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The consequences are a relatively trivial loss in flavor-enhancing compounds (the glutamates). There's no reason to waste water removing it. I vaguely recall some books like Gaku Homma's Japanese Country Cooking suggested you could wipe off the kombu with a wet paper towel if you like, but that's not really necessary, or in my experience, even remotely ...


1

The traditional way to begin to cook the pork belly for Buta No Kakuni is by boiling it in okara for a significant amount of time—say, 45 minutes. These are the left-over 'lees' from the creation of tofu, and may very well be free (as it is at the again-open Denver Tofu company) if you're fortunate enough to live by a tofu factory. I suspect this ...


2

No! Not only is it unnecessary, it's kind of the point of using kombu. You want the glutimates for the umami, right? Don't rinse.


1

Shiso is in the mint family. Stick to that area and you'll be fine, even though nothing will be exactly right. Peppermint leaves, lemon basil or Thai basil will all give a nice look and a pleasant flavor, even if it won't be quite the same. A combination of mint and and Thai or Holy basil might be your best bet. A tiny, tiny drop of toasted sesame oil will ...


1

I just started making these fresh but so far have prepped from frozen and they are pretty tasty. Coat the bottom of a skillet with oil (I use cast iron, I don't like tephlon, nonstick pans). heat to med high, add the gyoza, cover with 2/3 cups of water. Add a lid, let the water simmer to steam the gyoza for about 8 minutes, remove the lid, once all the ...


6

The nori that you buy as sheets is usually a different species than that of the form prepared as aonori. The form that you buy in sheets is, additionally, typically roasted, which changes the flavor. Aonori is usually of the genus Monostroma or Enteromorpha. Toasted nori for sushi is usually of the genus Porphyra. Because of those two details, I don't ...


2

Please see the excerpt below from this site . All of the recipes I've seen for anko recommend changing the water but this is the only explanation I've found. Amy Escobar MARCH 12, 2014, 3:13 PM Hey Nami, do you know why the boiling water is emptied and then refilled? Cooking With Dog uses the same method and I don’t know the reason. REPLY ...


1

I don't recall ever seeing regular onions in my ramen in southern Japan (but scallions, maybe--it was many years ago, so it's hard to remember). As for topping oil, the only one I ever saw was "Chinese fire oil", which was usually provided on the side for addition at the customer's discretion. I loved the heat from the fire oil but could only stand at most ...



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