by the Japanese to go “shiko-shiko” in one’s mouth when absolutely ...


10

Soy sauce, sake or mirin and sugar are the usual ingredients in a teriyaki sauce. The rice wines in particular are vital for an authentic teriyaki flavour. So the question is somewhat moot: onions aren't usually found in teriyaki sauce anyway. The onions naturally add flavour to your marinade: if you like it, leave them in, if you don't, take them out. The ...


8

Just keep it dry. I buy 100 sheets packs and store them in a zip-loc type bag in the cupboard for over a year


7

Not being aware of your location, some general tips: 1) Buy your fish from a fishmonger, and tell him/her what you are using it for. You want to do business with somebody who's business is selling fish and only selling fish. They are going to know what's been stored to eaten raw standards in a way that the just above minimum wage fish guy at your grocery ...


7

Since dashi is, after all, made with seaweed and dried fish, it will smell and taste a bit of the sea. If you don't eat or prepare much seafood, this smell might seem quite strong to you; for people, like most Japanese people, who eat fresh seafood five times a week, the smell and taste are subtle. The other possibility is that you made an error in ...


6

Sure, it's really not that difficult if you've actually tasted several kinds of dashi-jiru. It's more a matter of experience. There is decidedly a flavor to each category of dashi; it's not just "umami" or you would be able to get away with just throwing in a bunch of MSG into a bowl of water. But the flavor is mostly from aroma, like with other types of ...


6

There are many different kinds of "an" paste. Left unspecified, the generic type is "red beans", specifically azuki. I've found it pretty easy to find azuki beans in Germany, the US, Japan and Korea, so I can't imagine it being terribly hard anywhere else; in the US and Germany it was often sold by natural foods shops when there wasn't an Asian market ...


6

Several options, depending on the type of curry and the ingredients already present. Japanese Style Curries Using a commercial, packaged Japanese-style roux: Add another brick or two from the package. This type dissolves nicely generally with minimal clumping. Using a homemade, Japanese style roux: You can prepare additional roux by melting fat (butter, ...


5

You should have searched a bit more on Wikipedia :) Yam is not the sweet potato most people know in the US, but a kind of root. For the preparation of okonomiyaki it doesn't really matter which one. I don't know where you can buy this, but my advise is to ask in your grocery store, market or specialized (African or Asian food) shop.


5

You can also use regular mayo and sriricha hot sauce. Ain't authentic, but it's a lot easier to come by, for the most part.


5

I wouldn't trust anything from a grocery-store fish counter to be fit for raw consumption. http://www.sushifaq.com/sushiotaku/2008/01/31/where-to-buy-sushi-grade-fish/ has a lot of info, and suggests http://www.catalinaop.com/ . I've never bought anything from them, but it looks like they're probably a good source if you want to buy online. If you're in the ...


5

Your best choices would be top sirloin (#1 choice), tenderloin, or one of the other (less expensive) sirloin cuts. Those cuts will be tender, flavorful, and without pockets of fat or gristle to mar the appearance of your dish. I don't recommend round because I simply don't like its flavor. Using round in this application might be one of the best ...


4

Many of the dried noodles that are marketed as "udon"—at least in my experience in the USA—are actually mislabeled, thinner noodles like Hiyamugi or even Sōmen. I would suggest buying the semi-dried variety that are usually packaged in vacuum sealed plastic. This variety is shelf stable, but it can often be found in the refrigerated section of Asian ...


4

I hate to say it, but I'd be willing to bet that gluten-free udon is about as practical as gluten-free seitan - the gluten is precisely what gives udon noodles the texture that makes them so special. Having said that, I've bought frozen udon noodles that had tapioca starch as an ingredient in addition to wheat flour, and those were some of the best udon ...


4

No, you really can't. First of all the color of the rice would be off. Second, the chinkiang vinegar has a rather strong, slightly burnt flavour that I do not think would go well with sushi. I suppose if you were trying to go beyond the traditional sushi style you could try it. I guess it might work. But if you are striving towards the traditional sushi ...


4

I think it's a Seven Spice Powder (Shichimi Togarashi) that may vary somewhat depending on where you are; It's something like this. Probably available at most asian grocery stores or on Amazon.


4

There are two main reasons that may cause your onigiri to fall apart: For Onigiri, You must be use either medium grain rice or short grain rice. Both types of rice are sticky enough for the rice to stick to each other. Japanese rice and certain italian rices such as arborio works well. If you are using long grain rice (such as jasmine rice), the onigiri ...


4

Don't let the rice cool, it should still be quite hot. There are some ideas at Just Bento on ways to make it using plastic wrap or a baggie so you don't have to handle the hot rice directly; there was also discussion of plopping rice into a jar and shaking based on a video, but it was decided the rice cools too quickly for it to work for more than 1-2 ...


4

Things to try Rice should still be warm Handle rice gently, don't squeeze it Does it fall apart because it is sticking to your hands? If so: Use warm salt water on your hands (not dripping wet hands though) Rinse the rice more before cooking to remove excess surface starches. The process is: Rinse in bowl of water, gently tumble, let stand 20 minutes, ...


4

Place one of the take no tsuyu in a bowl then you pour boiling water over. The rice cake outer layer will soften and come apart as you stir it with your chopsticks and the red bean soup powder inside will hydrate and create a flavorful broth.


4

For ramen, udon, and soba, it is not uncommon for Japanese restaurants to use multiple broths for layered flavors. My friend is from Yamagata in Japan and several of her favorite Udon places will make a sturdy broth with dashi as well as pork and chicken stocks. When I make noodles at home, I almost always start with dashi and fortify with chicken or pork ...


4

Food.com actually provides a recipe for making it, saying: Yushi doufu is tofu that has not been pressed and formed, but simply scooped out after tofu coagulates... The ingredients are soy beans, water, and nigari.


4

There are a number or styles of soy sauces used in Japanese cuisine. Saishikomi shoyu is sometimes described as sweet compared to regular Koikuchi shoyu. Additionally there are soy-based sauces available in the US that have added ingredients such as corn syrup or MSG to enhance specific flavors. Kikkoman makes an "enhanced" soy sauce that they call ...


3

It's "a slimy potato" - http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dioscorea_opposita. It might be available in Asian grocery stores. You could probably get by without it. Okonomiyaki translates literally as "cook as you like it". It's a savory pancake-like batter, to which is added whatever you want; often whatever you happen to have lying around the kitchen. ...


3

http://vegetarianandhealth.blogspot.com/2008/11/udon-noodles-from-scratch.html here is a site that has a recipe for gluten-free udon. It is a vietnamese type noodle but it works very well with udon soups as it is similar to udon. Our family loves udon but since my 2 yr old son has to be on a gluten free diet, so do we since he cannot understand yet why he ...


3

In fact, there is some precedent for this. 黒酢, romanized kurozu, is used in sushi at a a Tokyo restaurant called Kyo-zan, which claims to be the originator of the black vinegar sushi style. It would likely be considered a novelty in Japan, but black vinegar was super-trendy about 6-8 years ago in Japan and all sorts of new uses, including sweetened, ...



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