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19

What you are looking for is spherification. You need to use a different hydrocoloid than gelatin. There are a couple of techniques you can use. If you want solid spheres, you can mix your liquid with agar agar, which is readily available in the asain section of the grocery store, bring it to a simmer, and then use an eye dropper to drop the liquid in to a ...


8

i came across this webpage ( http://www.myscienceproject.org/j-shot.html ) some time ago. i think you may want to read into it. so there it seems that 1) you can add up to 20oz 80-proof vodka without making the gelling a failure 2) for sugar-free kind jello shots you can use even more alcohol Do have a look at that webpage. tons of information on jello ...


5

This, I confess, is just a guess—I'd suggest adding some pectin. Pectin is a thickener that occurs naturally in fruit, but its likely absent entirely in the fruit juice you've been using. However, it's probably present in the fruit purée used in the commercial products. Pectin is, for example, the primary (if not only) jelling agent in jam, jelly, and ...


5

The only trick I know is to let it start to firm up before mixing in the fruit. You can pour a layer, let it slightly firm up (it'll be kinda a thick goo), add the fruit and the rest of the mix. ... but you don't want to let it set up completely; then you'll just have two layers that haven't bonded well with fruit stuck in there. Exact time for it to gel ...


4

You'll need two boxes of Jello. Make the first box. Fill up your glasses half way and put them in the refrigerator to start solidifying Added bonus: Tilt the glasses in the fridge Put your fruit in Make the second box, use it to fill up the glasses to the top Bonus: Use different colors of Jello!


4

You are probably fine with the 1:1 ratio for your likely 80 proof liquors. For weaker liqueurs just add more. You probably want 2:1 if you can get it to work.


4

There is a modified form of tapioca that gives a clear solution, but it is not easily available and I do not think it would help in this case. The obvious way to firm up Jello is to use less water than recommended - use somewhere between a half and three quarters of the amount specified on the packet. But you are comparing agar with gelatin here, it is ...


4

I'm totally retracting everything I said in comments. Doing this with just Jello (no unflavored gelatin) works just fine. The key is A LOT of Jello. After reading your question I researched the question of "How much gelatin is in a box of Jello?" The only answer I was able to find was that a 4-serving box of Jello contains as much gelatin as a .25oz packet ...


4

This step mentions you require the extra gelatin: You could kind of "wing" the ratio but that's risky. But when it comes to Baking/Pastries/Deserts, you must get the ratios perfect; even when it comes to gelatin. Coming from experience: there are few foods worse than over gelatinized foods. I would go the safe route and find the necessary amount of ...


3

Covering jello while it sets is not usually a problem. At my last job the pantry person covered the jello every time it was made while setting. This was due to health code regulations. Having the jello for that long usually isn't an issue either unless there was some way moisture got to the box and may have compromised the gelatin or even caused mold growth. ...


3

I've heard that you can extract oils from leafy greens and once concentrated will provide a reddish tint/glow under a black light. The problem is it may not be any more palatable over gelatin. Your best bet may be to go with mint, but I'm sure most aromatic herbs would work. Start by blanching a couple of handfuls your chosen greens for a few minutes ...


2

It sounds like you didn't use pure gelatine, but a pre-mixed product. The way you describe it - with sections which are set and sections still liquid - it sounds like a clumping problem to me. The very weird directions you mention increase my suspicion. Normally, if you put dry gelatine in hot water, parts of it will change immediately, while parts will ...


2

It's possible the lid may have caused condensation from any residual heat to fall back into the jello, resulting in too much liquid. Every site I found on the internet said to cover it only after it's cooled down. Plastic wrap will do fine. Once it has gelled properly, you can put the lid back on to prevent it from picking up other smells or flavors from ...


2

Jello is flavoring and gelatin. Just take a look at the ingredients list for a few flavors on the Kraft website. You're likely right about agar-agar adding the texture properties you desire. An alternative would be to just use a jello mix plus one or more packets of unflavored gelatin.


2

I've tried making fake caviar with Jello and a syringe myself, but as far as I know, this is a fairly recent technique that became popular when molecular gastronomy piqued the interest of many, and no one has figured out how to do it with just Jello. You truly need to use a syringe to get the right shape and size, and special compounds and ...


1

You can try this: Heat slightly quince jelly with some water, in order to make it melt. Use a pipette to let drops fall in a glass of cold oil. Use sunflower seed oil, which is not thickening when cold, put it in the fridge before you make your "eggs". That's more natural than other propositions I read here, and really delicious!



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