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14

There used to be a good reason to add the jelly to the meat pie: food safety. In the time before refrigerators, it was hard to keep meat without some spoilage. But a slaughtered fully grown pig meant some hundred kilos of meat, and it wasn't eaten on a single day. Most of the bacteria which spoil meat need oxygen to proliferate. So once you pack the meat ...


13

according to the Ball canning book (paraphrasing)... JAM is made by cooking crushed or chopped fruits with sugar, and is made of one fruit or a combination of fruits, is spreadable, and is firm but will not hold the shape of the jar. JELLY is made from juice strained from fruit, usually prepared in a way to keep it crystal clear, and is gelatinized enough ...


9

Fruits that are high in pectin are not necessarily sour and sour fruits are not necessarily high in pectin. However, pectin is typically found in high concentrations in firm fleshed fruit such as apples and in the skins of citrus. Unripe fruit has even more than the ripe. So- I can see why you would come to that conclusion. It is easy enough to find charts ...


7

The jelly in British pork pies is added deliberately, after the rest of the pie is cooked, to help keep the meat moist. In good pies it is usually either ham or chicken stock which jellifies as it cools. It is entirely possible to make a pork pie and omit this step at the end, but the pie then needs to be eaten sooner before it dries out.


6

Contrasting flavors and textures will bring out more excitement on the palate. The rich buttery flavor of brie works well with crisp acidic fruit like apples, or pears. Consider salty items like various cured meats such as various types of ham, salami, sausage. Smoke-flavored almonds and salty nuts (marcona almonds). Other preserves: Fig preserves ...


5

I'd place a tray in my sink a slowly run water through it, then sit the jelly on top of the tray, such that the bottom half of the jelly mould is under water. The constant, gentle, flow of cold water will cool the jelly quickly.


5

There's quite a few recipes online. This one seems pretty simple. It looks like in general, you: Liquify your peppers Cook the result with vinegar Strain it Cook the result with salt and sugar Add some pectin Add some whole jalepenos (probably optional) Transfer to jars


4

It's all about the chutney...Usually we're talking a spicy/fruity relish type thing. Excellent counterpoint to brie's regular smoothness, and comes in all flavors from sweet to spicy. My personal favorite is baked brie in puff pastry. Talk about delicious. Serve it with fruit and sliced baguette. As for types, the issue you're going to come up with is ...


4

Another solution - knock on a neighbours door and put the jelly in their fridge to set. Of course it depends on how well you know your neighbours. If you don't know your neighbours, this could be a useful way of breaking the ice - like the clichéd, "asking for a cup of sugar."


4

There is a modified form of tapioca that gives a clear solution, but it is not easily available and I do not think it would help in this case. The obvious way to firm up Jello is to use less water than recommended - use somewhere between a half and three quarters of the amount specified on the packet. But you are comparing agar with gelatin here, it is ...


3

I found a site with another cranberry sauce maker complaining of the end product being too runny. What I learned is that cranberries have lots of natural pectin that is released when they are cooked past bursting. If it were me, I would: cook it some more, keeping it at a boil but watching it carefully so it doesn't boil over and does not start to ...


3

Covering jello while it sets is not usually a problem. At my last job the pantry person covered the jello every time it was made while setting. This was due to health code regulations. Having the jello for that long usually isn't an issue either unless there was some way moisture got to the box and may have compromised the gelatin or even caused mold growth. ...


3

This link http://www.livestrong.com/article/520416-how-to-substitute-lemon-juice-for-citric-acid/ says 1/4 teaspoon of citric acid substitutes 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. So for half a cup of lemon juice, use two teaspoons of citric acid, and compensate for the missing liquid.


3

Yes, you can. In fact, many canning and jarring recipes specifically call for citric acid. Presumably you are using citric acid in its dried, crystalline form. In that case, a solution of around 4% citric acid (e.g. 4gm in 100ml of water) should be around the same strength as lemon juice.


3

I haven't made jam in years and don't know first-hand, but this website suggests it won't scale as the jam won't cook as well. This seems predicated on the idea that your cooking vessel remains the same size but the batch is larger. From the linked site: Most jam recipes already call for you to use the widest pot you have, for maximum surface area. ...


3

Take a large pot or pan and flip it over (flat side up) and place the item on top. This will improve the speed a lot. Of course the more conductive the pan the better -- copper or aluminum pans will work best. This also works for defrosting items (for people with a fridge). If you only have ceramic bowls this might not be such a good solution since ...


3

Yep, it's possible! AllRecipes has a highly rated recipe for Jalapeño jelly: http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/jalapeno-jelly/Detail.aspx


2

Brie de Meaux (aka King's cheese) Try it with honey French Baguettes Fig preserve


2

Quite a common combination in Britain is brie and redcurrant jelly.


2

You could try a gourmet grilled cheese sandwich! If it's very sweet, you could combine it with a more savory cheese and perhaps a fruit like fig. It reminds me of something the patron saint of grilled cheese would use on her blog: http://www.grilledcheesesocial.com/.


2

I have been a baker for over 30 years and made many pork pies in that time,the above answers stating that the jelly acts as a preservative and stops the meat drying out are correct, but also the jelly when added at the correct time, roughly 20 minutes half an hour after baking, absorb the pork juices that would otherwise soak into the pastry which would make ...


2

This would probably be good as an ingredient in a barbecue sauce, assuming the jelly will mix into the other components.


2

It's possible the lid may have caused condensation from any residual heat to fall back into the jello, resulting in too much liquid. Every site I found on the internet said to cover it only after it's cooled down. Plastic wrap will do fine. Once it has gelled properly, you can put the lid back on to prevent it from picking up other smells or flavors from ...


2

Jello is flavoring and gelatin. Just take a look at the ingredients list for a few flavors on the Kraft website. You're likely right about agar-agar adding the texture properties you desire. An alternative would be to just use a jello mix plus one or more packets of unflavored gelatin.


2

I use nylon straining bags for making wine. You can get them in various sizes at homebrew stores. (for example: http://www.midwestsupplies.com/nylon-straining-bag-18-x-32-coarse-mesh.html) I'm sure they'd do the trick for what you need. Although this may only work for passing juice, you might inquire at your local homebrew store if they have a slightly ...


2

It sounds like you didn't use pure gelatine, but a pre-mixed product. The way you describe it - with sections which are set and sections still liquid - it sounds like a clumping problem to me. The very weird directions you mention increase my suspicion. Normally, if you put dry gelatine in hot water, parts of it will change immediately, while parts will ...


2

The amount of sugar in this recipe looks a bit low for a 10 minute simmer. I estimate that the bulk of the ingredients consists of, ~200g sugar ~330g cranberries ~330g bell pepper That's less than 25% sugar. If this were a straight cranberry jelly, you'd need about 40% sugar content for optimal jelly strength and, I estimate, at least 35%. I think that ...


2

In terms of killing pathogens, it is a belt and suspenders thing. The additional processing ensures that any pathogens that entered the jars while you were filling them are killed. More importantly, as Jefromi has reminded us, the additional boiling with the assembled and lidded jars causes the header air to heat up, expanding in volume and raising the ...


2

It seems likely that there was some form of residue left behind in the container; whether this was actual soap or just the scent is difficult to determine. I have found that soap scents do tend to cling a bit more stubbornly to plastic than they do to other materials, but that's just my experience. Next time you might try rinsing the container and drying ...


2

I think what you are looking for is kelp noodles. They are considered a type of glass noodle. They can be eaten raw or cooked in other dishes. In their raw state they are crunchy. Please see this link for a picture and some info. Hope this helps! :)



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